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GENEALOGY 
974.4 
G286M 
1906 



THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION 

.kd^xeo g 8 s« y» 

">■ M tdi — . ' OF THE 

Congregational Churches of Massachusetts 
1906 



MINUTES 



ONE HUNDRED FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING 



WORCESTER, MAY 15, 16, 17 



WITH THE STATISTICS 





3ENE, 


Ma v . 
Of UTAH 

21851 


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SHje JFort $ill $trss 

SAMUEL USHER 
176 TO 184 HIGH STREET. 
BOSTON, MASS.^^ 



-■•^ITHOBA^ 




INTRODUCTORY WORDS 



In sending forth this number of the " Minutes," the Secretary 
would extend thanks to all who have assisted in gathering the 
statistics of churches, conferences, and associations. He wishes, 
also, to thank the reporters of the churches for the church blanks 
returned to him. These are exceedingly useful for reference. 

There is one point upon which we need to place greater impor- 
tance, — promptness in gathering the statistics of the churches. 
If the church reporters make returns promptly after January 1 
to the conference scribe, the scribes can report more promptly to 
the Secretary, who can report more promptly to the Year-Book. 
A delay at the starting point, the report of the church, means a 
delay all along the line. With no less emphasis upon accuracy, 
let us emphasize promptness. 

C. G. B. 



fm 



U% 



GENERAL INDEX 



igures 



in Italics refer to pages in the Statistics. 



Action, Important, of Association: Com- 
mittees instructed, executive com- 
mittee, 23; on gambling, 20, indus- 
trial committee, 25; on polity, 22; on 
ministerial standing, 23; new evan- 
gelistic committee, 20; on plan of 
advisory committee of missionary 
societies, 20. 

Addresses: Rev. C. F. Carter, 75; Rev. 
A. F. Pierce, 67; Miss M. E. Woollej . 
80; Rev. C. F. Swift, 85. 

Apportionment of expenses, 5, 26. 

Assoemtions ( if ministers, 63. 

Auditing committee's report, 31; recom- 
mendations, 29. 



Benevolentf : Statistics of, 35. 
Benevolent societies. Directory of, 6. 
Bible societies, Donations to, 66. 
Board of pastoral supply: Expenses and 

receipts, 34; number of churches 

making use of, 32. 
Budget committee's report, 26. 

Committees of the Association, 4. 
Conferences of the churches, 39. 

Deaths of ministers, 65. 

Del, -nates. List of, 11; number at, 28. 

Dismissions of ministers, 64- 

Executive committee's report, 57. 

Greetings: from Iowa State Association, 
29; New York State Association, 26; 
to Rev. Lyman Whiting, 27. 



Installation of ministers, 64. 



Licentiates, List of, 74- 

Marriages of ministers, 65. 
Ministers, List of, 67. 
Ministerial record, 64. 
Ministerial standing, 23, 46. 

Next annual meeting, 6. 



Petition: Concerning Congo Free State, 
21. 

Publication committee's report, 58. 

Reports: Board of pastoral supply, 32; 
on federation of churches, 58; on 
gambling, 54; incorporation of 
general association, 65; on labor 
organizations, 49; readjustment of 
poUty, 61; on publication, 58; on 
temperance, 53; on work of churches, 
39; on missionary work, 46. 

Resolutions: On Dayton Council, 25; on 
polity, 22; of sympathy, with Cali- 
fornian brethren, 23. 

Rules of Association, 7. 

Secretary's report, 30. 

Statistics of the churches' annual changes, 
37; benevolence, 3-33, 35; home 
expenditure, 3-33, 35; membership, 
2-32, 34; summaries, continued, table 
of, 38; Sunday schools, 3-33, 36; 
Young People's societies, 3-33, 36. 

Treasurer's report, 31. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Contexts 3 

Officers of the Association, 1906-1907 4 

Committees of the Association, 1906-1907 4 

The Next Annual Meeting 6 

Board of Pastoral Supply 5 

Apportionment of Expenses 5 

Directory for Benevolent Contributions 6 

Past Annual Meetings 6 

Rules of the General Association 7 

Minutes of the Meeting of 1906 11 

Number of Delegates at Worcester 28 

Report of the Secretary 30 

, Treasurer 31 

, Auditing Committee 31 

, Board of Pastoral Supply 32 

, Committee on the Work of the Churches . . 39 

, „ „ Missionary Work .... 46 

, ,, ,, Labor Organizations ... 49 

, ,, ,, Temperance 53 

, „ ,, Gambling 54 

, Executive Committee 57 

, Publication Committee 58 

, Committee on Federation of Churches . . . 5S 
, ,, „ Readjustment of Our Polity . 61 
, ,, „ the Incorporation of the Associ- 
ation 65 

Addresses 67 



STATISTICS 



PAGE 

Explanatory 1 

Statistics of the Churches and Sunday Schools .... 2 

Summaries: I. Church Statistics 34 

II. Benevolence and Expenditures 35 

III. ' S. S. and Y. P. S. C. E. Statistics .... 36 

IV. Annual Changes 37 

V. Continued Table of Summaries 38 

The Conferences of the Churches 39 

The Associations of Ministers 46 

Ministerial Record for 1905-1906 64 

Donations to the Bible Societies 66 

Names of Ministers 67 

General Index 75 



> 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION, 1906-1907 

Moderator, — Charles N. Prouty, Spencer. 
Vice-Moderator, — Rev. Samuel C. Bushnell, Arlington. 
Secretary, — Rev. Collins G. Burnham, Chicopee. 
Registrar, — Rev. Francis J. Marsh, Leominster. 
Assistant Registrar, — Rev. Almon J. Dyer, Sharon. 
Treasurer, — Henry P. Emerson, Boston. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Moderator, the Vice-Moderator, the Secretary, the Registrar, the 
Assistant Registrar, the Treasurer, ex-officiis; Rev. Charles L. Noyes, 
Somervillc; Rev. Winfred C. Rhoades, Roxbury; Herbert R. Gibbs, 
Newtonville. 

COMMITTEES 

Provisional Committee. — Rev. William C. Gordon, Westfield; Rev. 
Francis J. Marsh, Leominster; Rev. Newton M. Hall, Springfield; Mr. 
James C. Greenough, Westfield; Rev. George W. Winch, Holyoke. 

Publication Committee. — The Secretary, the Registrar; Rev. Claude A. 
Buttcrfield, Ludlow; Mr. John E. Stewart, Springfield; Mr. Edward N. 
White, Holyoke. 

On the Work of the Churches. — Rev. R. DeWitt Mallary, Housatonic; 
Rev. Edward C. Hayes, Montague; Rev. Theodore E. Busfield, North 
Adams; Mr. Milton E. Daniels, Northampton; Mr. William Knowles 
Cooper, Springfield. 

On Missionary Work. — Rev. Charles H. Daniels, South Framingham; 
Rev. William W. Jordan, Clinton; Rev. Henry N. Hoyt, Hyde Park; 
Rev. John J. Walker, Westboro; Mr. Wolcott Johnson, Boston. 

To Audit Accounts. — Mr. Franklin P. Shumway, Melrose: Mr. Frank 
W. B. Pratt, Reading. 

On Temperance. — Rev. Andrew B. Chalmers, Worcester; Rev. William 
O. Conrad, Fitchburg; Rev. Clifton H. Mix, Worcester; Rev. Franke 
A. Warfield, Milford; Mr. William R. Bigelow, Natick. 

Industrial Cmnmittee. — Rev. Clark Carter, Lawrence; Rev. William A. 
Knight, Brighton; Rev. Samuel L. Loomis, Boston; Mr. Bayard E. 
Harrison, Maiden; Mr. John H. Field, Brockton. 

On Gambling. — Mr. William Shaw, Ballardvale; Rev. George W. 
Kenngott, Lowell. 

On Federation of Churches and Co-operation with Other Denominations 
in this State. — Rev. Clark L. Seelye, Northampton; Rev. William V. 
W. Davis, Pittsfield; Rev. Reuen Thomas, Brookline; Rev. William 
T. McElveen, Boston; Rev. Frederick E. Emrich, Boston; Rev. Charles 
H. Oliphant, Methuen; Mr. Jacob P. Bates, Brookline; Mr. Frank 
G. Cook, Cambridge; Mr George E. Copeland, Worcester; Mr. Hamilton 
S. Conant, Boston; Mr. Seba A. Holton, Falmouth; Mr. Clarence A. 
Brodeur, Westfield. 



On Evangelistic Work. — Rev. Frank S. Hunnewell, Reading; Rev. 
Edwin N. Hardy, Quincy; Rev. E. Victor Bigelow, Lowell; Rev. Richard 
Wright, Newburyport; Sir. Fred L. Willis, Worcester. 

On Polity. — Rev. Albert E. Dunning, Boston; Rev. Calvin M. Clark, 
Haverhill; Rev. Charles F. Carter, Lexington; Rev. William R. 
Campbell, Roxbury; Prof. John Winthrop Platner, Andover; Rev. 
Philip S. Moxom, Springfield; Rev. John G. Taylor, Arlington Heights; 
Mr. Arthur S. Johnson, Boston; Mr. Herbert A. Wilder, Newton. 

To Prepare Forms of Organic Union of Churches. — Rev. Albert W. 
Hitchcock, Worcester; Rev. Thomas T. Babb, Holden; Mr. Frederick 
Fosdick, Fitchburg. 

CONGREGATIONAL BOARD OF PASTORAL SUPPLY 

Office, 610 Congregational House 

Board of Directors 
Rev. William H. Allbright, Chairman. 

Rev. Charles B. Rice, Secretary. 

Term Expires 1907 
Rev. Frederick E. Emrich, Brighton. 

Rev. Calvin M. Clark, Haverhill. 
Frank L. Fish, Taunton. 

Herbert A. Boynton, Newton ville. 

Term Expires 190S 

Rev. Edward A. Reed, Holyoke. 

Rev. William E. Strong, Amherst. 
Appleton P. Williams, Upton. 

William S. O'Brien, Abington. 

Term Expires 1909 

Rev. William A. Allbright, Dorchester. 

Rev. Frank W. Merrick, Roslindale. 

Mr. Edward B. Bayley, Boston. 

Mr. Henry H. Proctor, Boston. 



APPORTIONMENT OF EXPENSES 

The churches are requested to contribute through the treasurers of 
their conferences for the expenses of the General Association a sum 
equivalent to five cents for each member, based upon the total membership 
of January 1, 1906, and the treasurers of the conferences are requested 
to forward the amounts as soon as possible to the treasurer, Mr. Henry 
P. Emerson, 33 Kingston Street, Boston. 



DIRECTORY FOR BENEVOLENT CONTRIBUTIONS 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Congregational 
House, Boston. — Frank H. Wiggin, Treasurer. 

Woman's Board of Missions, Room 704, Congregational House, Boston. 
— Miss Sarah Louise Day, Treasurer. 

Congregational Home Missionary/ Society, Fourth Avenue and Twenty- 
second Street, New York. — William B. Howland, Treasurer. 

Massachusetts (auxiliary to Congregational) Home Missionary Society. 
Room 609, Congregational House, Boston. — Rev. Joshua Coit, Treasurer. 

Woman's Home Missionary Association, Room 607, Congregational 
House, Boston. — Miss Lizzie D. White, Treasurer. 

American Missionary Association, Fourth Avenue and Twenty-second 
Street, New York. — H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer. 

Congregational Church Building Society, Fourth Avenue and Twenty- 
second Street, New York. — Charles E. Hope, Treasurer. 

Congregational Education Society, Room 612, Congregational House, 
Boston. — S. F. Wilkins, Treasurer. 

Congregational Sunday-School and Publishing Society, Congregational 
House, Boston. — Phineas Hubbard, Treasurer. 

National Council's Ministerial Relief Fund. — Rev. Samuel B. Forbes, 
Hartford, Conn., Treasurer. 

Ministerial Relief in Massachusetts is represented by the Board of Min- 
isterial Aid. — Arthur G. Stan wood, Treasurer, Room 701, Sears Building, 
Boston. 







PAST ANNUAL MEETINGS 






Moderator 


Preacher 


1SS6 


Westfield 


Lyman S. Rowland 


William E. Griffis 


lss? 


Brockton 


Ariel E. P. Perkins 


David O. Means 


lsss 


Spencer 


Edward J. Thomas 


Charles A. Dickinson 


LNS'I 


Newburvport 


J. L. Jenkins 


Arthur Little 


1S90 


Holyoke 


Alonzo H. Quint 


Wolcott Calkins 


is! H 


Marlboro 


Gilbert E. Hood 


Edward G. Seldon 


is! 12 


Springfield 


DeWitt S. Clark 


Samuel E. Herrick 


IV "U 


Boston 


Thomas Weston 


Paul Van Dyke 


1894 


Pittsfield 


Elijah Horr 


George A. Gordou 


IN'!.") 


Lynn 


Elijah A. Morse 


Philip S. Moxom 
DeWitt S. Clark 


1890 


Fall River 


Smith Baker 


1S97 


Worcester 


Thomas Todd 


Charles E. Jefferson 


1 S9S 


Greenfield 


G. R. W. Scott 


Areturus Z. Conrad 


1S99 


Brockton 


John L. Brewster 


Edward L. Clark 


1900 


Amherst 


Philip S. Moxom 


William H. Davis 


1901 


Andover 


Henrv M. Moore 


Reuen Thomas 


1902 


Plymouth 


Charles H. Beale 


George A. Gordon 


1903 


Great Barring 


ton William B. Plunkett 


John H. Denison 


1904 


Fitchburg 


William E. Wolcott 


Edward A. Reed 


1905 


Lowell 


Seba A. Holton 


Leonard W. Bacon 


1906 


Worcester 


Edward M. Noyes 


John H. Lock wood 



THE NENT ANNUAL MEETING 

The annual meeting of 1907 will be with Second Church, Westfield, on 
the third Tuesdav in May. 



RULES OF THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION 



ARTICLE I. — Name. 

This bodj' shall be called The General Association of the Congre- 
gational Churches of Massachusetts. 



ARTICLE II. — Object. 

Its object is to promote (a) intercourse and fellowship between Congre- 
gational ministers and churches of the Commonwealth; (b) the co-opera- 
tion of the churches with one another for their mutual comfort and 
development, and for the religious care of the home field; (c) the presen- 
tation and discussion of matters vital to our faith, and the interests of 
our denomination; and (d) the co-operation of this body with other eccle- 
siastical bodies for the general increase of Christian union and spiritual 
efficiency, and the advancement of Christ's kingdom in the earth. 



ARTICLE III. — Doctrinal Basis. 

This Association approves the Declaration of Faith adopted by the 
National Council of Congregational Churches in the year 1865, and the 
subsequent Declaration of the Commission of 1883; the system of belief 
therein set forth being understood by us to be a summary of the His- 
toric Doctrines held by the churches of New England as the teachings of 
the Gospel. 

ARTICLE IV. — Denominational Basis. 

Being based exclusively upon Congregational principles, this Associa- 
tion shall, under no circumstances, exercise ecclesiastical authority over 
churches or individuals, or interfere with the government or discipline 
of the churches, or consent to hear appeals, or give advice in ecclesiastical 
causes of any kind. 



ARTICLE V. — Members. 

1. Each evangelical Congregational Church, Conference, and Association 
in this Commonwealth may choose one delegate, and these delegates, to- 
gether with the pastors of the churches (who shall be members ex-officio), 
the officers of this body, and two delegates from the Massachusetts Home 
Missionary Society, shall constitute the General Association. 

2. Delegates from corresponding bodies, ministers appointed to preach 
before the Association, and chairmen of committees who attend to pre- 
sent reports, together with such other persons as the Association may 
vote to admit, shall be honorary members, with the privilege of speaking, 
but without vote. 



8 Rules of the General Association [1906 

ARTICLE VI. — Officers. 

1. The officers shall be a Moderator, Vice-Moderator, a Secretary, a 
Registrar, an Assistant Registrar, and a Treasurer. All members of Con- 
gregational churches in this Commonwealth shall be eligible to any of 
these offices. The officers shall be elected by ballot, the Moderator and 
Vice-Moderator each to serve one year, the other officers each to serve 
three years, and until the election of their successors. The terms of all 
officers, save when chosen to fill vacancies, shall begin at the close of the 
meeting at which they are elected. 

2. The officers, together with three delegates annually chosen by ballot 
for this purpose, shall constitute an Executive Committee. 

3. The Moderator, or in his absence, the Vice-Moderator, shall preside 
over all the meetings of the Association and shall be chairman of the 
Executive Committee. 

4. (a) The Secretary shall conduct the correspondence of the Associa- 
tion, collect and publish in connection with the annual " Minutes " the 
statistics of ministers and churches, distribute the publications of the 
Association, copies of which he shall preserve for permanent use, give 
suitable notice to the churches of the time and place of each annual meet- 
ing, notify officers and committees of their election or appointment, and 
fulfil such other functions as the Association may from time to time 
direct. 

(b) The Secretary shall receive a salary of seven hundred and fifty 
dollars, and by the authority and under the direction of the Executive 
Committee, he may, when necessary, employ an assistant, at a compen- 
sation to be fixed by the Executive Committee. 

5. The Registrar shall keep a full record of each meeting, which he shall 
preserve as the permanent property of the Association, and he shall also 
keep the minutes of the Executive Committee. 

6. The Assistant Registrar shall aid the Registrar in making the records; 
shall take his place during his absence; and, in the event of a vacancy in 
the Registrar's office, shall act as Registrar until the office shall be filled 
by the Executive Committee or by a regular election. 

7. The Treasurer shall receive all money raised for the use of the Asso- 
ciation, disburse the same as directed by the Executive Committee, and 
shall make an annual report, to be audited as the Association may direct. 

8. The Executive Committee shall have charge of all the interests and 
business of the Association between the annual meetings, shall fill all 
vacancies occurring during the interim, and shall make an annual report 
to the Association 

9. The travelling expenses of the Secretary, Registrar, Assistant Regis- 
trar and Treasurer, in attending the annual meetings, shall be paid by the 
Association. 

ARTICLE VII. — Annual Meeting. 

1. The annual meeting shall be held at the appointed place on the 
third Tuesday of May at two o'clock p. m., or at such other hour as the 
Executive Committee may find expedient. 

2. In the practical administration of its home missionary work, the 
instrument of the Association shall be the Massachusetts Home Mission- 
ary Society, a place for which shall be made in the program of the annual 
meeting. 



1906] Rules of the General Association 9 

ARTICLE VIII. — Organization-. 

The Moderator, or in his absence, the Vice-Moderator, shall call the 
Association to order. In the absence of both, any member of the Execu- 
tive Committee may call the Association to order, and a moderator pro 
tern, shall be chosen to serve during the absence of the proper officer. 

ARTICLE IX. — Committees. 

1. Immediately after the opening of the annual meeting the Modera- 
tor shall appoint: — 

(a) A Committee on Credentials, to which all credentials shall be 
referred. 

(b) A Committee on Nominations, which shall nominate all the officers 
of the Association, all standing committees, as hereinafter provided, and 
all other committees raised by the Association. 

(c) A Committee of Business, of which two shall be chosen from the 
Provisional Committee. The duty of the Business Committee shall be 
to prepare and present the schedule of business for each session, and no 
business shall be introduced except through the hands or with the ap- 
proval of this committee; provided, however, that if the Business Com- 
mittee shall decline to present any matter proposed by a member of this 
Association he shall have the right of appeal to the Association. 

(d) A Budget Committee of three, which shall report before the close 
of the meeting on the state of the treasury, the amount of money needed 
for the ensuing year, and ways and means for meeting the need. 

2. The following Standing Committees shall be nominated by the 
Committee on Nominations: — 

(a) A Provisional Committee, of which the Secretary or Registrar 
shall be a member. This committee shall prepare the program for the 
next annual meeting, selecting the preacher of the annual sermon, and 
the various speakers for each session. 

(b) A Publication Committee, of which the Secretary and Registrar 
shall be members, which shall make provision for the printing of such 
documents and papers as may be necessary in the work of the Associa- 
tion, or as shall be ordered printed by the Association. Under the direc- 
tion of this committee the Secretary shall have charge of all the printing 
of the Association. 

(c) A Committee on the Work of the Churches. This committee shall 
report on the work of the churches and the state of religion in the Com- 
monwealth. The Scribes of the local conferences shall be corresponding 
members of this committee. 

(d) A Committee on Missionary Work. 

(e) A Committee to Nominate Candidates for Corporate Membership 
in the American Board. 

(f) A Committee of two to Audit the Treasurer's Report. 

3. Each of these committees, save as otherwise provided above, shall 
consist of five members, and shall be elected annually by viva voce vote, 
all, save those named by the Moderator, to serve the ensuing year. 

4. The reports of all committees that are to be presented to the Asso- 
ciation shall be furnished to the Secretary on or before April 1 of each 
year, and shall be printed and distributed to the churches not less than 
two weeks before the annual meeting. 



10 Rules of the General Association [1906 

These reports shall not be read to the Association save by special order; 
but the Provisional Committee may arrange for the adequate discussion 
of any or all of the topics presented in the reports. 

ARTICLE X. — Board of Pastoral Supply. 

1. The Association may create a Board of Pastoral Supply to consist 
of twelve members, four of whom shall be elected each year for a term of 
three years. 

2. This board may choose its own secretary, and through it shall make 
an annual report to the Association. 

A copy of this report shall be furnished to the Secretary of the Asso- 
ciation in time to be printed before the annual meeting. 

ARTICLE XL — Special Orders. 

1. Each session of the annual meeting shall be opened and closed with 
divine worship. 

2. On each morning of the annual meeting, after the first day, the 
minutes of the preceding day shall be read; the minutes of the last day 
shall be read immediately before the final adjournment. 

3. On Tuesday evening of each annual meeting the annual sermon 
shall be preached, followed by the celebration of the Lord's Supper. 

4. The place of the next annual meeting shall be recommended each 
year by the Business Committee and designated by vote of the Asso- 
ciation. 

ARTICLE XII. — Rules of Order. 

The Rules of Order shall be those of common parliamentary usage, 
subject to the following specifications: — 

1. Xo members shall speak more than twice on -the same question 
without leave of the Association. 

2. When a question is before the Association the Moderator shall en- 
tertain motions only as follows: To adjourn, to table, for the previous 
question, to postpone to a fixed time, to commit, to amend, or to post- 
pone indefinitely; these several motions shall have precedence in the fore- 
going order. 

3. Xo vote not essential to the conduct of the business of the Asso- 
ciation shall be passed except by a two-thirds vote of those present and 
voting; nor shall any such vote be passed, except bv unanimous con- 
sent, until at least fifteen minutes shall have been allowed for debate. 

ARTICLE XIII. — Amendments. 

1. Any of the above articles, except the first five, may be amended 
at any annual meeting by a two-thirds vote, provided that the proposed 
amendment shall have been submitted to the Association in writing on 
the day previous. 

2. Either of the first five articles may be amended by a two-thirds 
vote, but only after the proposed amendment has been submitted to the 
Association in writing at the previous annual meeting, and notice has 
been sent to the several Associations, Conferences and churches con- 
nected with this body at least three months prior to the meeting at which 
action is to be taken. 



MINUTES 



The General Association of the Congregational 
Churches of Massachusetts held its one hundred and fourth 
annual meeting with the Central of Worcester, May 15-17, 
1906. 



ROLL OF THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION 



CHURCHES MINISTERS DELEGATES 

Adams Rev. J. S. Voorhees Mrs. J. S. Voorhees 

Amesbury, Main Street . . Orange S. Gordon * 

Andover, South Rev. Clark Carter 

,, West Frederick S. Boutwell 

„ Seminary . . . Prof. Owen II . Gates 

Arlington Rev. Samuel C. Bushnell 

Heights .... Rev. John G. Taylor 

Ashland Edward T. Billings 

Athol Rev. C. O. Eames Daniel P. Kimball 

Attleboro, Second .... Rev. J. Lee Mitchell Dea. C. E. Bliss 

Auburn Rev. J. Lewis Evans Dea. Thomas S. Eaton 

Aver Rev. Lewis E. Terry Miss Mary B. Johnson 

Barnstable, Cotuit .... Rev. Lyman Mevis 

Barre Dr. W. H. Whiting 

Becket, North Dr. J. D. Howe 

Bedford Rev. David C. Torrey Edward G. Loomis 

Belmont, Plymouth . . . Rev. Burke F. Leavitt 

Berklev Rev. George W. Christie 

Berlin' Rev. Chas. O. Parker Dea. William S. Eager 

Beverly, Dane Street . . Rev. Edwin H. Bvington 

Boston, Old South .... Rev. George A. Gordon H. H. Proctor 

„ Union Dea. Hamilton S. Conant 

Phillips, South . . Rev. Fred. B. Richards Dea. J. E. Donely 
,, Brighton .... Rev. William A. Knight 
,, Village, Dorch'r . Rev. George W. Brooks 

Eliot, Roxbury . . Rev. W. C. Rhoades Dea. Timothy Smith 
W. Roxbury . . . Rev. Frank W. Merrick Rev. Perlev B. Davis 
,, Shawmut .... Rev. William T. McElveen 
,, Immanuel, Roxb'y Rev. Edward P. Drew 
„ Trinity, Neponset . Rev. C. H. Washburn Walter N. Baker 
,, Pilgrim, Dorch'r . John A. Fowle 

„ Harvard, Dorch'r . Rev. William T. Beale Dea. Geo. C. Wheatlev 
„ Central, Dorch'r . Rev. George H. Flint 
Roslindale . . '. . Rev. Perlev B. Davis 
,, St. Mark .... Rev. Samuel A. Brown 
Boxboro, West Acton . . Rev. Francis II. Viets 
Boylston, Center .... Dea. Lyman S. Walker 

Brimfield Rev. Samuel Eaton 

Brockton, South, Campello Rev. Albert F. Pierce William Nason 

Waldo .... Rev. R. L. Rae James T. McCaughey 

Wendell Ave. . Rev. Edgar B. French 
,, Lincoln .... Rev. Samuel D. Turner 

11 



12 



Minutes 



[1906 



CHURCHES MINISTERS DELEGATES 

Brookfield Rev. W. E. Streeter Mrs. C. M. Ormsby 

Brookline, Harvard . . . Rev. Reuen Thomas 

,, I.evden .... Rev. Harris G. Hale Rev. TI. A. Bridgman 

Cambridge, First .... Rev. Alex. P. Bourne Prof. H. W. Magoun 
1st Evangelical Rev. Charles E. Beals John A. Odde, Jr. 
Pilgrim . . . Miss Lucy K. Hawes 

Carlisle Rev. A. Herbert Ames Mrs. A. H. Armes 

Charlton M. Daniel Woodbury 

Chelsea, First Henry H. Stickney 

,, Central Rev. John A. Higgons 

Chicopee, First Rev. Collins G. Burnham 

Second, Falls . Rev. H. G. Pillsbury N. P. Ames Carter 
Third .... Rev. H. P. Woodin" Dea. George H. Hale 
Clinton ......... Rev. Wm. W. Jordan Dea. Joseph McGown 

,, German Rev. Edward L. Hobrin 

Cohasset Warren L. Tower 

Concord Rev. G. A. Tewksbury Henry L. Rolf e 

Cummington Rev. Ralph H. White 

West .... Rev. Ralph H. White 

Dalton Rev. George W. Andrews 

Danvers. First, Center . . Rev. Charles B. Rice 

„ Maple Street . . Rev. R. A. MacFadden Dea. Samuel L. Sawyer 
Dartmouth, South .... Rev. Frank A. Fuller 

Dedham Rev. Edward H. Rudd Charles B. Botsford 

Deerfield Rev. G. F. Merriam Mrs. E. M. Merriam 

Douglas Rev. Edward B. Blanchard 

East Rev. Edward B. Blanchard 

Dracut, First Rev. John A. McKnight 

Dudley Rev. Frederick D. Thayer 

Dunstable Rev. Augustus M. Rice 

Duxbury Rev. Henry B. Mason 

Hasthampton, First . . . Rev. Geo. H. Burrill Henry D. Brierly 
East Longmeadow .... Rev. Charles H. Wilder 

Edgartown Rev. Fred. M. Cutler Mrs. Lillian M. Cutler 

Enfield Herbert A. Barlow 

Everett, Mystic Side . . . Rev. Chas. H. Percival Allison C. Smith 
Fall River, Central . . . . Rev. Clarence F. Swift Dea. Henrv H. Earl 
Fowler .... Dea. Thomas Chew 

,, French .... Rev. Samuel P. Rondeau 

Broadway . . Rev. James E. Enman 
Fitchburg, Calvinistic . . Rev. James Chalmers Mrs. C. P. Dickinson 

Rollstone . . . Frederick H. Lane 

Framingham, Plymouth . Rev. L. R. Eastman Dr. Elles L. Keith 

South, Grace Rev. Charles PI. Daniels Frederick J. Stevens 

Franklin, First Rev. John Reid Dea. Chas. L. Stewart 

Gardner Rev. Burton S. Gilman Dea. Henrv H. Smith 

Goshen Prof. Henrv G. Smith 

Grafton, Union Rev. Charles M. Crooks 

Granby Rev. Robert C. Bell 

Greenfield, Second .... Rev. Charles W. Merriam 

Greenwich Rev. David L. Kebbe Dea. Walter H. Glazier 

Hadley, First Rev. Thomas A. Emerson 

Hampden Rev. Charles B. Bliss 

Harvard Rev. J. Sherman Gove 

Hatfield Rev. Robert M. Woods Edwin H. Field 

Haverhill, Center .... Rev. Calvin M. Clark William A. Perrv 
North .... Rev. J. S. Williamson Leonard W. Smith 

Holden Rev. Thomas E. Babb Mrs. Thomas E. Babb 

Holliston Rev. Geo. A. Andrews H. M. Rogers 

Holvoke, First Rev. Geo. W. Winch Dea. Geo. W. Brainard 

Second .... Rev. Edward A. Reed Dea. Edwin W. Chapin 

Hopkinton Rev. A. F. Travis Elijah Fitch 

Hudson Matthew Southward 



1906] Minutes 13 

CHURCHES MINISTERS DELEGATES 

Huntington, 1st, Norwich . Rev. Webster L. Hendrick 

Hyde Park Rev. Henry N. Hoyt Prof. William A. Mowry 

Ipswich, First Rev. Edward Constant 

LawTence, Trinity .... Rev. Fred. H. Page William J. Prince 

Leicester Rev. J. B. Thrall Charles A. Denny 

Lenox Rev. Edward C. Sedgwick 

Leominster Rev. Lawrence Phelps Rev. Joel D. Miller 

„ North .... Rev. Albert F. Newton Mrs. Carrie L. Wood 

Lexington Rev. Charles F. Carter 

Lincoln Nathan S. Fiske 

Longmeadow Rev. Henrv L. Bailey Charles P. Tabor 

Lowell, Pawtucket .... Rev. Edwin R. Smith 

,, Eliot Rev. E. Victor Bigelow Asa C. Russell 

„ Kirk Street . . . Rev. George E. Martin Dea. S. H. Thompson 

Ludlow, Center Henry D. Carver 

Lynn, First Rev. George W. Owen 

„ Central Rev. Charles F. Weeden 

North Rev. Arthur J. Covell Mrs. Arthur J. Covell 

Maiden, First Edward Gay 

Manchester Rev. C. Arthur Lincoln 

Mansfield Rev. Wm. M. Macnair Dea. Charles L. Carey 

Marblehead Rev. Nicholas Van der Pyl 

Marshfield Hills Rev. Charles P. Holbrook 

Medford, Mvstic Dea. Daniel N. Wilcox 

West Rev. Burt L. Yorke 

Medway, 2d, West .... Mrs. Lydia S. Thayer 

„ Village Rev. R. W. Drawbridge Mrs. R. W. Drawbridge 

Melrose Rev. Thomas Sims Dea. John Buffum 

,, Highlands .... Rev. Henry Hyde Fred A. Houdlette 

Merrimac Dea. B. Frank Sargent 

Middleboro, Central . . . Henry W. Sears 

Millbury Rev. Geo. A. Putnam Dea. H. W. Davidson 

,, Second Rev. Grove F. Ekins Dea. Chas. F. Holman 

Milton Dea. John A. Tucker 

Monson Rev. Nathanael M. Pratt 

Montague, Turners Falls . Dea. C. H. Rice 

Nahant Rev. Arthur S. Burrill 

Natick Rev. Morris H. Turk Dea. John R. Adams 

South Rev. Albert A. Felch 

New Braintree Dea. George K. Tufts 

Newbury, Byfield .... Rev. Herbert E. Lombard 

Newburyport, Prospect St. Rev. George P. Merrill 

Belleville. . Rev. Richard Wright Dea. Frank A. Thurlow 

Newton, First, Center . . Rev. Edward M. Noyes William H. Cobb 

Eliot Everett E. Kent 

,, Auburndale . . . Rev. Samuel W. Dike 

,, North Rev. Henry C. Oxnard Mrs. James Galway 

,, Newtonville . . . Thomas K. McAllister 

,, Highlands . . . Rev. George T. Smart Charles H. Newhall 

North Adams Rev. T. E. Busfield D.J.Barber 

N. Attleboro, Oldtown . . J. Eddy Chace 

,, Trinity . . . Rev. Allen A. Brondson 

Northboro Rev. Albert D. Smith Rev. Henry V. Emmons 

Northbridge, Whitinsville . Rev. John R. Thurston 

North Brookfield .... Rev. Samuel B. Cooper 

North Reading Rev. John II . Hoffman 

Orleans Rev. Howard A. Morton 

Oxford Rev. C. M. Carpenter Dea. John E. Kimball 

Palmer, Second Rev. Frank ff Brewer Dea. Chas. W. Bennett 

Three Rivers . . . Rev. Charles Olmstead 

Paxton Rev. George H. Pratt Charles F. Flint 

Pepperell Rev. Albert H. Wheelock 

Phillipston Dea. Lyman B. Smith 



14 



Minutes 



[1 906 



CHURCHES 

Pittsfield, First 

,, Pilgrim Mem'l . Rev. 

Plymouth, Manomet . . . Rev. 

„ Pilgrimage . . Rev. 

Chiltonvitle . . Rev. 

Princeton Rev. 

Quincy, Bethany .... Rev. 

Randolph Rev. 

Reading Rev. 

Rehoboth Rev. 

Revere, First Rev. 

Rochester, E.,W. Wareham Rev. 
Rockport, First .. . . . . Rev. 

Pigeon Cove . . Rev. 

Royalston Rev. 

Rutland Rev. 

Salem, Tabernacle .... Rev. 
Saugus, Cliftondale . . . Rev. 

Scituate, Center Rev. 

Sharon Rev. 

Shelburne Rev. 

Shrewsbury Rev. 

Somerville, West .... Rev. 

Prospect Hill . Rev. 

Southboro Rev. 

Southville . . . Rev. 
Southbridge . . . ; . .' Rev. 

South Hadley Rev. 

Falls . . . Rev. 

Spencer Rev. 

Springfield, First .... 

Olivet .... Rev. 

South .... Rev. 
„ North .... Rev. 

„ Ind. Orchard . Rev. 

Hope .... Rev. 

French .... Rev. 
,, Emmanuel . . 

Park Rev. 

Faith .... Rev. 

Stoneham Rev. 

Stoughton Rev. 

Sudbury, South Rev. 

Sunderland 

Swampscott Rev. 

Taunton, Union Rev. 

Templeton, Baldwinville . Rev. 

Townsend 

Upton Rev. 

Uxbridge Rev. 

Walpole Rev. 

Ware, East 

Wareham Rev. 

Wavland Rev. 

Webster Rev. 

Welleslev 

„ " Hills Rev. 

Westboro Rev. 

West Boylston Rev. 

Westfield, First Rev. 

Second .... Rev. 

Westminster 

West Stockbridge, Center . Rev. 



Frank W. B. Pratt 
Dea. F. A. Bliss 



MINISTERS DELEGATES 

Dea. Wm. G. Harding 
James E. Gregg 
Thomas M. Davies 

Wm. W. Dornan Rev. T. D. McLean 
William W. Dornan 
Charles E. Reeves Dea. X. S. Howard 
Edwin N. Hardy 
John L. Sewall 
F. S. Hunnewell 
Chas. B. Wathen 
John W. Horner 
John A. Pogue 
Israel Ainsworth 
Edward P. Kelly 
Francis J. Fairbanks 
James A. Solandt 
DeWitt S. Clark 

N. McKinnon Mrs. F. E. Hulen 

Frederick B. Noyes 
Almon J. Dyer Mrs. A. J. Dyer 
John A. Goodrich 

A.H.Sedgwick Dea. D. W. Bemis 
Edward E. Braithw-aite 
Richard G. Woodbridge 
Martin F. Mevis Dea. A. C. Eastman 
Martin F. Mevis Dea. F. Chickering 
George A. Gordon Herbert R. Beecher 
Jesse G. Nichols John E. Lyman 
Frank E. Butler 
Edwin G. Zellars 



Noah Sagendorph 
Dea. Charles A. Gleason 
Charles H. Barrows 
Rev. Samuel H. Lee 
Henry N. Penfield 



R. S. Underwood 
Philip S. Moxom 
Newton M. Hall 
Wilford E. Mann 
Samuel H. Woodrow 
Charles L. Charron 

Dea. Nelson Lombard 
John L. Kilbon Dea. James H. Barton 

D. Butler Pratt Mrs. D. B. Pratt 

B. A. Dumm Rev. Aaron B. Peffers 
Thomas Bickford George E. Bird 
Elbridge C. Whiting 

Dea. A. Fayette Warner 
Geo. H. Johnson Rev. Geo. A. Jackson 
George H. Johnson 
Richard Peters 

Charles T. H:ivn>-~ 

E. W. Eldridge Appleton P. Williams 
Alexander Wiswall 

Hugh MacCullum 

Dr. W. O. Barrett 

C. Groezinger John M. Freeman, Jr. 
LawTence Perry 

Andrew Campbell 

Rev. Charles S. Brooks 
Parris T. Farwell Rev. Daniel E. Adams 
John J. Walker Arthur A. Winsor 
John E. Dodge Mrs. Waldo B. Howe 
John H. Lockwood 
Wm. C. Gordon Miss Henrietta L. Gay 

J. Harvev Miller 
Walter W. Curtis 



1906] 



Minutes 15 



CHURCHES MINISTERS DELEGATES 

West Stockbridge, Village Rev. Walter W. Curtis 

West Tisburv Rev. Haig Adadourian 

Weymouth, "Old South, 

South Rev. Henry C. Alvord Miss F. Adelaide Dyer 

Weymouth & Braintree, 

East B Rev. R. H. Cochrane Mrs. C. Edward Mayo 

Wilbrahara Rev. Martin S. Howard 

North .... Rev. Charles H. Gates 

Williarastown, White Oaks Rev. Charles M. Bryant 
Winchendon, First .... Rev. Gustavus W. Jones 

North . . . Mrs. Sarah I. Hall 

Winchester Rev. D. A. Newton Harrison Parker 

Woburn, North Rev. George H. Tilton 

Worcester, First Rev. John H. Mathews Pea. H. PI. Merriam 

Central .... Rev. A. H. Hitchcock Fred L. Willis 
,, Memorial . . . Rev. O. J. Billings Miss Clara Warren 

„ Swedish First . Rev. Oscar F. Norsen 

Pilgrim .... Rev. Clifton H. Mix George A. Blake 

,, Park Rev. Iuman L. Willcox Miss Ida R. Giddings 

, , Hope .... John Ward 

,, Lake View . . Rev. Albert V. House 

Bethany . . . Rev. Albert G. Todd John G. Murdock 
,, Armenian . . Rev. Garabed M. Manavian 

,, Immanuel . . Mrs. John Odette 

,, Swedish, Second Rev. Ludwig Akeson 

Adams Sq. . . Rev. Percy H. Epler Dea. Albert L. Sargent 

DELEGATES FROM THE CONFERENCES 

Andover Mr. William Shaw, of Ballardvale. 

Brookfield Rev. Sylvanus Haywood, of Globe Village. 

Hampden Rev. Charles H. Gates, of Wilbraham. 

Mendon Rev. Webster Woodbury, of South Framingham. 

Old Colony Rev. Frank A. Fuller, of South Dartmouth. 

Pilgrim Rev. Henrv B. Mason, of Duxburv. 

Suffolk, North Dea. Charles H. Shute, of Cambridge. 

Suffolk. South Rev. Samuel L. Loomis, of Boston. 

Suffolk, West Rev. Jay T. Stocking, of Newtonville. 

Worcester, Central .... Rev. George S. Dodge, of Boylston. 
Worcester, North .... Mr. W. H. Brock, of Athol. 
Worcester, South .... Mr. George K. Nichols, of Grafton. 



Berkshire, South 
Brookfield . . . 
Middlesex, South 
Norfolk .... 
Suffolk, South . 
Suffolk, West . . 
Woburn .... 
Worcester, Central 



DELEGATES FROM THE ASSOCIATIONS 

. Rev. Walter W. Curtis, of West Stockbridge. 

. Rev. Benson M. Frink, of West Brookfield. 

. Rev. James B. King, of Hopkinton. 

. Rev. Edward Norton, of Quincy. 

. Rev. Benjamin F. Hamilton, of Roxbury. 

. Rev. George T. Smart, of Newton Highlands 

. Rev. William J. Batt, of Concord. 

. Rev. Eldridge Mix, of Worcester. 



MEMBERS OF THE ASSOCIATION, ex-officiis 

Rev. Edward M. Noyes, Newton Moderator 

James Logan. Worcester Vice-Moderator 

Rev. Collins G. Burnham, Chicopee Secretary 

Rev. Francis J. Marsh. Leominster Registrar 

Rev. Almon J. Dyer, Sharon Assistant Registrar 



16 Minutes [1906 

TUESDAY. 

Opening Session. 

The Association was called to order at 2.35 o'clock p.m., by 
the moderator, Rev. E. M. Noyes, of Newton. The hymn, 
" The Church's one Foundation," was sung, and prayer was 
offered by the moderator. 

PROGRAM ADOPTED. 

By vote of the Association the program of the Provisional 
Committee was made the order of the session. 

COMMITTEES. 

The following committees were then appointed by the 
moderator: 

On Nominations. — Rev. W. W. Jordan, Clinton; Rev. E. V. Bigelow, 
Lowell: Rev. J. L. Kilbon, Springfield; Rev. J. S. Voorhees, Adams; 
E. S. Hathaway, Hyde Park. 

On Credentials. — Rev. G. W. Andrews, Dalton; Rev. J. S. Williamson, 
Haverhill; Timothy Smith, Roxbury; William Shaw, Ballard vale. 

On Business. — Rev. Charles F. Carter, Lexington; Rev. G. P. Merrill, 
Xewburyport; Rev. F. H. Page, Lawrence; Deacon S. M. Holton, Fal- 
mouth; H. A. Boynton, Newton ville. 

On Budget. — Rev. F. S. Hunnewell, Reading; A. C. Russell, Lowell; C. 
A. Gleason, Springfield. 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME. 

The address of welcome was delivered by Rev. A. W. Hitch- 
cock, pastor of the entertaining church, and response was made 
bv the moderator. 



The report of the secretary, Rev. C. G. Burnham, of Chicopee, 
was read and accepted. 

F. P. Shumway, of Melrose, read the report of the treasurer, 
H. P. Emerson, of Boston, and the report was accepted. 

The auditors' report was also presented by Mr. Shumway, 
accepted, and its recommendations referred to the Business 
Committee. 

Rev. Reuen Thomas, of Brookline, by vote of the Association, 
read the report of the Committee on Federation of Churches, 
which report had been set for 10 o'clock, Thursday morning. 

The report of the Committee on the Work of the Churches 
was presented by the chairman, Rev. C. F. Weeden, of Lynn, 
and accepted. 



1906] Minutes 17 

The moderator spoke briefly of a method adopted by his 
church in the admission of new members. 

On recommendation of the Business Committee, Rev. E. T. 
Root, secretary- of the Massachusetts Federation of Churches, 
was invited to address the Association for five minutes on the 
report presented by Rev. Mr. Thomas. 



BUSINESS. 

On recommendation of the Business Committee, it was 

*Voted, That the auditors' recommendation concerning the time of report- 
ing the assessments to the conferences be referred to the Budget Committee. 

Voted, That the recommendation of the Auditing Committee concerning 
reports to the treasurer of expenses of committees be adopted. 

Voted, That the auditors' recommendation concerning financial stand- 
ing of the conferences with the Association be adopted. 

Voted, That a resolution concerning a recommendation of the Advisory 
Committee of the six national missionary societies be made the first order 
of the day, for 9 o'clock Wednesday morning. 

REPORTS CONTINUED. 

Rev. C. H. Daniels presented the report of the Committee 
on Missionary and Evangelistic Work. This report was 
accepted and its recommendations referred to the Business 
Committee. 

The report of the Committee on Gambling was presented, 
and on request of its chairman. Rev. P. W. Lyman, of Fall 
River, Rev. Thomas Chalmers, of Manchester, N. H., was made 
corresponding member of the Association, and given time to 
speak on the work recently done in that state against race-track 
gambling. 

The committee's report was accepted and referred to the 
Business Committee. 

The Committee on Labor Organizations reported through 
its chairman. Rev. P. T. Farwell, of Wellesley Hills, who supple- 
mented the printed report. 

This report was accepted and referred to the Business 
Committee. 

On motion of Rev. F. W. Merrick, of West Roxbury, the 
question of changing the name of the Committee on Labor 
Organizations was referred to the Business Committee. 

The Committee on Temperance reported through its chair- 
man, Rev. William M. Macnair, of Mansfield, who supple- 

* For auditors' recommendations see p. 29. 



IS . Minutes [190G 

mented the printed report. The discussion was continued by 
Hon. Frederick Fosdick, of Fitchburg, who was voted the 
privileges of the floor, and by Rev. C. E. Beals, of Cambridge. 

The report was accepted and referred to the Business 
Committee. 

The time assigned by the program to the hearing of reports 
having expired, on recommendation by the Business Committee, 
it was extended, and the report of the Committee on Delegated 
Representation was presented by its chairman, Rev. N. Van 
der Pyl, of Marblehead, accepted and referred to the Committee 
on Readjustment of Polity. 



BUSINESS. 

A resolution presented by H. S. Conant, of Boston, con- 
cerning proportionate financial support of the work of the 
Massachusetts Federation of Churches was referred to the 
Budget Committee. 



NOMINATIONS. 

The following report of the Nominating Committee was 
adopted : 

For Deacons to Serve at the Evening Communion Service. — D. M. 
"Wheeler, J. C. Berrv, James Logan, C. W. Hobbs, George Sieurin, J. C. 
Woodbury, L. P. Goddard, Frank Colgrove. 

Nominations for Officers. 

For Candidates for Officers and Executive Committee of the Association. 
— Moderator, C. X. Prouty, of Spencer; Vice-Moderator, Rev. S. C. 
Bushnell, of Arlington; Registrar, Rev. F. J. Marsh, of Leominster; 
Assistant Registrar, Rev. A. J. Dyer, of Sharon; Executive Committee, 
Rev. C. L. Noyes, Somerville, Rev. W. C. Rhoades, Roxbury, H. R. 
Gibbs, Xewtonville. 

The recommendation of the Business Committee that the 
first resolution of the Committee on Labor Organizations be 
adopted was approved. 

Voted, To adjourn at 5.40 o'clock. 

Pres. G. Stanley Hall, of Clark University, was given ten 
minutes in which to speak on the relation of the United States 
to the Congo Free States. Rev. P. S. Moxom, of Springfield, 
presented resolutions on the Congo question to be sent to 
Secretary Root and President Roosevelt, and these resolutions 



1906J Minutes 19 

were laid on the table to be taken up for fuller discussion at 
the business session of Wednesday morning. 

The hymn, " Crown Him with many crowns," was sung, 
prayer was offered by Rev. P. S. Moxom, and the Association 
took a recess until 7.30 o'clock. 

Evening Session. 

The Association reassembled at 7.30 o'clock with the modera- 
tor in the chair. 

The scriptures were read by Rev. G. Andrew Gordon, of 
Southbriclge, and prayer was offered by Rev. G. H. Johnson, 
of Swampscott. The hymn, " I love thy kingdom. Lord," was 



SERMON". 

The annual sermon was preached by Rev. John H. Lock- 
wood, of Westfield, from the text, '" For we are God's fellow- 
workers," 1 Cor. 3:9. 

Rev. C. B. Rice made a statement concerning the work of 
the Massachusetts Board of Ministerial Aid, and an offering of 
S67.S0 was made for that object. 

The Lord's Supper was administered by Rev. Nicholas 
Van cler Pyl, of Marblehead, and Rev. G. E. Martin, of Lowell. 

The hymn, " Break thou the bread of life," was sung, and 
the benediction was pronounced by Rev. Mr. Van der Pyl. 

The Association voted to take a recess until $.45 o'clock 
Wednesday morning. 

WEDNESDAY. 
Morning Session. 

At S.45 o'clock, Wednesday morning, the devotional services 
of the Association were led by Rev. A. G. Sedgwick, of Shrews- 
bury. 

At 9 o'clock the Association was called to order by the 
moderator, and the records of the previous sessions were read 
and accepted. 

President S. B. Capen, of the American Board, presented the 
following resolution, it having been made the order of the day : 

Whereas, The Advisory Committee of the six missionary societies in its 
recent conference at Hartford, with officers of these societies, have ascer- 
tained that in order to properly support their missionary work there is 
needed annually a gross sum of two million dollars over and above the 
receipts from legacies, interest on funds, tuition, and other sources of 
income, and 



20 Minutes [1906 

Whereas, It is believed that through the state associations it is possible 
to divide this amount in some fair and equitable proportion among the 
states, so that the full amount may be speedily realized, therefore 

Resolved, That we approve this general purpose of the Advisory Com- 
mittees and that this Association appoint two committees of seven members 
each, one on the work of missions abroad and the other on missions at 
home, to whom this matter may be committed, with authority to consider 
the plans of the Advisory Committee when more completely formulated, 
and to take such action concerning them in the way of recommendations 
to the churches as in their judgment may seem expedient. 

This resolution was adopted after being amended so as to 
provide for one committee of five members. 



On recommendation of the Business Committee the following 
business was transacted : 

Voted, That the committee called for in the previous resolution (Mr. 
Capen's) be made the regular Committee on Missionary Work. 

Voted, That a separate evangelistic committee of five be appointed, 
whose object shall be to assist the churches in promoting evangelistic work, 
and that it work in consultation with the Board of Pastoral Supply. 

Voted, That the name of the Committee on Labor Organizations be 
changed to The Industrial Committee, and that it shall also act as aux- 
iliary to the committee of the National Council of the same name. 

Voted, That the members of our churches be recommended to communi- 
cate with their national representatives urging the creation of a Children's 
Bureau for the national investigation of conditions of child labor. 

Voted, That this body is opposed to any changes in existing laws which 
shall extend the hours during which liquor may be legally sold in hotels or 
saloons. 

Voted, That this Association hereby authorizes its Committee on Tem- 
perance to appear before any committee or committees of the General 
Court and advocate measures. 

Voted, That the Association declare anew its utter condemnation of 
playing for stakes, in every form, not excluding the raffle at church fairs. 

Voted, That the Association express its deepest sympathy with our New 
Hampshire brethren in their fight against race-track gambling. Recog- 
nizing in the location of the Salem track, on our borders, an evil which is 
our own to fight, we tender to our brethren of New Hampshire such aid 
as we can render. 

Voted, That we instruct our Committee on Gambling to join with similar 
committees of other parties in watching race-tracks within our own state, 
and to notify local authorities, having jurisdiction, of our determination 
to appeal to the Governor of the Commonwealth, unless they themselves 
enforce the laws against pool selling and book making on race-tracks. 

Voted, To appoint a committee of three to communicate with the New 
York Association of Congregational Churches now in session. 



1906] Minutes 21 

COMMITTEES. 

On motion of the Nominating Committee, the following 
committees were elected: 

On Work of the Churches. — Rev. R. DeWitt Mallary, Housatonic; Rev. 
Edward C. Hayes, Montague; Rev. Theodore E. Bushfield, North Adams; 
Milton E. Daniels, Northampton; William Knowles Cooper, Springfield. 

Publication Committee. — -Rev. Collins G. Burnham, Chicopee; Rev. 
Francis J. Marsh, Leominster; Rev. Claude A. Butterfield, Ludlow; John 
E. Stewart, Springfield; Edward N. White, Holyoke. 

Industrial Committee. — Rev. Clark Carter, Lawrence; Rev. William 
A. Knight, Brighton; Rev. Samuel Lane Loomis, Boston; Bayard E. 
Harrison, Maiden; John H. Field, Brockton. 

On Temperance. — Rev. Andrew B. Chalmers, Worcester; Rev. William 
O. Conrad, Fitchburg; Rev. Clifton H. Mix, Worcester; Rev. Franke A. 
Warfield, Milford; William R. Bigelow, Natick. 



BUSINESS. 

Voted, That in the absence of Professor Platner, President C. O. Day, of 
Andover Theological Seminary, open the discussion on the report of the 
Committee on Readjustment of Polity. 

Voted, That the time given to the report of Committee on Readjustment 
of Polity and its discussion be extended to 11 o'clock. 

Voted, That the presentation of the Congo resolution be set for 11 o'clock. 

Rev. C. M. Clark, of Haverhill, presented the report of the 
Committee on Readjustment of Polity, which report was 
accepted and referred to the Business Committee. Discussion 
was opened by President C. O. Day, of Andover Theological 
Seminary. 

Voted, To limit the speakers in general discussion to five minutes. 

Voted, To reconsider the motion whereby the time of discussion was 
extended to 11 o'clock, and to hear the report of the Committee on the 
Incorporation of the General Association by Mr. D. C. Brewer, of Boston. 

This report was read by the Secretary, accepted and the com- 
mittee discharged , after which the report was referred to the 
Business Committee. 



PETITION TO THE PRESIDENT AND SECRETARY OF STATE. 

The following petition relating to the Congo atrocities was 
read and unanimously adopted and ordered to be presented 
to the President and to the Secretary of State: 

The Massachusetts General Association of Congregational Churches, in 
convention at Worcester, May 15 to 17, 1906, remembering the predomi- 



22 Minutes [1906 

nant weight of moral influence the United States exerted in the formation 
of the Independent State of the Congo, recognizing also the peculiar 
political safety of our position as a power not signatory in that act, re- 
spectfully petitions that the same influence be exercised at once and 
vigorously, in order that the present systematic slavers', with the accom- 
panying cruelties and massacres, in the Congo region may be quickly 
abolished. 

ADDRESSES. 

Voted, To hear'the addresses of Rev. A. F. Pierce, of Brockton, and Rev. 
C. F. Carter, of Lexington, on the Dayton Council and Denominational 
Federation. 

These addresses were given, and at the close of Rev. Mr. 
Carter's address, the hymn, " For all the saints that from their 
labors rest," was sung. 



RESOLUTION ON POLITY. 

On recommendation of the Business Committee the follow- 
ing resolution, presented by the Committee on Polity, was 
assigned for discussion after the meeting of the Massachusetts 
Home Missionary' Society, in the afternoon: 

Resolved, That, in view of the present great diversity of judgment and 
plan, this whole matter of polity, inclusive of the subject of delegated 
representation, be committed to a committee of nine, representative of this 
Association; and that they be instructed to correspond with the individual 
churches, as well as the conferences, on one hand, and on the other, with 
the Committee on Polity of our National Council, and the Committee on 
Polity, appointed at Dayton by the Council of last February; and report 
at the annual meeting of 1907. 

The following resolution was presented for immediate dis- 
cussion: 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State Association rejoices that the 
Dayton Council has inaugurated movements toward the unity of the 
Methodist Protestants, the United Brethren, and the Congregationalists. 

r ThisJresolution"was discussed by Revs. Moxom, Hitchcock, 
Ainsworth, Enman, and Havward. It was then laid on the 
table. 

GREETINGS. 

On motion of the Nomination Committee, the committee to 
extend greetings to the New York Association was elected as 
follows: Rev. A. E. Cross, of Boston; Rev. Thomas Sims, of 
Melrose; C. A. Dennv, of Leicester. 



1906J Minutes 23 

The Association then took a recess until after the meeting 
of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, in the 
afternoon. 

Afternoon Session. 

The Association was called to order at 5.10 o'clock p.m., 
Vice-Moderator James Logan, of Worcester, in the chair. 

The recommendation of the Committee on Polity which was 
assigned to this hour was presented and adopted, thus consti- 
tuting a committee of nine on polity. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

On recommendation of the Business Committee, it was 

Voted, That the Executive Committee of this Association be instructed 
to consider the report of the special committee on the incorporation of the 
Association and be empowered to prepare a plan by which the advantages 
of incorporation may be secured through a board of trustees, as suggested 
by the report of the special committee; and to report at the next meeting 
of the Association. 

MINISTERIAL STANDING. 

Voted, That whenever a name is reported to the secretary by two 
ecclesiastical bodies that guard ministerial standing, he be instructed to 
call the attention of the bodies so reporting the name to this matter; and 
to recommend that such associations or conferences take action to rectify 
such irregularities and confusion in ministerial standing. 

RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY WITH CALIFORNIA BRETHREN. 

The Business Committee presented the following resolutions 
which were adopted : 

Whereas, The Massachusetts Association of Congregational Churches 
has learned with profound sorrow of the terrible calamity that has befallen 
the people of California; 

Resolved, That we extend to our brethren in California our heartfelt 
sympathy in their distress, and assure them of our practical cooperation 
in their efforts to reestablish their desolated churches. 

Resolved, That we recognize with gratitude and admiration the faith and 
courage with which the afflicted churches have met this disaster and are 
girding themselves for the heavy tasks of the future; and we are grateful, 
also, for the expressions of sympathy which this disaster has called forth. 

Resolved, That we "heartily commend the action of the Boston Congre- 
gational Club and the Boston Ministers' Meeting looking to the raising of 
a special fund for the relief of the stricken chuches of California, and we 
appeal to our Congregational churches of Massachusetts, always foremost 
in all good works, to contribute promptly and generously to this relief 
fund, that Congregationalists of Massachusetts may not be behind other 
Christian bodies in coming to the help of their burdened and needy brethren 
in California. 



24 Minutes [1906 

COMMITTEES. 

On motion of the Nominating Committee the following 
committees were elected: 

On Federation of Churches and Co-operation with Other Denominations 
in this State. —Rev. L. Clark Seelye, Northampton; Rev. W. V. W. 
Davis, Pittsfield: Rev. Reuen Thomas, Brookline; Rev. Wm. T. 
McElveen, Boston; Rev. F. E. Emrich, Boston; Rev. C. H. Oliphant, 
Methuen; J. P. Bates, Brookline; F. G. Cook, Cambridge; G. E. Copeland, 
Worcester; H. S. Conant, Boston; S. A. Holton, Falmouth; C. A. Brodeur, 
Westfield. 

On Evangelistic Work. — Rev. F. S. Hunnewell, Reading; Rev. Edwin 
N. Hard.v, Quincy; Rev. E. Victor Bigelow, Lowell; Rev. Richard Wright, 
Newbury port; P. L. Willis, Worcester. 

Auditors. — Franklin P. Shumway, Melrose; F. W. B. Pratt, Reading. 

Congregational Board of Pastoral Supply. — (To serve three years) Rev. 
W. H. Allbright, Dorchester; Rev. Frank W. Merrick, West Roxbury; 
Edward B. Bayley, Boston; Henry H. Proctor, Boston. 

Committee on Polity. — Rev. Albert E. Dunning, Boston; Rev. Calvin 
M. Clark, Haverhill; Rev. Charles F. Carter, Lexington; Rev. Wm. R. 
Campbell, Roxbury; Prof. John W. Platner, Andover; Rev. Philip S. 
Moxom, Springfield; Rev. A. W. Hitchcock, Worcester; Arthur S. John- 
son, Boston; Herbert A. Wilder, Newton. 

On Gambling. — William Shaw, Ballard vale; Arthur Wellman, Maiden; 
Rev. George F. Kenngott, Lowell. 

Member of Advisory Committee of General Theological Library. — Rev. 
F. E. Emrich, Boston. 

On Missionary Work. — Rev. C. H. Daniels, South Framingham; Rev. 
W. W. Jordan, Clinton; Rev. H. N. Hoyt, H;de Park; Rev. John J. 
Walker, Westboro; Walcott Johnson, Boston. 

Provisional Committee. — Rev. William C. Gordon, Westfield; Rev. 
Francis J. Marsh, Leominster; Rev. Newton M. Hall, Springfield; James 
C. Greenough, Westfield; Rev. George W. Winch, Holyoke. 



BUSINESS. 

Voted, That the Dayton resolution be taken from the table and referred 
to a special committee of three, who shall report after the addresses in the 
evening. 

On motion of Rev. S. A. Norton, of Woburn, it was 

Voted, That the Association send a message to the Pacific Coast Congre- 
gational Congress, now in session. 

On motion, Rev. Mr. Norton and the moderator were ap- 
pointed to prepare this message. 

On motion of the Business Committee it was 

Voted, To accept the invitation of the Second Church. Westfield, to hold 
the next annual session of the Association with them. 



1906] Minutes 25 

The following named persons were elected special committee 
on the Dayton resolution: Rev. D. S. Clark, Salem; Rev. J. L. 
Sewall, Randolph; Rev. J. G. Taylor, Arlington Heights. 

On motion of the Business Committee, Rev. C. M. Southgate, 
of Newtonville, was given three minutes to speak in behalf of 
the Massachusetts Bible Society. 

The Association then took a recess until 7.30 p.m. 

Evening Session. 

The evening session of Wednesday was opened at 7.30 
o'clock by a devotional service in which the scripture was read 
by Rev. J. T. Stocking, of Newtonville, and prayer was offered 
by Rev. C. W. Merriam, of Greenfield. 

The hymn, " I love thy kingdom, Lord," was sung. 

An address was given by President Mary E. Woolley, of 
Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, on the subject, " Rela- 
tion of the College to the Training of the Public Conscience." 

The hymn, " Jesus shall reign where'er the sun," was sung. 

An address on " Permanent Evangelism " was delivered by 
Rev. G. A. Gordon, of Boston. 

The hymn, " All hail the power of Jesus' name," was sung, 
after which the Association went into business session, the 
moderator in the chair. 



DAYTON RESOLUTION. 

The report of the special committee on the Dayton resolu- 
tion was called and presented by Rev. J. L. Sewall, of Randolph. 

The following is the report, which, without debate, was 
carried unanimously: 

Resolved, That we express our hearty sympathy with, and approval of, 
the movement represented by the Dayton Council toward the organic union 
of the Congregational, United Brethren, and Methodist Protestant denomi- 
nations. We further express the hope that a wise and harmonious result 
of these deliberations may be reached under the guidance of the Spirit of 
God, whose presence in remarkable measure pervaded that body. 



BUSINESS. 

On motion of the Business Committee, it was 

Voted, That the General Association of the Congregational Churches of 
Massachusetts authorizes its Industrial Committee at its discretion, to 
represent the Association before committees of the General Court in regard 
to bills relating to industrial questions where moral issues are involved. 



26 Minutes [1906 

ACTION ON PROPOSED AMENDMENT. 

The Business Committee presented for action the proposed 
amendment (1905) to the Constitution, relative to the election 
of the Nominating Committee by the conferences. 

It was voted to lay the amendment on the table. 

The benediction was pronounced by Rev. G. A. Gordon, of 
Boston, and at 9.23 o'clock the Association took a recess until 
8.45 o'clock Thursday morning. 



THURSDAY. 
Morning Session. 

The closing session on Thursday morning was opened at 
S.45 o'clock, by a devotional service led by Rev. J. E. Enman, 
of Fall River. 

At 9 o'clock the Association was called to order by the 
moderator. 

The following telegram from the New York Association was 
read : 

The Empire State Congregationalists rejoice in the reception of the 
fraternal message from their brethren of the Pilgrim home and affection- 
ately return greetings with best wishes for the coming year. 

SHELTON BISSELL, Scribe. 



The minutes of the proceedings of the previous day were 
read and accepted. 

On motion of the Business Committee it was 

Voted, To give H. S. Conant, general secretary of the Massachusetts 
Sunday School Association, five minutes tu speak of the Summer School 
at Northfield. 

APPORTIONMENT OF EXPENSES. 

On motion of the Budget Committee it was 

Voted, That the churches be requested to contribute through the treas- 
urers of their conferences for the expenses of the General Association a 
sum equivalent to five cents for each member, based upon the total mem- 
bership of January 1, 1906, and that the treasurers of the conferences be 
requested to bring this matter before their conferences at their fall meetings, 
and to forward the amounts collected as soon as possible to the treasurer. 

Voted, That a proportionate part of the expenses of the Massachusetts 
Federation of Churches legitimately falling to the churches of our denomi- 
nation in this state be included in the Budget of this Association, viz.: 
S445.00 covering the time from Jan. 1, 1906, to May 1, 1907. 



1906] Minutes 27 

Rev. C. B. Rice, of Danvers, secretary of the Board of 
Pastoral Supply, read the annual report for that body. This 
was accepted and its recommendation referred to the Business 
Committee. 

BUSINESS. 

The annual election of officers was ordered and the following 
tellers appointed : Rev. P. H. Epler, of Worcester; Rev. J. E. 
Enman, of Fall River, and Rev. Richard Wright, of Newbury - 
port. 

On motion of the Nominating Committee, Rev. J. G. Taylor, 
Arlington Heights, was substituted on the Committee on Polity 
for Rev. A. W. Hitchcock, resigned. 

On motion of the Business Committee, it was ordered that 
a committee of three be appointed to prepare and submit at 
the next annual meeting suitable forms or models of organic 
union between neighboring churches. 

On motion of the Nominating Committee, the following- 
persons were elected as the above named committee: Rev. 
A. W. Hitchcock, of Worcester; Rev. T. E. Babb, of Holden; 
Hon. Frederick Fosdick, of Fitchburg. 

On motion the following minute was passed : 

The Massachusetts General Association of Congregational Churches, in 
annual session at Worcester, sends sympathy and loving greetings to Rev. 
Lyman Whiting, D.D., of East Charlemont, our oldest pastor in service, 
whose presence and counsels we miss from our gathering. 

Voted. That the Publishing Committee be authorized to print such 
papers as in their judgment are desirable. 



VOTE- OF THANKS. 

On motion of the Business Committee, the following resolu- 
tions of thanks, presented by Rev. W. J. Batt, of Concord, was 
adopted : 

Whereas, The Massachusetts General Association of Congregational 
Churches is now concluding its one hundred and fourth annual meeting, 
held in the Central Church in the city of Worcester, a meeting which we 
are confident will be memorable in this long series of meetings: 

Resolved, That our sincere thanks are due and are hereby expressed to 
the Central Church and to its honored pastor, Rev. A. W. Hitchcock, and 
to the families of the congregation and to the people of this greatly favored 
city. 

We would gladly include in this expression of our gratitude the efficient 
committees which have aided in the laborious preparations for our coming, 
—the choir, the railroads that have offered us reduced fares, the hotels 
that have sheltered and favored us, the newspapers that have circulated 



28 ^ Minutes [1906 

so widely full and friendly reports of our proceedings, the Young Men's 
Christian Association that offered us the freedom of their rooms, and the 
officers of the Art Museum who also offered all possible privileges. 



RESULT OF BALLOTS. 

The tellers reported the result of ballots for officers and 
Executive Committee, and the following persons were declared 
elected;. 

Moderator. — Charles N. Prouty, of Spencer. 

Vice-Moderator. — '■ Rev. Samuel C. Bushnell, of Arlington. 

Registrar. — Rev. Francis J. Marsh, of Leominster. 

Assistant Registrar. — Rev. Almon J. Dyer, of Sharon. 

Other Members oj the Executive Committee. - — Rev. Charles L. Xoyes, of 
Somerville; Rev. Winfred C. Rhoades, of Roxbury; Herbert R. Gibbs, 
of Newtonville. 

By vote of the Association, Rev. E. T. Root, secretary of the 
Massachusetts Federation of Churches, spoke briefly concerning 
his work. 

Rev. C. F. Swift, of Fall River, then delivered the closing 
address of the meeting on " The Method and the Man." 

On motion of the Business Committee, it was 

Voted, To change the name of the Committee on Federation of Churches 
to Committee on Federation of Churches and on Cooperation with other 
Denominations in this State. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE OX CREDEXTIALS. 

The Committee on Credentials reported as follows: 

Whole number of churches represented 255 

By delegate only 48 

By pastor only 101 

By pastor and delegate 106 

Conferences represented 12 

Associations represented 8 

Officers 5 

2S0 
This report was accepted. 
On motion of Ff. S. Conant, it was 

Resolved, That, in view of the very great courtesy and efficiency of 
our moderator during the sessions of this meeting of the Association, we 
place on record our great appreciation of his ability and service; and 
that the other officers be included also in this "expression of our 
appreciation. 



1906] Minutes 29 

A brief response to this motion was made by the moderator. 

The minutes of the session thus far were read and accepted 
and the registrar was authorized to complete the minutes. 

Prayer was offered by the moderator, the hymn, " Blest be 
the tie that binds," was 'sung, and the Association adjourned 
without day. 

EDWARD M. NOYES, 

Moderator, 
FRANCIS J. MARSH, Registrar. 
ALMON J. DYER, Assistant Registrar. 

The following telegram was received after the close of the 
meeting: 

Dubuque, Iowa, May 17, 1906. 
To Congregational State Association, Worcester, Mass.: 

Congregational State Association of Iowa joins in prayer and efforts for 
the Kingdom. 1 Cor. 15: 58. 

J. H. OLMSTEAD, Scribe. 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF AUDITORS. 



The auditors would also call the attention of the Association to the fact 
that, although the Executive Committee voted, " To request that all the 
committees of the Association return reports of all money received and 
expended by them, and voted that full reports of such money appear in 
the Treasurer's Report," the treasurer reports to the auditors that he has 
not received such reports from any of the committees of the Association, 
and, therefore, could not embody them in his report. 

The auditors recommend that the treasurer be requested to furnish the 
Association each year, with his Annual Report, a statement showing the 
amount charged to each conference at the beginning of the year, the 
amounts paid on same during the year, the balances due at end of year, 
with any information he may have as to why the amount charged has 
not been paid in full; and that he also furnish the Association a statement 
showing the total assets and liabilities of the Association on May 1 of 
each year. 

We recommend that the churches be requested to contribute through 
the treasurers of their conferences for the expenses of the General Associa- 
tion, a sum equivalent to five cents for each member, based upon the total 
membership of January 1, 1906, and that the treasurers of the conferences 
be requested to bring this matter before their conferences at their October 
meeting, and to forward the amounts collected as soon as possible to the 
treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 



From the numbering of our Israel for the year of grace 1905 we glean 
the following results for this report: The number of churches is 612; they 
have a total membership of 117,471. There are 100,371 families. The 
membership of the Sunday schools is 123,326, and of the various societies 
of young people 30,121. The sum of the reported benevolence is $603,909. 

There are changes in our family to note: One church, the Union, of 
North Brookfield, has been dissolved; two, the First and Third of Chelsea, 
have been consolidated; the John Street Church, Lowell, has "a name 
to live " in our register, but has dismissed all its members. Four new 
names appear on our rolls for the first time this year: The French Church, 
Pittsfield, the church at Nahant, the Swedish Church of Cambridge and the 
Second Church, Winchester. The French Church of Pittsfield was organ- 
ized in 1903 and should have been reported before. The church at Nahant 
was organized in 1850 in another fellowship and was recognized as a Con- 
gregational church last October. The Swedish Church of Cambridge is 
new, and the Second of Winchester is brand-new, having been organized 
since January of this year. We place its name on the roll of the churches, 
but wait another season to add its numbers to our membership. 

In three important particulars there has been gain in 1905: There has 
been a gain in benevolence of SI, 279 over the preceding year. There has 
been a gain in the membership of the Sunday schools of 2,481 over the 
previous year. There has been a gain in membership of the churches 
of 840 over the previous year. The largest enrollment of our Sunday- 
schools was in 1898. If the Sunday schools gain less than 1,000 members 
in 1906, the enrollment January 1, 1907, will exceed the largest ever 
before reported. 

The changes in the membership of the churches by admissions mark 
this as a year of unusual increase. The total additions in 1905 are 7,175. 
The additions by confession of faith, 4,094, are the largest additions thus 
received since 1895. There were 231 churches that received additions 
by confession and letter of ten or more members, and of this number 19 
churches received additions of 50 or more. The five years since 1850 
which show the largest accessions to the churches of this Association 
are 1877, 1878, 1895, 1S9S and 1905. The year 1905 ranks fourth in this 
group of fruitful years in its additions by confession, and third in its addi- 
tions by letter and in its total additions. 

The Secretary would call attention to the fact that a few ministers 
are reported as members of two Congregational bodies within our state 
that guard ministerial standing. In most cases one report comes from 
an association and the other from a conference. Will the Association 



1906] Report of the Treasurer 31 

instruct the Secretary how to deal with such names in the printing of 
the " Minutes "1 

The Association's file of Annual Minutes is still incomplete. Copies 
issued previous to 1885 are needed. Rev. John J. Walker of Westboro 
presented three copies to the Association. Other contributions to the 
missing numbers of our file are solicited. 

COLLINS G. BURNHAM, Secretary. 



•REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

HENRY P. EMERSON, Treasurer, in account with the GENERAL ASSOCIATION 
OF CONGREGATIONAL CHURCHES OF MASSACHUSETTS 

For the Year Ending May 1, 1906 

receipts 
1905-1906. 

To cash on hand at last report SS76.70 

Receipts from Conference 5,000.33 

Interest . 9.16 

Rev. C. B. Rice, Board of Pastoral Supply 1,067.82 

Copy of " Minutes " .30 

Total S6.954.31 

1905-1906. EXPENDITURES 

By Rev. Samuel B. Forbes, National Congregational Council SI, 749. 46 

Rev. Collins G. Burnham, salary 687.50 

stationery, etc 60.36 

Rev. A. J. Dyer, expenses attending annual meeting 2.54 

Rev. Parris T. Farwell, committee on labor organization 5.00 

Samuel Usher, printing 656.34 

Pilgrim Press, printing 19.40 

Postage 3.30 

G. W. Andrews, stationery for conference 8.74 

Lillian D. Powers, copying missionary report 2.22 

David Evans, work at Conference 18.50 

Middlesex Odd Fellows Building Association, rent of hall 15.00 

Adams Express Company, sending "Minutes" 81.06 

Insurance 9.00 

Charles A. Ratcliffe, committee on missionary work 2.76 

Rev. S. F. Hunnewell, committee on state missionary work 2.80 

Rev. Francis J. Marsh, expenses, etc 8.15 

Rev. C. B. Rice, Secretary Board of Pastoral Supply 3,084.44 

Cash on hand 537.74 

Total 86,954.31 



HENRY P. EMERSON, Treasurer. 

The Auditing Committee of the General Association of Congregational Churches of 
Massachusetts have examined the accounts of the Treasurer, Henry P. Emerson, 
and find them correct with proper vouchers; showing a balance of §537.74 in his hands 
and deposited in the Beacon Trust Company. 

Franklin P. Shumwat, 
Joseph H. Currier, 

Auditing Committee. 



REPORT OF THE CONGREGATIONAL BOARD OF 
PASTORAL SUPPLY 

REV. CHARLES B. RICE, SECRETARY 
CONGREGATIONAL HOUSE, BOSTON, MASS. 



The Congregational Board of Pastoral Supply respectfully submits its 
twelfth annual report. 

The Directors have held six meetings during the year. They have given 
attention to the work of the office so far as concerns the general rules by 
which it is conducted, and they have become acquainted with its details 
to the extent of what is practicable or desirable. They are assured that 
the office under their direction is fully mindful of its complete responsibility 
to the General Association and to the churches represented in it. 

We have rendered service during the year to 1S9 churches. Of these 
there were in Massachusetts, 94: in Maine, 15; in New Hampshire, 32; 
in Vermont, 14; in Rhode Island, 3; in Connecticut, 6; in New York, 6; 
in Pennsylvania, 2; in North Carolina, 1; in Maryland, 1; in the District 
of Columbia, 1; in Florida, 4: in Ohio, 1; in Iowa, 2; in Kansas, 1; in 
Utah, 1; in Idaho, 2; in Oregon, 2; and in Washington, 1. 

We count here nothing except that which has been done in direct 
response to requests from persons officially representing the churches. 
The number would be increased if we were to count, as we do not, inquiries 
from persons — members of churches or friends of members — who have 
no official authority. Business in the furnishing of occasional or temporary 
supplies is not included. It is not meant that pastoral settlements answer- 
ing to this number of churches have been directly brought about through 
the work of our office, but that official consultations relative to the filling 
of the pastorate have been had to the extent stated. 

The whole number' of churches thus making use of our office is larger 
than in any preceding year with but one exception. The number of 
actual settlements in which we have had an important share has been 64. 
This number is less than in two or three former years. The reason for the 
falling off is chiefly, if not wholly, in the increasing difficulty of finding 
men for the smaller churches. 

Of the whole number of churches conferring with us there were 38 
having a membership of over 300; 55 having a membership of from 100 
to 300; and 96 with a membership of less than 100. Of these churches 
27 pay a salary of more than $2,000; 5S a salary of between $1,000 and 
$2,000; and 104 a salary of less than $1,000. The rental of the parsonage 



1906] Report of Board of Pastoral Supply 33 

is included. The proportion of larger churches conferring with our office 
has increased year by year, and it is now fully equal to the ratio of such 
churches to the whole number of churches making pastoral changes. 

On the first of May the number of churches in Massachusetts that were 
without pastors was 35. This is about the average number for recent 
years, but very much less than the usual number before the opening of 
our office. It should be noted that our reckonings may differ from those 
of the Secretary of the General Association. His accounting is properly 
from an ecclesiastical point of view, and it may have respect often to the 
action of the council in dissolving, or failing to dissolve, the pastoral rela- 
tion; and it may not regard arrangements whose permanency is not 
officially assured or reported. Our enumeration is for direct working 
purposes and follows closely the changing conditions of which we have 
need to be carefully informed. 

Opportunities for preaching have been furnished directly from our 
office to 189 men; and of these 96 were candidates for settlement. In 
many cases these opportunities were several times repeated. The whole 
number of occasional supplies furnished was 341. This does not include 
the preaching of candidates, nor of men who have supplied for a limited 
but considerable period of time in one place, nor the preaching of the 
Secretary. 

The Secretary has preached on forty-five Sundays during the year. 
The number is smaller than has been usual. In the early part of the 
year, in the months of May and June, there were "four Sundays on which 
no opportunities for preaching were offered — a very uncommon occur- 
rence. The Secretary was absent for three Sundays in the early fall upon 
a trip to the western coast, with leave heartily given by the Directors. 
His longest absence before was for eight days in one instance, and besides 
that it had never been for more than six days during the twelve years since 
the opening of the office. The preaching of the Secretary is in part in 
connection with his visiting the churches that have no pastors, to become 
acquainted with the situation and to confer with the committees. Aside 
from this, and in so far as it is in the way of the ordinary supplying of 
pulpits for pay, it has been for the purpose of assisting a little in the 
support of the office and of relieving to that extent the burden that falls 
upon the churches. But it enters into the thoughts of the Secretary that 
this mode of indirect taxation may prove more grievous than direct assess- 
ment! The work of Sunday is often not light, involving, besides the 
ordinary services, prolonged conferences with committees. It has been 
the habit of the Secretary, in theory, to take a half day for rest, or for 
some other kind of work, during the week when thus busied on Sundays. 
But during the last six months of the year he was not absent except upon 
business connected with the office for a single half day, saving only the 
legal holidays. During the coming summer months, however, he pur- 
poses to devote the half days strictly to the raising of fruits and vege- 



34 Report of Board of Pastoral Supply [1906 

tables. These things are spoken of only that it may be understood that 
the obligations of carefulness and diligence are not forgotten. The bread 
which the Secretary eats at the expense of the churches is not the bread 
of idleness, though in another light it may appear to the churches as the 
bread of affliction. 

The purpose of economy has been always in the minds of the Directors 
and of those in charge of the office from the first. It has appeared in the 
smallness of the room that has been rented for our use; in its furnishing 
and equipment almost entirely without cost to the churches; and in many 
other particulars that might be mentioned if it were needful to do it. 

At its last meeting the Association, upon the recommendation of the 
Budget Committee, added $200 to the appropriation for our Board to 
be used in providing metallic filing cases or in the copying of papers and 
records. Upon full examination it was not judged advisable to procure 
the cases. The copying has been carried on with great advantage as to 
convenience and the business efficiency of the office. The work has been 
much forwarded and its cost lessened through the readiness and capacity 
of the Secretary's assistant. 

The copying is more than half finished at an outlay of less than half 
the sum appropriated. We should be glad to be allowed to use, during 
the coming year, so much of the unexpended balance as may be needed 
to complete the work. 

Our financial account, "as reported to the Treasurer of the Association, 
is as follows: 

RECEIPTS 

Preaching bv the Secretary §545.00 

Office fees " 565.79 

Rebate on rent 46. 5S 

Telephone charges refunded 3.69 

Special gift 1.00 

Sale of stamps (to Evangelistic Committee) 5.01 

Received from Treasurer of General Association . . . 2,196. S6 

S3.363.93 

EXPENSES 

Postage S72.00 

Telephone and telegraph 47.75 

Awning, office repairs and sundries 11.90 

Record books and stationery 25. S3 

Printing and binding 11.53 

Advertising 31.80 

Traveling expenses 109.02 

Rent and care of room 361.20 

Assistant's salary 600.00 

Additional office help (including copying records) . . 92.90 

I Secretary's salary 2,000.00 

S3.363.93 



1906] Report of Board of Pastoral Supply 35 

The net cost of our Board to the churches, apart from the special matter 
of copying above referred to, would be about S2,100, and we recommend 
that provision be made for the support of the Board for the ensuing year 
upon the same basis. It will be seen that the cost of the Board is less than 
two cents for each member of our churches throughout the state, and not 
three cents, as has been sometimes supposed. 

The correspondence connected with the work of the Evangelistic Com- 
mittee of the Association has been carried on through our office without 
extra expense except for printing and postage. 

The matter of fees or commissions for services rendered by the office 
has been repeatedly and carefully considered by the Directors. Under 
the present arrangement, which has held with little change for several 
years, fees are charged for the furnishing of all occasional supplies, for all 
supplying with reference to settlement outside of Massachusetts, for all 
pastoral settlements actually made outside the state, and for all supplying 
with reference to settlement in Massachusetts by ministers living outside 
the state; while no charge is made to Massachusetts ministers for oppor- 
tunities to supply with reference to settlement within the state, and while 
for pastoral settlements actually effected in the state of Massachusetts 
no charge is ever made. 

The Secretary has been allowed some liberty, within narrow limits, in 
the remitting or lessening of these fees, as when a minister has gone a 
long distance to preach as a candidate for small pay, he being himself in 
such circumstances as to make even a slight relief most welcome. The 
Directors have felt sure that our churches would not disapprove of this 
measure of consideration. During the year there was committed to the 
Secretary, from a most worthy source, ten dollars to be used by him for 
the relief of ministers in the payment of office fees. The money went, as 
with all fees, to the Treasury of the Association, though not coming from 
the ministers thus relieved. Nothing, scarcely, has given to the Secretary 
more satisfaction than the being allowed to use in such a way even this 
moderate sum. The times when ministers are looking for settlement are 
often trying times. If any one should wish to fill again, or to enlarge, this 
small store for special relief in the payment of fees, the provision would be 
most gratefully received. 

The difficulty of finding pastors for the smaller churches has continued, 
or even increased. We have often had upon our lists at one time as many 
as eight or ten such churches for which we could make no immediate pro- 
vision, or, perhaps, no' provision at all. Many of these churches have been 
outside of Massachusetts, for the proportion of the weaker churches is 
greater in the states at the north than with us. Yet in our own state the 
difficulty is serious. There was appointed a sub-committee of the Board, 
consisting of Rev. Calvin M. Clark, Rev. F. E. Emrich and Mr. Frank L. 
Fish, to whom the whole matter was referred for consideration. The 
committee prepared a list of questions covering many features of the 



36 Report of Board of Pastoral Supply [1906 

case which -was sent to a large number of men whose judgment would be 
likely to be valuable. The replies disclosed a great variety and a consid- 
erable divergence of opinion. The committee submitted to the Board a 
careful analysis of the mass of matter received with the general conclusion 
that relief is to be looked for chiefly In two directions: First, by the 
further uniting or yoking of churches, and, second, by unions or combina- 
tions between churches of different denominations — a subject which is 
beginning to engage wide attention. 

The policy of uniting two churches under the care of one man has long 
been favored and pressed by our Massachusetts Home Missionary Society. 
The matter comes under our notice as concerned for the supply of pastors. 
The obstacles in the way of these unions are often stronger in anticipation 
or in imagination than in reality. To be furnished with a minister for 
but a part of the time, or, as it is often expressed, " to be furnished with 
but part of a minister," is looked upon as an indignity and as a denial 
of some natural right. Such an impression ought to be wholly removed. 

There should be prepared, we think, an authorized or regular form or 
frame of union between two churches, making them for certain purposes 
to be as one church. Such a model or form of a constitutional, organic 
union of churches should have its place in our Congregational system. 
The establishment or existence of such a union would then cease to be a 
thing abnormal or unusual, and would the sooner be regarded as a fitting 
result of fellowship and a natural source of strength. It would not be 
difficult to frame such a constitution of organic union. There should be 
provision for the manner of its establishment or its termination with the 
counsel of the churches of the neighborhood or conference. The form 
should fix the mode of procedure in all matters relating to the settlement, 
the support and the dismissal of the pastor; it should have a place for the 
determining the proportion of time and pastoral service that should be 
given to each church — or each division of the one body; it should pro- 
pose the appointment of the needful committees and should suggest the 
various steps that might be taken for mutual reporting, or visiting, and 
counseling; and it should add a special form for the returns to be made for 
the " Minutes " of the Association; and all to the intent that for many, if 
not for most, purposes there should be one body and not two, and that the 
sense of loyalty and of strength should be gathered greatly about the one 
united body. It may be that in some cases one church should be organized 
as a branch of the other, becoming thus one with it; and for such a union 
there should also be a constitutional form. So, with their places set and 
their orbits fixed, we might have in our Congregational skies binary stars 
in larger numbers, shining with a steadier and clearer light. 

We recommend that the Association appoint a committee with instruc- 
tions to prepare and submit at the next annual meeting suitable forms 
or models of organic union between neighboring churches. 

Frequent reference has been made in former reports to the demand 



1906] Report of Board of Pastoral Supply 37 

among our churches for young men in the pastorate. The demand does 
not abate. It is most persistent and strong with the churches that are 
smallest. The smaller the church the younger often must be its pastor. 
There are real advantages of youth that are not to be slighted. It may 
be that there is a reality of failure among ministers who are not young, 
and that there are possibly, sometimes, disqualifications with them that 
ought not to exist. The advantages of youth are thought to be in activity, 
in hopefulness, in quickness of sympathy and in readiness of receptivity 
towards new thoughts and methods. The most of these, though belong- 
ing the more naturally it may be with youth, are appropriate spiritual 
products of the Christian life itself, and they should be found in their 
choicest forms with ministers of ripening years. The man who leads in a 
Christian church should make it sure that the abiding Christian things, 
faith, hope and love, with their accompanying sensibilities and graces, do 
not fail to abide and abound with himself. Even as to activity, though it 
may miss in age the spontaneous movement of youth, yet it ought not to 
miss the efficiency that comes with practice, and the sustaining power that 
lies in a firm and steady purpose. The complaint somtimes made that 
ministers slight their work as they grow old ought never to be heard, or 
it ought never to have any good reason for being heard. There are pastors 
of our churches, and pastors of our smaller churches, concerning whom 
such complaints are not made, and upon whom all the genuine graces of 
youth are flourishing. If this were true of all who are in the ministry the 
pastorates of our smaller churches would be more readily and happily 
filled. These things are spoken no otherwise than in sincere and affection- 
ate solicitude. 

Special effort is made in our office to open fields of labor to the older 
men. This effort has been increased of late and with some good results. 

It is probable, too, that our young ministers might very well take small 
churches more frequently than they do. It is indeed, perhaps, too much 
to expect that a young man should choose the smaller of two churches 
when he might have the larger; yet the beginning with the smaller might 
not seldom be an advantage in reality to himself, besides the benefit it 
might bring to the church thus served. 

The importance of the place of work with its outward conditions may 
often be overestimated with respect to its effect on the growth of minis- 
terial power. It is not uncommon for ministers, especially the younger 
men, in giving their reasons for seeking a change of pastorate to say that 
they " desire a place that will bring out the best that is in them." The 
phrase has become somewhat familiar. It has a certain ground in reason, 
yet it often involves a misapprehension of the facts and powers of life. 
We are not mostly too large for our places; our places are mostly too large 
for us. And it is not the business of the world or of any portion of it to 
draw out what may be in us, as by a pump. It is our business to refresh 
the earth ourselves what we can, as by springs of living water. 



3S Report of Board of Pastoral Supply [1906 

The pump, too, if that is depended upon, may often suck and fail 
to bring out clear water. As to appreciation by others, in a land of widely 
circulating intelligence it seldom wholly or greatly fails; and it is besides 
the surpassing glory of the Christian ministry that its chosen appreciations 
and honors are of God. 

There is a natural desire for settlement in prosperous and growing com- 
munities. One young man wrote to us, from outside Xew England, defin- 
ing explicitly the kind of field for which he was looking and to which he 
thought himself adapted. He wanted a church " on a line of railroad 
between Boston and Xew York, in a rather large town, and a place sure 
to grow." He wanted greatness of a certainty to flow in upon him. It 
is desirable indeed to be in a growing place, but a very large proportion of 
our ministers are in places not growing as to Congregational population. 
Among them are many of the best men, and the work they do is of the 
very best that is anywhere done. 

We have much knowledge in our office of the trying features of minis- 
terial service. But even thus it can be said with earnestness, and it ought 
to be said, that by far the larger part of our brethren in the ministry are 
happy in their work and useful and prosperous in life and character. For 
this larger part their relations with the churches they serve are kindly and 
gracious. Pastoral settlements, too, are usually accomplished without 
very great delays and almost always without serious disturbances. And 
even the closing of pastorates is commonly effected with thoughtfulness 
on either side and in a temper not unbecoming to the membership of a 
Christian household. It has been pleasant to witness these things. We 
are thankful for the opportunity to contribute something toward the com- 
fortable and effective adjustment of these pastoral relations. And we 
are grateful to the churches and their ministers for their continuing support 
and continuing patience. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE WORK 
OF THE CHURCHES 



The value of this report will be its frankness. Its failure will be evident 
in the fact that no amount of statistics, however carefully compiled, can 
adequately tell of the faithful, protective, quiet work of the people and 
pastors; only God knows. Yet in a tentative way the general tone of 
religious life can be known and considerable advantage accrue as the result 
of inquiry and reply. That is the hope of the Committee. They, at least, 
have been benefited, and desire to thank heartily the brethren for their 
uniformly courteous and painstaking answers. Some of them have for- 
warded carefully written letters in addition to the circular of questions 
sent them. 

Churches have characteristics. The community has not a little to do 
with the successful working of a church. One church is able to produce 
more direct results than another. No one church, however, can fairly be 
compared in its- work or methods with another. Each from its environ- 
ment must determine its duty to the community in the name of the Master. 

THE HOPE OF THE CHURCH 

Eight questions were submitted to the churches, as follows: 

First, (a) Has the Sunday school been successful in holding scholars 
between the ages of sixteen and twenty-five? If so, how? 

The activities of our young people are encouraging. Aside from a 
tendency of the scholars of the Sunday school to neglect the morning 
service, the general work in the school is successful. Almost all acknowl- 
edge a partial failure to hold pupils between the ages of sixteen and 
twenty-five." There are notable exceptions. Some solutions are offered, 
but the successful schools in this respect are those which have faithful 
teachers. Few seem to understand that a class in the Bible school fur- 
nishes a life opportunity next to the influence of a parent. There are 
hundreds of hard-working, devoted teachers. In Adams, over a hundred 
have been added to the school through the Home Department. There 
have been successful organizations of large classes of young men and ladies 
under competent leaders. A King Arthur Castle, King's Daughters' 
Circle and athletic associations have been successful, but the personal 
element is the key. " Here the battle is fought, won or lost." 

(6) Is the Christian Endeavor Society doing faithful and progressive 
work in the Junior, Intermediate and Senior Departments? 

With some exceptions, the Christian Endeavor Society is doing steady 



40 Report on the Work of the Churches [1906 

work throughout the state. This is especially true of the senior and junior 
societies, although the latter are not so numerous. There are few inter- 
mediate societies. Yet there is manifestly need of interesting the boys 
and girls between the ages of the junior and senior societies. The training 
school of Christian Endeavor should be adjusted to growing boys and 
girls. In many instances, however, the step from junior to senior, say 
thirteen to sixteen years, can be taken without any intermediate society. 
" We have a junior leader who is irresistible." That is the battle won. 
Some young people's societies in the state are not affiliated with Christian 
Endeavor, but the large majority of them seem to profit by the conven- 
tions and fellowship. The assertion of one Boston pastor appears to be 
generally sustained: "The Endeavor Society still proves the best answer 
to the Young People's question ever yet given." 

THE WORLD-WIDE COMMAND 

Second. Is the missionary interest in your church maintaining a normal 
standing or is it increasing? 

The large majority say that it is increasing. The campaign of educa- 
tion is beginning to tell. In some cases, the contributions have doubled 
and trebled. One has increased seventy-nine per cent over an average 
for ten years. Men are contributing who formerly had no belief in missions. 
Many churches have the advantage of supporting a representative on the 
foreign field, a Bible woman, or orphan in India, or a missionary pastor. 
The young people are giving generously along this line, and are taught the 
value of systematic giving. There is no discrimination between Home and 
Foreign Missions, — they are equally important. Mission Study Classes, 
Home Tourist Clubs, Outlook Meetings, have been popular. The Campello 
church and others have suggestive statements of the yearly work of the 
church. 

According to Secretary Dr. Asher Anderson, Massachusetts has more 
Congregational churches of foreign descent than any other state in the 
Union: two Finnish, one Armenian, six French, two German, .two Italian, 
thirteen Swedish, three Scandinavian, two Bohemian, — thirty-one in all. 
Connecticut has twenty-one, Ohio twenty-seven. The leaven is at work. 
In some places, the missionary concert is revived with profit. There is a 
growing desire to know more about missions. 

SOMETHING TO GALVANIZE 

Third, (a) How have you met the problem of the prayer meeting and 
the Sunday evening service? 

There is doubt if this question should ever be put in the same way again. 
Is there really any prayer-meeting problem? The meetings are largely the 
same as they always have been. Some churches strong in the evangelistic 
spirit have an attendance of from 70 to 100 or 125. One pastor comments. 
" It goes hard, but it goes," and adds, " It takes the heart out of a man more 



1906] Report on the Work of the Churches 41 

than anything else." Another says, " We make it interesting by variety." 
Another, one of the largest in the state, uses the same old-fashioned method, • 
prayer, praise and testimony, — " no new, special, strange, unusual, 
unique, spectacular methods being employed." The pastors are eager for 
the success of this meeting, even to " trying everything except standing 
on my head," as one put it. Others assert that it is the layman's meeting 
and the responsibility rests largely there. Requesting a deacon or layman 
to lead occasionally has proved helpful. As to topics, some use the 
" Congregationalist Handbook," the golden text of the coming Sunday- 
school lesson, denominational history or subjects adapted to special ends. 
In Adams and North Adams, also, the church " calls the roll of members at 
the prayer meeting in sections of about twenty-five." Valuable helpers 
have been " rounded up " by this plan. A ten or fifteen minute social 
may follow the meeting, sometimes with light refreshments. Formality is 
the enemy to scout. 

Perhaps it is a wise conclusion to reach that, without over-urging people 
to come, it be quietly said, "Any who desire to pray, let them come." 
Blessed is that church which believes in and sustains at whatever worldly 
sacrifice its weekly prayer service. 

(b) The history of the Sunday evening service is the history of a people 
becoming better informed by the public prints than years ago, and the 
proneness in prosperity to forget God and our brother man. The morn- 
ing service may properly be attended for one's own bodily and mental rest 
and spiritual refreshment. The evening service has lost its hold in many 
places, nine tenths, one pastor thinks, because the people do not realize 
the necessity of the unsaved and seek to win them to Christ. Dr. Dawson 
thought it was a mistake to substitute the afternoon service for the evening. 
If two thirds or one half of Christian people would attend the evening 
service, in an unselfish spirit, the world would fill the church. Many of the 
churches are successful in holding fair and sometimes large evening congre- 
gations. This is often and mainly determined by locality. Yet one of 
the most studious and hardworking pastors of one of the largest churches in 
Greater Boston has written, " The second or evening service takes more 
life out of a man than anything else he does. The majority of the church 
people feel no responsibility for the service. The rise and fall of numbers 
is determined by the weather (alas!), the rival attractions elsewhere and 
special features of the service." Except for special occasions, as " ves- 
pers " once a month, a number of churches have relinquished their second 
service, or " telescoped " it with an evening devoted to the young people, 
frequently the Christian Endeavor Society or Young People's Alliance. 
One successful pastor in Worcester has two classes of young people Sunday 
evenings. " Each year there are some who give themselves to Christ, 
and all are given a strong impulse Christward." The total attendance is 
large. Grace Church, Holyoke, has a commendable spirit. Its pastor 
writes, " The Sunday evening problem has been to look out for the people 



42 Report on the Work of the Churches [1906 

who attended. Have had people standing and even turned away. For 
several years have planned each Sunday night service weeks ahead. The 
lantern at least every third Sunday night, and we get the best speakers 
we can lay hold of. Various organizations of the church have charge of 
various nights." In the average church the conditions are problematic 
with an attempt at " pleasant Sunday evening service "; an orchestra or 
vested choir of young people successful where permanently possible, and 
where " a few people demand evening service and it is maintained for those 
few " and where there is " no good music provided." Practical themes are 
earnestly treated, with " as much cheer and hope as possible," but often 
with unsatisfactory results. 

ELIGIBLE FOR MATRIMONY 

Fourth. Has it been possible and advisable for your church to set aside 
the parish and church system and become a corporate body? 

Some churches are not ready for the change; others are patiently wait- 
ing for it; others, a small minority, think it not advisable; others are say- 
ing that the incorporated church works " excellently well " and has 
" proved a blessing." Some are enthusiastic about it. In parishes wher.e 
nearly all the trustees or parish committee are already church members 
the transfer is often quite easily and satisfactorily accomplished. It is 
necessarily a slow and patient process, if it is to be harmonious. A number 
of our leading churches hold meetings this spring to consider the abandon- 
ment of a double system and the adoption of the incorporated church idea. 
In some instances, the historic parish remains, although the transfer of 
property has or has not been made. Recently organised churches have 
started' without the parish system and have been incorporated. The 
Finnish churches of our order have made a good start. They have united 
the Finnish churches in New England under the name " The Finnish 
Mission Covenant of Congregational Churches." One church enjoys a 
unique position, having " four bodies interested in the church and prop- 
erty; church, parish, proprietors and pew owners." Many persons are in 
all the bodies. There are enough who are not to make an incorporated 
church difficult. A pastor, speaking of " archaic machinery," adds, 
" The proprietors own the church building, the ' Society ' holds the chapel, 
the church uses both; still there is harmony." The scent of orange blos- 
soms is in the air, but it is apparent that each church and parish must 
determine the wedding. 

THE LIFE CEXTER 

Fifth. 'What evangelistic methods have you employed during the year 
and with what direct results? 

A small number report evangelists or " the Gideons," for a series of 
special services, oftentimes uniting with the churches of other denomina- 
tions in the town or city. Some of the Boston pastors sincerely regret 



1906] Report on the Work of the Churches 43 

that arrangements were not made with Dr. J. Wilbur Chapman and his 
helpers; quite a number have adopted the plan of neighborhood pastors 
coming in to cooperate in evangelistic meetings. Men like Hillis, Mc- 
Elveen, Sayford, Pierce, Gale, Chafer, Taft, Byington, Hunnewell, Mac- 
Fadden, YVoodrow and others have spoken wise counsel and preached a 
winsome, forceful gospel in sections of our state, awakening an evangelistic 
atmosphere and summoning a " breath of the Spirit " for " ingathering 
week." Many emphasize the Lenten season by appropriate services. 
The reaping season is at Easter with some churches. Indications are clear 
that our preachers believe in " evangelically presenting the Gospel every 
Sunday," as the " only thing that will permanently win out anywhere." 

Some pastors are their own evangelists, using and developing evangelistic 
talent in their own parishes. With rare exceptions, all the preaching of 
our brethren rings true to the Gospel. There's a bugle call abroad of no 
uncertain sound like that of the Mission Branch of the Second Church, 
Holyoke: " We depend on each Christian doing definite, strenuous, win- 
some, thoughtful work backed by character. We always keep a long list 
of those available for church membership. We always receive new mem- 
bers at each communion ; as soon as one communion is past we press on 
for results to the next." In a few communities, unfortunately, gospel 
preaching is not altogether welcome. The record of conversions is not 
attempted, for conversions cannot be tabulated. 

The tide of a strong revival that has risen in other portions of our land 
has not been present in Massachusetts. 

BY THEIR FRUITS 

Sixth. What has been accomplished in the way of conversions and 
additions to church membership? 

There has been a steady increase, as the result of personal efforts in the 
home church. This is the normal and a satisfactory way, although reli- 
gious campaigns are desirable. Nearly all report additions. In several 
instances over fifty additions on confession of faith were made to the 
churches during 1905. This is the expectancy and the atmosphere of 
some churches more than others, like Shawmut, of Boston; Hope, of 
Springfield; Old South, of Worcester. Additions have been made often 
under adverse conditions, especially in some of the town parishes. Some 
communities pulsate with the warm blood of evangelism. Other communi- 
ties are satisfied with the respectable appearance of religion without much 
depth and heart in the progress of the church. 

A BOW OF PROMISE 

Seventh. Have you a Men's Club, and in what way has it been helpful 
to the church and community? 

The replies to this question reveal a variety of organizations and a 
marked interest. There are Men's Clubs, Leagues, Brotherhoods of 



44 Report on the Work of the Churches [1906 

Andrew and Philip, Baraca Clubs, Young People's Clubs, Good Fellow- 
ship Clubs, " First Aid Corps " for boys, with military drill, Parish Asso- 
ciations, Greek Letter Fraternities and Young Men's Clubs. Not in all 
communities do men's clubs thrive. Some write there is a " craze " for 
other brotherhoods, or, the " grange " fills the field. The organization 
may assume different forms, as in sizable Bible classes in the Sunday 
school. These clubs minister to a great variety of interests, such as adding 
one hundred dollars a year to the parish finances, visiting men by men, 
furnishing music, village improvement, caring for church property, saving 
Memorial Day from' non-observance, getting " light " on many matters of 
good citizenship, providing for a patriotic service on July 4, furnishing 
athletic games and gymnasium, encouraging literary study, providing for 
lecture courses and high-class concerts and entertainments. Some include 
the " benefit " with the fraternal idea, that of the Pilgrim Church, Dorches- 
ter, finding success in this plan and promoting it among other churches. 
Other clubs are town affairs, doing much to unify interests in the com- 
munity. In Reading, it has enlarged its membership to two hundred. 
In a classic town, " It has drawn together all classes and conditions of 
men in this complex village more than any other organization in it. It 
has stirred a new interest in the church, in the hearts of several of its 
hitherto lukewarm members; it has drawn some men to the churches; it 
has undertaken several improvements of the property; it has shown the 
workers among our men what a field they have among their brother men." 
Here is an opportunity for the Federation of Men's Clubs to crystallize 
and harmonize this stirring of masculine Christianity into its own organi- 
zation on a platform sufficiently broad to include them all. We recom- 
mend pastors to communicate with President Parris T. Farwell, of Wellesley 
Hills, or the Secretary, Eev. H. A. Barker, 9 Chestnut Square, Jamaica 
Plain, for suggestive information; also that the officers of the Federation 
consider in their platform the timely caution of our brother at Methuen 
that the club idea may not be emphasized at the expense of the church 
bond. 

UXDER THE SEARCH-LIGHT 

Eighth. What has been the serious hindrance to spiritual life and 
definite religious results in your church during the past year? 

Here is the snap-shot. " The world, the flesh and the devil which the 
church has had to contend with from the beginning"; "Lieut. 
General Apathy"; "evasion of responsibility"; "misunderstanding 
between members "; " lack of organized effort "; " satisfaction of enjoy- 
ing the means of grace with indifference to outsiders "; " hard feelings "; 
" failure of parents to encourage children "; " the everlasting hustle after 
the almighty dollar"; " church dominated by a few"; "inertia of the 
stand-bys, unreliability of the transients "; " whist clubs "; " dancing "; 
" club life "; " unchristian spirit on the part of one or two prominent in 



1906] Report on the Work of the Churches 45 

the church "; " no settled pastor "; " agitation on resignation of pastor 
and sorrow of the majority regarding the same "; " lack of consecration 
on the part of the pastor"; "financial struggles"; "unbelief"; "no 
hindrance; the best year in many decades; about fifty conversions; the 
largest number in thirty-three years " ; " minister lacks spiritual fervor " ; 
" indifference and worldliness of the people "; " the baleful influence of a 
' sect ' that for years has made light of the Bible and denied Christ " ; 
" commercial tone "; " ministers undermining the authority of the Bible, 
leaving no recognized authority"; "cares of other things 'choke' the 
Word "; " numbness of the members of the Body of Christ "; " summer 
visitors utterly ignoring church"; "strenuous effort to keep up with 
flying world "; " no real felt need of Christ "; " too much piety on the 
part of a few "; " intemperance "; " gossiping "; " the dance hall gets 
folks too tired for church work "; " the fact that some members are not 
evangelist Christians and pastor Christians " ; " epidemic of scarlet fever " ; 
" willful indifference "; " indifference of parents "; " the multiplied and 
absorbing engagements with which modern life wears people out "; " Sun- 
day visiting "; " serious belief of people that they are too busy." 

It may be suggested that all these failings are not prevalent in one 
church! A single page of a metropolitan newspaper would reveal a far 
worse condition of poor human nature. Let it not be supposed, moreover, 
for an instant that this gives a fair portrait of the church. That can never 
be produced in this world and its value never estimated. With all its 
faults frankly stated, it is a goodly fellowship of the noblest and best of 
God's children, who are the " salt of the earth " and the " light of the 
world." 

A review of the work of the churches reveals the steady, unselfish sup- 
port and devotion of the few, the faithul, ardent work of the pastors, and 
the grace and patience of the Almighty that saves us from utter calamity. 
Problems intricate and difficult confront the church, but the church with- 
out problems is dead. Indifference is suicidal; indifference looms a big 
peril. Red lanterns flare in our faces, white lights of progress gleam along 
the path of safety. Are the hands that hold the throttle palsied? Are 
Christians " asleep at the switch "? That was the crime of the telegraph 
operator in Colorado, and his negligence piled up a wTeck costing two 
hundred thousand dollars, and robbed thirty-six persons of life. Who 
can estimate the disaster that awaits a lukewarm church? Sin is ever 
rampant. Vesuvius blazes and sleeps. Nature in violent mood rocks a 
western metropolis as a child shakes a toy village, and already they talk 
of a new San Francisco. But volcanic heart-fires and passions, moral 
earthquakes, daily shock our cities, corrupt politics and business and 
desolate our homes. 

Here is the vision and the appeal to the churches of our Commonwealth. 
Like Daniel, let us rise up and do the King's business. It requires haste. 
We have not an hour to lose. Souls are weighing in the balance, our souls 



46 Report on Missionary Work [1906 

among others. Are we not still our brother's keeper? The church sum- 
mons heroes and heroines of the Faith, Christ's brave men and women, to 
share the same trials, the same hopes, the same failures, the same fellow- 
ship and the final glorious triumph of the Kingdom of our Lord. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES F. WEEDEN, Lynn. 
GEORGE A. HALL, Peabodv. 
HEXRY A. KING, Esq., Springfield. 
GEORGE W. CHASE, North Adams. 
ANDREW H. MTJLNIX, Brighton. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE OX MISSIONARY WORK 



This Committee was originally designated the " Missionary Committee," 
but later the questions gathering around evangelistic work were referred 
to it. 'We report to-day in our twofold capacity. 

MISSIONARY 

In the execution of the missionary department of our work there are 
difficulties. At times we have felt that there was no place for such a 
committee to do effective work, without duplicating the work being at- 
tempted by others, mainly by the missionary societies themselves, through 
local and district committees which they have appointed. We are of the 
opinion that such committees, under expert leadership, will accomplish 
more than a committee of the General Association, whose aim must be a 
sort of universal exhortation to " do good and communicate." The direct 
appeals of the committees of our societies are more effective than the 
omnibus appeal of such a committee as ours. The plans of the National 
Council Committee of Fifteen, which contemplated a National Committee 
on Benevolence, a State Committee, a Local Conference Committee and 
a committee in each church, while in theory good, has apparently fallen 
by the way. It was under this plan that the Missionary Committee in 
connection with our state organization originated. For two years your 
Committee has cooperated with Rev. Charles A. Northrop in his efforts 
to stimulate systematic and proportionate giving from the churches to 
each of our national benevolent societies. For lack of support Mr. North- 
rop has retired from this work and we have not heard of plans for the 
continuance of the scheme. We feel justified from experience in commend- 
ing the faithful services of Mr. Northrop, with whom we have had effective 
fellowship, in the difficult and in some ways anomalous position which he 
filled. To-day the most effective agencies for stimulating missionary 
and benevolent zeal we believe to be through the missionary societies 
themselves. 



1906] Report on Missionary Work 47 

We are of the opinion that there is a field for the operations of this 
Committee. It is not in the way of holding more missionary meetings, 
or addressing more circular letters of appeal, or gathering from our pastors, 
already loaded, more statistics, or proposing another series of questions, 
but by urging upon local conferences the organization of missionary com- 
mittees to increase interest in the local, state and national missionary 
movements. We have made efforts to learn of the missionary interests 
in the state by correspondence with the scribes of conferences. The 
replies may be summarized as follows (twenty of the twenty-five con- 
ferences of the state replied to our inquiries) : 

1. In reply to the question, " Has your conference a Missionary Com- 
mittee? " sixteen answered, " Yes." With some of the conferences this 
committee is little more than a local church-aid committee. 

2. In reply to the question, " Is the Missionary Committee doing any- 
thing? " only six were ready to answer affirmatively as regards aggressive 
work. Some reported the work of the committee as purely local in its 
scope, but nevertheless useful. 

3. In reply to the question, " What is the state of missionary interest 
in your conference? " eight reported the interest as good; three reported 
the interest as increasing, with room for improvement; five reported the 
interest as only fair; four do not venture an opinion; while one frank scribe 
declares that " a spiritual cyclone " is needed to arouse the churches to a 
proper sense of their obligations. 

A study of these replies would seem to justify the existence of this state 
committee and to justify also their urging upon the conferences the follow- 
ing considerations: 

First. The wisdom of each conference having a well-organized Com- 
mittee on Missionary Benevolence with definite plans of campaign in the 
interest of higher standards of missionary giving in our churches. 

Second. The need of each local church so organizing its missionary' work 
as to bring the churches into vital touch with the Foreward Movement in 
Missions which is so pregnant with hope for the future. 

Third. The advisability of bringing these local committees into close 
relationship with such committees as are appointed by the missionary 
societies with the aim to secure increased gifts to each of our benevolent 
societies. 

Along these lines we feel that the state committee has its mission. It 
can foster and invite missionary organization as indicated. 



EVANGELISTIC WOKE 

The Missionary Committee was " instructed to cooperate with the 
churches in all possible helpful ways in promoting evangelistic work"; 
" to carry on the work during the present year in consultation with the 
Board of Pastoral Supply "; " to report at the next annual meeting of 



48 Report on Missionary Work [1906 

the Association whether this work can best be done by a separate com- 
mittee or by the Board of Pastoral Supply." 

First. We have made efforts to be of help to the churches under a 
plan which has been called " The Pastor Evangelist with the Pastor." 
The plan has commended itself to the pastors and laymen in our own state, 
has been extended in its general features into other states, and has had the 
warm approval of the National Committee on Evangelism. The plan was 
developed as follows : 

(1) Your Committee entered upon extended correspondence to secure 
the names of as many pastors as possible, well scattered through the state, 
who would be willing to give five or ten days in evangelistic work with 
some other pastor and his church. It is an occasion for gratification that 
so many busy men were ready to render such service if called upon. 

(2) A letter was sent to each of the churches in our state outlining the 
plans of the Committee and giving the names of pastors who might be 
called upon for evangelistic services, the arrangements for the same to 
be made through this Committee. The pastors and churches were asked 
to select the man or men they would invite to their assistance, and the 
engagement was sought through this Committee. 

(3) Letters of two kinds were drafted and sent out as occasion required, 
one giving the churches our views as to the preparation for such meetings 
and what the visiting pastor had a right to expect; the other making sug- 
gestions as to the methods and spirit to be used by the visiting pastor. 
By these letters we contemplated various questions, such as traveling 
expenses, entertainment, preparation and kindred matters. 

We have not attempted to tabulate results as regards figures, but we 
can say by way of report that something over thirty engagements were 
consummated by the Committee, as many more efforts made to secure 
connections with busy pastors, which failed, and probably as many more 
engagements made apart from the Committee directly by pastor or 
church, and more than an ordinary number of series of meetings with a 
different man at each of the meetings. We are confident that the plans 
thus inaugurated by the Committee have fulfilled in a measure the charge 
given it by the Association "to help the churches," have suggested much 
evangelistic work apart from the Committee, and have proven of no little 
service in reminding the pastors that they can " do the work of an evangel- 
ist," not only in their own churches, but in their fellowship with other 
churches. It will be worth while, in our opinion, to continue the general 
plan of evangelistic work with such improvements as experience will 
suggest. 

Second. We have been in consultation, as requested, with the Board 
of Pastoral Supply through its Secretary and Executive Committee. 
Through its office our circular letters have been sent to the pastors and 
churches, and all the correspondence relative to engagements, under the 
supervision of the Evangelistic Committee. We acknowledge the efficiency 



1906] Report on Labor Organizations 49 

of the work clone and are of the opinion that this cooperation in the 
future will be both wise and economical. 

Third. In reply to the third part of our mission as given us last year, 
we are of the opinion that this work can best be done by a separate com- 
mittee, rather than by the Board of Pastoral Supply. This judgment is 
confirmed by the Board itself. At the same time, we feel that there should 
be the same consultation and cooperation with the Board of Pastoral 
Supply which has been so satisfactory during the year, especially in the 
use of the machinery of the office for our correspondence. 

Your Committee would make these recommendations: 

1. That the Missionary Committee, to consist of five members, be con- 
tinued; its purpose being to foster and encourage organization for mission- 
ary purposes in all our local conferences. 

2. That the Evangelistic Committee, to consist of five members, be 
continued, whose object shall be to assist the churches in promoting 
evangelistic work, and that this committee consult with the Board of 
Pastoral Supply, as last year. 

The question of combining these two committees in one, as was the case 
last year, we respectfully refer without recommendation to the Business 
Committee. 



CHAS. H. DANIELS, Chairman. 
FRANK S. HUNNEWELL. 
WILLIAM T. McELVEEN. 
FRANCIS J. VAN HORNE. 
EDWIN H. BYINGTON, Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON LABOR 
ORGANIZATIONS 

At the annual meeting of the state Association in May, 1905, this 
Committee was instructed " to use its influence to promote legislation 
prohibiting the employment of children under sixteen years of age between 
seven o'clock in the evening and six o'clock in the morning." 

In obedience to these instructions your Committee sought the coopera- 
tion of other organizations interested in the protection of children. Mem- 
bers of the Committee attended various conferences with representatives 
from Labor Unions, the Children's Aid Society, the Consumers' League, 
the National Child Labor Society and other similar organizations. It was 
soon discovered that officers of organizations representing the textile 
industries intended to introduce a bill to the legislature prohibiting the 
night labor of both women and minors in the factories. Separate legisla- 
tion, relating to children only, was thought to be prejudicial to the interest 



50 Report en Labor Organizations [1906 

of this larger bill and it was, therefore, decided that it would be unwise 
to seek any such separate legislation. The fate of the overtime bill is 
now a notorious matter of history. It was defeated in the Senate after a 
long struggle, and by a majority of one vote. 

Your Committee endeavored to learn how large a number of children 
would be affected by the proposed legislation, but it was unable to obtain 
any statistics, either from the labor bureau or from other sources. The 
probability is that outside of the textile industries there are large numbers 
of children under sixteen years of age who are employed as messenger 
boys, newsboys, cash girls, in candy stores and other occupations, some- 
times until midnight. The defeat of the overtime bill was due to its bear- 
ing on the work of women at night. The effort to prohibit child labor 
alone would probably have been successful. 

Considerable advance has been made, however, during the year. The 
recommendations of Governor Guild for the state and of President Roose- 
velt for national legislation are notable. Governor Guild, in his message, 
declared that the force of inspectors for Massachusetts is inadequate and 
advised enlarging the number. He also urged that truant officers be 
required to visit factories, workshops and mercantile establishments and 
report at once to the district attorney any case of breach of the law which 
they may discover. A bill to carry this recommendation into effect was 
introduced in the legislature and members of your Committee were present 
at the hearing and spoke in its behalf. 

The Governor also says in his message: " Agents of the State Bureau of 
Labor Statistics report to me that a shameful trade exists, which supplies 
for money false age and schooling certificates to children under age. This 
report is confirmed by the district police. Employers notable in their 
desire not only to obey but to promote the law have been deceived and 
victimized by this practice. The present penalty for the forcing of a 
child of tender years into a factory by the perjury of unnatural parents or 
others is a trivial fine. I shall leave it to your sense of justice whether a 
light fine without imprisonment is punishment severe enough for law- 
breakers, who to-day in Massachusetts traffic not only in the toil but in 
the health and lives of little children." 

For the attention which Governor Guild has thus given to remedying the 
defective conditions which exist in our own Commonwealth all friends of 
children and of humanity may well be grateful. 

But the problem is national, also, and we in Massachusetts suffer because 
of inhumanity which prevails elsewhere. In part we are responsible for 
such inhumanity, not only because Massachusetts men and money are 
sometimes involved, but also because we must have a share in remedying 
national evils. One of the first necessities is to turn on the light, that 
all men may see what the conditions are and where they exist. 

President Roosevelt has taken the first step toward turning on the light. 
In his last annual message to Congress he said: " I renew the reeommenda- 



FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 
36 NORTH WEST TEMPLE 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84150 



190G] Report on Labor Organizations 51 

tion I made in my last annual message for an investigation by the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Labor of general labor conditions, special atten- 
tion to be paid to the conditions of child labor and child labor legislation in 
the several states. Such an investigation should take into account the 
various problems with which the question of child labor is connected. . . . 
It would be well for the nation to endeavor to secure and publish compre- 
hensive information as to the conditions of the labor of children in the 
different states, so as to spur up those that are behindhand, and to secure 
approximately uniform legislation of a high character among the several 
states." 

In accordance with this recommendation a bill is now before Congress, 
(Senate 2962) " to establish in the Department of the Interior a bureau 
to be known as the ' Children's Bureau.' " Its duty is described as follows: 
"The said bureau shall investigate and report upon all matters pertaining to 
the welfare of children and child life, and shall especially investigate the 
questions of infant mortality, the birth rate, physical degeneration, orphanage, 
juvenile delinquency and juvenile courts, desertion and illegitimacy, dan- 
gerous occupation, accidents and diseases of children of the working classes, 
employment, legislation affecting children in the several states and territories 
and such other facts as have a bearing upon the health, efficiency, character 
and training of children. The chief of said bureau shall, from time to 
time, publish the results of these investigations." 

Your Committee earnestly recommend that the friends of such national 
legislation write to their Representatives and Senators in Congress urging 
the passage of the bill. 

In its broadet relation to labor organizations, your Committee early 
found new work on its hands. In June, 1905, a letter was sent to a large 
number of our ministers in Boston and vicinity from a committee of the 
Boston Typographical Union. It read as follows: 

" Boston Typographical Union No. 13 has created a Missionary Com- 
mittee, charged with the duty of bringing about a better understanding 
between the Union and other organizations, particularly the churches. 
A large proportion of the best men in this Union, sober, industrious, capa- 
ble and reliable, feel that the church does not meet their needs; that it has 
nothing for them; that it is not interested in them; and to some extent 
that it does not want workingmen in its membership. For the adequate 
performance of its mission the Union frequently needs the counsel and 
sympathy of the church. To secure this in greater measure, not only for 
this Union but for all unions and for all workingmen, is the duty of this 
Committee. Any suggestions you may offer will be gladly received." 

You will recognize that this friendly advance made by the officials of 
a large labor union is an important and significant event. We are informed 
that practically all of the answers to this letter were cordial and made a 
most fortunate impression upon the committee by whom it was issued. 

In order to further the purpose of the lette_r,a meeting of ministers was 

M/ ' 1340 
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21851 :,:.V:VV.' ./,; 



52 Report on Labor Organizations [1906 

called, under the auspices of this Labor Committee, to consider what action 
could be taken. About forty representative men were present. As the 
result of discussion this Committee, together with the Massachusetts 
representatives of the Labor Committee of the National Council, was 
instructed to respond to the letter from the Typographical L T nion, in the 
name of the Conference, expressing hearty sympathy and desire for co- 
operation; to suggest the appointment of speakers to represent the 
churches and the unions in each other's gatherings, to the end that a better 
mutual acquaintance and understanding might be promoted. And, also, 
as it was made known that a printers' strike was impending, this joint 
committee was authorized to tender its services to the Typothete and the 
Typographical Union, to see if, by any means, the strike and its conse- 
quent deplorable results might be averted. Effort in this latter direction 
was earnestly made, but without effect, as both local organizations, 
employer and employed, were acting under directions from their national 
organizations. 

In furtherance of the general desire to promote a better acquaintance, 
this Committee has also met in conference with the Missionary Committee 
of the Typographical Union and discussed the general situation, certainly 
with profit to the members of your Committee. We also arranged that 
the Boston Ministers' meeting should be addressed by Mr. Henry Sterling, 
Secretary of the Typographical L'nion, and Mr. John F. Tobin, President 
of the Boot and Shoe Workers' Union, on the " Necessity and the Ethics 
of Trades Unions." There was a large attendance at the meeting and the 
feeling was strengthened that it is of great importance for the members of 
the churches and of the labor unions to meet in such conferences for the 
promotion of a better acquaintance and mutual understanding. 

It is a significant fact that the labor unions of the state contain about 
as many members (about one hundred thousand) as the Congregational 
churches. In these unions are many of the so-called " better class " of 
working people, skilled laborers, many of whom feel that the church is not 
interested in them and their ambitions, and that the church as a whole 
does not want them in its membership! These are sober, industrious, 
capable, reliable people. They are the men and women who spend their 
leisure with their families, who keep their children off the street and in 
the house at night. They are intensely interested in the union. Its ideals 
are to them as high and inspiring as the ideals of the church are to the 
Christian, though not as broad nor as wide-reaching. In many respects the 
ideals of the two bodies are the same; the moral, mental and spiritual up- 
lifting of men, and the bettering of their physical and temporal conditions. 
Any effort to reach these men and women that would be successful must 
take these facts into account. The members of the unions respond to 
any evidence of appreciation and sympathy with their best desires. They 
have trials and perplexities, hopes, aspirations, justifiable and honorable 
ambitions. They need, as we do, the help and guidance of the gospel. 



1906] v Report on Temperance 53 

It is our duty to study their point of view, concerning which most of us 
are profoundly ignorant. Only by understanding them and acknowledg- 
ing the right of whatever is right in their ideals and aspirations can we hope 
to work in sympathy with them and they with us for humanity and the 
Kingdom of God. Many of them are as ignorant of the real aims and 
nature of the churches as we are of the aims and nature of the unions. 
Let individual members of the churches, both ministers and laymen, then, 
cultivate the acquaintance of members of labor unions in their own neigh- 
borhood, endeavor to gain their point of view and understand their ideas. 
By such widespread individual acquaintance and understanding the mutual 
existing ignorance and prejudice may be overcome, the present tragic 
inconsistency be corrected and the people who work find their natural 
place under the leadership of the Son of the Carpenter and in the brother- 
hood of his followers. 

Therefore, this Committee offers the following resolutions: 
Resolved, That we urgently recommend that the members of our churches 
seek acquaintance with members of labor organizations, that they study 
the history and aims of labor unions, and endeavor to understand clearly 
their object and purpose, to the end that through mutual friendliness the 
influence of the gospel of the Kingdom of God may be increased both among 
the unions and in the churches, and also that they and we, with a better 
realization of the character and purpose of the Church of Christ, may 
be led to seek from it the counsel, the guidance and the assistance which 
is our common need and our common privilege. 

Also, Resolved, That we recommend to the members of our churches 
who are in favor of diminishing as far as possible the existing evils of child 
labor that they communicate with their national Representatives in legis- 
lature urging the passage of pending bills in favor of the creation of the 
Children's Bureau for the national investigation of conditions of child 
labor. 

PARRI3 T. FARWELL. 

BAYARD E. HARRISON, Secretary. 

CLARK CARTER. 

GEORGE E. KEITH. 

CLARENCE F. SWIFT. 



REPORT OF, COMMITTEE OX TEMPERANCE 



Previous committees have reported in regard to various phases of the 
cause of temperance, and for this reason we have deemed it wise, at this 
time, to report concerning only one aspect of this subject, namely, the 
legislative. We assume that the report of last year has been heeded 
and that the churches of our Association are training the young and 



54 Report on Gambling [1906 

favoring such agencies as promote temperate living. We recognize that 
we have a considerable body of legislation in regard to the liquor traffic, 
but- In tow of the numerous and repeated attempts to break down that 
legislation by the liquor interests, we therefore recommend the passage 
of the following resolutions: 

I. That this body of Congregational churches memorialize the General 
Court to extend the suffrage so that women shall be allowed to vote in 
public elections on the question of granting licenses for the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors. 

II. That we also request the General Court to grant ward and district 
option in cities and towns which vote to grant licenses for the sale of 
intoxicating liquor. This measure woidd prevent the granting of licenses 
to any saloons in any ward or district of a city or town in which the 
majority of the votes cast is found to be against the granting of licenses. 

III. That this body is opposed to any changes in existing laws which 
shall extend the hours during which liquor may be legally sold in hotels 
or saloons. 

IV. That this Association hereby authorizes its Committee on Temper- 
ance to appear before any committee or committees of the General Court 
and advocate the measures recommended in this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM M. MACNAIR. 
WILLIAM O. CONRAD. 
JULIUS GARST. 
LUKE S. STOWE. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON GAMBLING 



The Committee on Gambling had no occasion for legislative work this 
year, since no attempt was made to weaken the laws against the play for 
stakes, the lottery and pool selling at races. L T nder our present laws, 
faithfully administered, it has been found possible to prevent pool selling 
and book making at races. 

Your Committee does not suppose it needs to argue, or even to empha- 
size here, the magnitude of this evil. Years ago Lord Beaconsfield charac- 
terized the English turf as " a vast engine of national demoralization." 
This is, perhaps, no less true of the turf in our own land. Race-track 
gambling was outlawed in Massachusetts in- a statute passed in 1885. 
Several attempts have been made, but as yet without success, to break 
down that interdict. Under some recent executives of the Commonwealth, 
the law has been given increased effectiveness. But it requires unceasing 
determination on the part o'f both authorities and people to keep this 
interdict in effective operation. 



1906] Report on Gambling 55 

Against the moral interests involved in the maintenance of the law are 
the financial temptations to race-track gambling. For example, eight 
New York state racing associations, combined in a trust, reported to the 
state controller gross receipts of $4,014,340 in 1903, and of S3,805,125 in 
1904. It is believed that from five to six eighths of this sum was profits 
to the management. Of course, there is a heavy financial stake, and those 
whose business is jeopardized will fight hard before submitting to be dis- 
possessed of their opportunity. 

In the hope to gain by indirection what they could not hope to get 
directly, a company of great racing men, by some means, obtained a charter 
for a race track at Salem, N. H., just over the state line in the Merrimac 
valley. This is within convenient distance of Greater Boston and the 
most populous part of Massachusetts. A great racing outfit has been 
prepared and the Boston & Maine Railroad has laid track to accommodate 
the expected patronage of the races to be run the coming season with as 
much of the gambling feature as can be smuggled in. Too late for the best 
results, the moral forces of New Hampshire awoke to a sense of the iniquity 
which had been established under legislative action. Since the situation 
came to be realized the best citizenship of that state has been seeking to 
checkmate the nefarious attempt to fix the race-track gambling octopus 
upon central New England. This is legally the fight of our New Hamp- 
shire brethren. But morally it is our fight, likewise, because it is fully 
as inimical to the moral and financial interests of Massachusetts as of 
New Hampshire. For this reason your Committee invoke an expression 
of this Association upon this matter. That such action on our part would 
be welcomed we are assured by members of the committee in charge of the 
New Hampshire fight. President Tucker, of Dartmouth College, for 
example, says: " In any event, we shall be most glad of your aid in the 
General Association of Massachusetts. Any protest that you can make 
will give us moral help. The Salem race track, if allowed in full operation, 
will inflict a mighty hurt upon eastern Massachusetts as well as upon 
New Hampshire." We note with equal sympathy the fight against this 
gigantic evil now in progress in New York, Missouri and elsewhere, and 
we bid Godspeed to every such effort to suppress it. 

It must not be forgotten, however, that this evil of gambling has wide 
ramifications and various forms of expression. It is found not only among 
professional gamblers and disreputable people; it has also invaded our 
social circles" and even, church circles, at least in some branches of the 
Christian church, where the raffle is a stated means of raising funds for 
church purposes. Not content with this, certain churches, not closely 
affiliated with our order, have introduced into their fairs a method of play 
for stakes in which a money fee is staked on the turn of a wheel for a cash 
prize, and this even on the Lord's day, and within church buildings, all 
features of the fair running at full blast with the wheels a star attraction, 
as the patronage has indicated. 



56 Report on Gambling [1906 

One of the grave evils of the time is the rage for bridge whist among 
society women. One of them says of her own experience: " Every spare 
hour is filled with bridge, it seems to me. One cannot get away from it. 
There is scarcely a mail which does not bring to me an invitation to play 
at the house of some one of my friends — of a morning, or following a 
luncheon, or from three to five or six o'clock, or after a dinner. Some 
day bridge may pall on society. Just now we live and breathe bridge." 
And the testimony is that the play is almost always for stakes, sometimes 
high, and at the very least for a prize. " I do not play for money," one 
woman remarks, " and I find I am cut off from playing with the women 
I know best." Not to speak of the domestic and social waste in such 
excessive devotion to pleasure, this particular form of amusement as 
frequently, if not customarily, played, encourages and stimulates the vice 
of gambling, a -vice which the prime minister of New Zealand has recently 
said to be the greatest evil of the colony, " sapping the life of the people." 
This social custom not only sanctions gambling, it is gambling, as we 
have once and again been told from the bench. " The special and insidious 
danger of bridge," says the Springfield Republican, " lies in its tendency, 
under the sanction of social custom, to force gambling upon those who 
would otherwise never be tempted to play for money." The play for 
stakes in a gambling den, for the purpose of fleecing the unwary, cannot 
be condemned on any principle that does not also condemn the social game 
for stakes, where the unskillful are doomed to lose, and often to lose so 
much that young men are compelled to cut themselves off from response to 
social opportunity because they cannot stand the pecuniary drain. This 
in itself is a grave evil in more than one aspect of the case. The argument 
for pool selling in the races is very often the same as that advanced for 
stakes in a game of bridge; viz., that it adds zest to the sport. The argu- 
ment is as warrantable in the one case as in the other, but it justifies the 
stake in neither case. There can be little hope of making headway against 
this tremendous evil so long as it is allowed to thrive in high social life. 
Such social sanction of the custom tends seriously to paralyze official oppo- 
sition to the unlawful play for stakes, wherever manifested. 

In view of the facts thus briefly set forth, and of the urgency of the case, 
your Committee recommends: 

First. That the Committee on Gambling be continued, with the enlarge- 
ment of its membership to five. 

Second. That the Association declare anew its utter condemnation 
of playing for stakes, in every- form, not excluding the raffle at church 
fairs. 

Third. That the Association express its deepest sympathy with our 
New Hampshire brethren in their fight against the Salem race track. 
Recognizing in the location of this track, on the borders of a populous 
section of our state, an attempt to invade our territory for patronage, 
without exposing the proprietors to the jurisdiction of our authorities, 



1906] Report of Executive Committee 57 

we regard the fight against this track as, in part, our own morally, and 
tender to our brethren across the border such aid as we can render. 

Fourth. That we instruct our Committee on Gambling to join with 
similar committees of other bodies in watching race tracks within our own 
state, and to notify local authorities, having jurisdiction, of our determi- 
nation to appeal to the governor of the Commonwealth, unless they 
themselves enforce the laws against pool selling and book making on race 
tracks. 

PAYSON W. LYMAN, 
WILLIAM SHAW, 

FRANK E. BUTLER, 

Committee on Gambling. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Your Committee have met at various times during the year and here- 
with report business transacted as follows: A sub-committee consisting 
of Revs. Charles F. Carter, A. J. Dyer and Francis J. Marsh were chosen 
a Finance Committee. The bond of the Treasurer of the Association was 
fixed at three thousand dollars, and such bond secured. Sufficient copies 
of the papers of Rev. C. M. Clark and Rev. J. G. Taylor were printed and 
sent to the various conferences of the state. 

The Secretary was ordered to destroy all copies of " Minutes " of pre- 
vious years over and above twelve copies of each year and " to take such 
inexpensive measures as he thinks best to secure a complete set of " Min- 
utes," and also to continue the same plan of distribution of the " Minutes " 
of this year as adopted the past year. 

The resignations of Rev. L. W. Bacon, of Assonet, and also of Rev. A. B. 
Bassett, of Ware, from the Committee on the Work of the Churches were 
accepted and Rev. Charles F. Weeden, of Lynn, and Rev. George A. Hall, 
of Feabody, were chosen to fill the vacancies thus made. 

Mr. Frederick Fosdick, of Fitchburg, having resigned from the Executive 
Committee, Mr. George P. Morris, of Boston, was chosen to this vacancy. 

Your Committee voted to appropriate for the Committee on Missionary 
Work a sum not to exceed thirty-five dollars; for the Committee on Labor 
Organizations a sum not exceeding five dollars; and for the Committee on 
the Readjustment of our Polity a sum not exceeding fifteen dollars. 

Your Committee also requested the Committee on the Work of the 
Churches in their report to speak briefly of the development of Men's 
Clubs and their work among men in our churches; and the Provisional 
Committee to arrange, if possible, some time during this session of the 
Association for the consideration of the proposed union of the United 
Brethren, Methodist Protestant and Congregational churches. 



58 Report of Committee on Federation of Churches [190G 

We recommend that the Association determine how many members 
shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee. It is often diffi- 
cult to secure the attendance of a majority of the Committee. 

EDWARD W. NOYES, Chairman. 
FRANCIS J. MARSH, Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 



The Publication Committee reports that it met at Worcester, March 14, 
1906, and awarded the printing for the Association to the Fort Hill Press, 
Boston. We continue the arrangement of using the plates of the Year- 
Book for the statistical reports of our churches. By this arrangement 
the General Association secures a rebate of one dollar and seventy-five 
cents per page, and the Year-Book a like rebate. 
Respectfully submitted, 

COLLINS G. BURNHAM. 
FRANCIS J. MARSH. 
JOHN L. KILBON. 
FRANK S. BLANCH ARD. 
E. W. LAMSON. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FEDERATION OF 
CHURCHES 



The subject of Church Federation has occupied the attention of men of 
different denominations in the state since December 1, 1901, when the 
Rev. E. Tallmadge Root was invited to confer with brethren of several 
denominations called together for the purpose of conference upon the 
possibilities of practical work along federated lines. Before that, Dr. 
Sanford, of New York, had visited the state and had private conversation 
with several clergymen known to be interested in the subject. 

It was anticipated that Massachusetts would be prepared to cooperate 
with such states as had already begun to recognize that the day had 
dawned for a more intelligent and catholic interpretation of practical 
Christianity. But I think that, without -libelling her, I may say that 
Massachusetts was already so preempted by other interests that she had 



1906] Report of Committee on Federation of Churches 59 

no ear for any new voice, however urgent and eloquent it might be. Her 
response to this new appeal was disappointing. The Congregationalists 
who had a right to leadership in this state, if anywhere, were laggard in 
the extreme. Their plea that they were so overburdened already that no- 
new interest had any chance to be heard was made with a sincerity that 
was more genuine than intelligence was acute. 

However, a state council was organized, as completely representative 
as could be of several ecclesiastical denominations. Meetings of this 
Council have been occasionally held. Work has been done of a preliminary 
kind, principally in the way of investigation, necessarily a slow process. 
But the state needs educating. Except the secretaries of home mission- 
ary associations, no one has knowledge sufficient to be a basis of intelligent 
action. That everywhere there is waste of men and waste of money in 
maintaining in scanty populations churches representative of different 
types of ecclesiastical polity, is not a discovery. This much has been 
known and deplored for a long time past. The question, What can be 
done? has been upon the lips of scores of earnest men who felt that a 
blind and intense denominationalism was hindering the work of Christ in 
two directions, — it was training up a generation of small-minded Christians 
in the churches, incapable of taking a broad and unselfish view of the 
situation, and it was giving just occasion to the enemies of the Lord out- 
side the churches to hold aloof from men calling themselves Christians, 
who illustrated, by their jealousy of each other and their zeal for the pecca- 
dillos of ecclesiastical life above the great things of the soul, that " all 
seek their own, not the things which are Jesus Christ's." Types of Chris- 
tians are being produced altogether other than those we find in the New 
Testament. 

Meanwhile, the state is becoming more and more a home missionary 
field, and, in the presence of this fact, the churches are becoming less and 
less capable of sustaining home missionary work. Into many country 
towns the foreign population is pouring, and the American people proper, 
on whom our churches depend for home missionary support, are becoming, 
relatively to the mass, fewer and fewer. There is nothing hopeful in the 
future unless home missionary societies can federate. Dr. Eaton, of the 
Baptist denomination, has written, " We shall soon be prepared for the 
radical step of refusing aid to any church not indorsed by the Federation." 
If that step could be taken a great and fruitful advance would be made in 
the right direction. 

We need a federal council su.ficiently large and representative to 
formulate a judgment which, on action that is divisive, and merely secta- 
rian, shall be final, because there can be very little doubt that most 
Massachusetts towns and villages are over-churched. Every denomina- 
tion undertakes to represent the whole of Christianity, with the result 
that all the churches are in a state of schism, and the prayer we offer, 
oftentimes with a despairing earnestness, for an outpouring of the energies 



60 Report of Committee on Federation of Churches [190G 

and influences of the. Holy Spirit, remains unanswered and unanswer- 
able. 

lor what do we pray? That we may perpetuate the present order of 
things? Our Lord's prayer for his disciples was " That they all may be 
one even as Thou, Father, art in me, and I in Thee, that they also may be 
one in us: that the world man believe that Thou hast sent me." We may be 
sure of one thing — that the Holy Spirit of God will never be given for 
purposes out of harmony with the prayer of the Master. The most 
subtle and vigorous, efforts have been made to interpret that passage in 
a way which would leave us free to do as we like in what we call ecclesiasti- 
cal matters. I cannot conceive of any honest man hoping to be guided 
from above, who is wiling to put into the words a meaning which, on any 
fair exegesis, they cannot convey. 

There is another aspect of this theme which we must not allow to escape 
us. If we are successfully to resist the forces in this state which are 
arrayed against evangelical religion, the domination of that imperialistic 
eeelesiasticiam which we know as the. Church of Rome, the most astute 
political influence in the country, ubiquitous, untiring, unconquerable, — 
and the secularism which molds the life and conduct of all unchurched 
people, — the cooperative union of all evangelical denominations is abso- 
lutely essential. Never can we make our voice heard effectively as we 
are. The case is hopeless. Our legislators" La the State House do not 
listen to us. These straggling faithful few who go there to resist measures 
for degrading the people produce next to no impression. YVe ought to 
be there in such numbers as to be a representative power, dangerous to 
resist. Romanism rules Boston, the old Puritan city. It inspires and 
controls some of the most widely circulated organs in the cheap press. 
It even makes it all but impossible for Protestant men to get work on the 
streets or elsewhere. These are facts known and read of all men, and the 
people who arrogate to themselves the word " respectable " are as apa- 
thetic as if they were incapable of humiliation. The only powerless bodies 
are the evangelical denominations, and they are powerless because almost 
hopelessly divided in all practical cooperative movement. 

I know that to mend matters requires an enormous amount of self- 
sacrifice, patient plodding, perseverance, the creation of a new and diviner 
atmosphere in which our souls can breathe the breath of a new life. But 
a new reformation is necessary. The trouble is that every denomination 
is afraid of losing something. There are some things we might lose and 
be none the poorer. A man one day gave it as his reason for being a 
Congregationalist, that he could not step into any other denomination 
without having to become less open-minded and more bigoted. The man 
was right. But leadership in this state is our historical prerogative, and 
if we are not to vacate our rightful place, we must awake to the imperious 
necessity that is upon us and learn how to lead that cooperative -move- 
ment to which I believe God is now calling this land. " But if thou hold 



A 



1906] On Re-adjustment of Our Polity 61 

thy peace at this time, then will relief and deliverance arise from another 
place, but thou and thy father's house will perish — and who knoweth 
whether thou art not come to the Kingdom for such a time as this?" 
For the Committee: 

L. CLARK SEELYE, Chairman. 

W. V. W. DAVIS. 

REUEX THOMAS. 

W. L. McELVEEN. 

F. E. EMRICH. 

C. H. OLIPHANT. 

J. P. BATES. 

F. G. COOK. 

G. E. COPELAND. - 
H. S. CONANT. 

S. A. HOLTON. 
C. A. BRODEUR. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RE-ADJUSTMENT OF 
OUR POLITY 

REV. CALVIN M. CLARK, HAVERHILL 



Our report is one of progress, not of finality. Early in September, 
1905, prior to the fall sessions of the conferences, the Committee, in keeping 
with their instructions from the State Association, at Lowell, sent a circular 
letter to the scribes of all the conferences, notifying them of the vote of 
the State Association upon the matter of the " Conciliar Committee," 
and requesting them to bring the subject to the attention of their respective 
conferences. At the same time, the Committee on Polity had sent to each 
scribe a copy of the Advance for May 25, 1905, giving some account of 
the new system just introduced into Michigan. The results of the action 
of the fall sessions of the conferences were as follows: 

Number of conferences in the state 25 

Not heard from 1 

Took no action, chiefly through oversight 3 

Rejected the suggested Conciliar Committee 1 

Referred the matter either directly to the churches, or to a 

committee of the conference to report at their spring session, 20 

That is, as was anticipated, the action of the conferences at their fall 
sessions was preliminary to more full and decisive action this spring. 

A revised edition of a paper read by the chairman of the Committee on 
Politv before the fall session of the Andover Conference was ordered 



62 On Re-adjustment 0} Our Polity [1906 

printed by the Committee, and copies of this paper were distributed to 
the committees of the conferences having the matter in charge, or to the 
churches where the matter had been referred directly to the churches. 
This paper explained in detail the suggested " Conciliar Committee," 
gave a brief but accurate outline of the new system in Michigan, proposed 
also for Wisconsin, and some other information. 

Most of the conferences have given large room at their spring sessions 
for reports of their committees, and for discussions on matters of polity 
in general and the " Conciliar Committee " in particular. The chief ends 
in the Committee's making this suggestion at all, viz., to awaken interest 
in our own polity, to inform regarding movements elsewhere among our 
churches, and above all to test the question whether the churches here 
in Massachusetts were practically ready to make changes which seemed 
imminent if the movement for union with two other denominations was 
carried through, were attained. Since the meeting at Lowell, where the 
suggestion was made, the situation has been vastly changed by the Dayton 
Conference in February, and the unexpected action of that body in voting 
for organic union. Since then questions of polity have become immensely 
more prominent and urgent. 

The results of the action of the spring sessions of the conferences are 
given, as nearly as possible, Ln the language of the votes taken. They are 
grouped for readiness of reference. The position of one or two conferences, 
as assigned by our Committee, may be open to doubt, by reason of ambigu- 
ity in language, either in the vote or in the letter of the scribe reporting 
the vote. 

The total number of conferences in the state is twenty-five. 

1. From one conference only, the Berkshire South, the Committee has 
had no report except of inaction last fall. 

2. One conference, the Old Colony, took no notice of the suggestion 
sent down by the State Association, but expressed itself " as in hearty 
sympathy with the end proposed by the Dayton Council, and as willing 
to cooperate in the movement." 

3. Three conferences, the Berkshire North, the Essex North, and the 
Taunton, hold their meetings later than the sessions of the State Asso- 
ciation. The Berkshire North took no action last fall. The Essex Xorth 
and the Taunton appointed committees last fall to report this spring. 

4. Three conferences, the Brookfield, Hampshire East, and Mendon, 
postponed action; the Brookfield, "indefinitely"; Hampshire East, 
"for further consideration"; Mendon, awaiting "the general readjust- 
ment which will, of necessity, have to be." 

5. Six, the Andover, Essex South, Hampden, Hampshire, Pilgrim, and 
Worcester North, reject the proposed " Conciliar Committee "; Andover, 
on report of its committee, without discussion; Essex South, " assembled 
in the meetinghouse of the church of which the Rev. John Wise was 
formerly pastor, not favoring the ' Committee ' as proposed "; Hampden, 



1906] On Re-adjustment of Our Polity 63 

" believing that the establishment of conciliar committees is not wise," 
but " deeming it wise to defer all attempts to reorganize one denomi- 
national system until the question of the union of the three denominations 
has been decided "; Hampshire, by unanimous action at their fall session ; 
Pilgrim, with fifteen churches, by a popular vote of ten yeas to fourteen 
nays; Worcester North, with the words: " We are unalterably opposed 
to organic union with any body of men outside the individual church." 

6. The three Suffolk conferences stand in a group by themselves. The 
Suffolk North " is in hearty accord with the movement for a more efficient 
organization of our denominational forces, but we are not clear that . . . 
the creation of a conciliar committee and giving to it judicial powers 
would best serve this end." From the Suffolk South no definite action 
upon the proposed "Conciliar Committee" is reported; their scribe 
reports that the conference seriously desire some movement in the general 
direction pointed out last year. The Suffolk West criticises the " Conciliar 
Committee " as proposed because the lay members should be elected by 
the churches, not merely nominated, because there is still need of the 
vicinage council in the old form, because the proposal of last year does 
not provide for the determination of ministerial standing and the super- 
vision of the churches, and because the committee as proposed is too 
large and cumbersome. 

All three of the Suffolk conferences have taken action establishing, 
or looking towards the establishing, of a Conference Committee, of five 
or seven members, both clergymen and laymen, of about the nature of 
the Advisory Committees of the Michigan plan, with large powers of 
initiative and oversight. 

7. Four conferences, Barnstable, Franklin, Middlesex South, and Nor- 
folk, may be grouped together as approving the suggested Committee in 
general, but objecting to details. Barnstable, " without committing itself 
to all details as published, heartily approves of the general principle, and 
holds itself ready to adopt the plan as soon as it shall receive general 
approval throughout the state." Franklin " favors some forward move- 
ment of the kind suggested by the General Association, but objects to 
the size of the ' Conciliar Committee,' and to the finality of its action." 
Middlesex South " is in hearty sympathy with the movement looking 
towards union with other bodies, is divided as to the specific matter of 
the ' Conciliar Committee,' the rock upon which the "conference split 
being the finality of the Committee's finding," and referred the matter 
to the churches. Norfolk " is in hearty accord with the purpose and 
spirit of the proposition, hopes the State Association will formulate some 
plan along this line and send it down to the churches for consideration, 
and voted that its own Executive Committee should secure from each 
church in the conference its judgment on the matter and present the 
result at the next meeting." 

8. Four conferences, Middlesex Union, Woburn, Worcester Central, 



64 On Re-adjustment of Our Polity [1906 

and Worcester South, come nearest to approving the suggested Committee. 
Middlesex Union, with twenty-four churches, on a vote by churches, five 
not voting, voted six nays and thirteen yeas. Woburn accepted a sub- 
stitute which changed the name to " Permanent Council "; put the election 
of the lay delegate in the hands of the local church, changed the matter 
of extra-conferential members of the Council so that the church might 
invite whom it pleased, but the number of these members was at no time 
to exceed one third the membership of the Council; and dropped the 
word " final " as to the decisions of the Council, and sent both original 
and substitute down to the churches. The committee of the Worcester 
Central " unanimously recommended the adoption of the suggestion of 
the State Association, and the recommendation of the committee was 
adopted by the conference with almost entire unanimity." Worcester 
South approves " of the formation of such a committee and so reports 
to the General Association." 

This closes the list of the twenty-five conferences. It is needless to 
call attention to the great diversity of judgment and action. As yet 
there is absolutely no approach to unanimity. There is not even unanim- 
ity upon the presupposition of the specific suggestion made last year, 
the matter of readiness for organic union with the two denominations 
mentioned. Yet it may be said that there is at least a widespread desire 
to know what that union will imply of change and possible profit. 

There are two or three further remarks of a general nature which it 
may be well to make here. 

1 . Several of the conferences have suggested the postponement of their 
action till the State Association has acted, or till the union with the other 
two denominations has been consummated. It is respectfully submitted 
that power in Congregationalism resides in the local churches and not 
in the National Council, nor even this State Association, much less in 
a miscellaneously appointed body of so-called delegates to a council like 
the one at Dayton, and that, therefore, wherever else these changes are 
discussed, with us Congregationalists they must be discussed not only 
in the conference, but especially in each local church. 

2. It was with this fundamental fact of Congregationalism in mind that 
the suggestion was made last year for a " Conciliar Committee " first of 
the conference. Several in criticism of the proposal for this committee 
of the conference have asked if there was to be no power of appeal. It 
was clearly intimated in the paper from the chairman of the committee 
last year that this conference committee was only the first step in a well- 
arranged representative system, and the further steps in that system 
are admirably outlined in a communication from another member of the 
Committee on Polity in the Boston Evening Transcript for Monday, May 
14, 1906. If there is to be a reorganization of the polity of our entire 
system, then there must be appellate power somewhere, and, of course, 
in a representative system, in the higher units of that system. 



1906] Incorporation of the Association G5 

3. The " Conciliar Committee," as suggested last year, whatever else 
it might be, was the first step in a truly representative system. Every 
church in the conference was to have at least the right to representation 
on it. Is anything else likely to be acceptable to the most of Congrega- 
tionalists, with their democratic and individual training? Two other 
substitutes have been suggested for it. The first of these comes from 
the far-away Pacific coast in a private letter from Professor Nash, of our 
Pacific Theological Seminary. There they have already taken steps to vest 
power, not in a committee of the conference, but in the conference or asso- 
ciation itself. The second is that of the churches of Michigan and Wis- 
consin, and substantially of the three Suffolk conferences of our own 
state, where there is a decided movement to vest additional power, as in 
Michigan and Wisconsin, in a small committee of five or seven. Is not 
this a movement in the direction of bureaucratic, rather than truly rep- 
resentative government? If we are to have any change in our polity, must 
it not at the very least be truly and squarely representative? At any 
rate, here are the three suggested modifications of our polity now before 
us: bureaucratic in a small committee of five or seven; truly representa- 
tive in the " Conciliar Committee "; also truly representative in the Con- 
ference or Association itself, not in a committee. 

In closing, your Committee would make the following recommendation 
to the State Association: 

In view of the present great diversity of judgment and plan, this whole 
matter of polity, inclusive of the subject of delegated representation, be re- 
committed to a larger and more widely representative committee of this Asso- 
ciation, and they be instructed to correspond with the individual churches as 
well as conferences on the one hand, and on the other with the Committee on 
Polity of our National Council, and the Committee on Polity appointed at 
Dayton by the Council of last February, and report at the annual meeting 
of 1907. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX THE INCORPORA- 
TION OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

The Committee on Incorporation, through some miscarriage of notice, 
were only recently advised of the duty committed to them by the one 
hundred and third annual meeting of the General Association of the Congre- 
gational Churches of Massachusetts. Notwithstanding this fact, they 
have sought diligently, in the time remaining, to advise themselves regard- 
ing the data which the Association had in mind at the time when the 
committee was constituted. These seem to comprehend certain facts 
having to do with the Massachusetts Home Missionary- Society (Incor- 
porated"), and the efficient control of the same by the churches of Massa- 



66 Incorporation of the Association [1908 

chusetts, which meet annually in convention as a voluntary society, and 
with which the said missionary society is in close affiliation. It is also 
possible that incorporation may have been suggested in order that the 
churches might be amalgamated into a body which can hold property to 
better advantage. 

With this preface your Committee report: 

First, That they find incorporation inadvisable for any body as loosely 
constituted as the Massachusetts General Association wdiere it is desirable 
to retain the character which at present distinguishes this convention as a 
representative conference of the churches through delegates annually 
elected. This because of the lack of certain characteristics which properly 
distinguish every corporation, such as stability in the personnel of its 
membership, continuity in succession, and definiteness in the business 
which it is organized to transact. 

Second, Your Committee find it inadvisable for this particular body to 
change its form or method, if it is to retain the characteristics which make 
it unique as the representative of the Congregational churches in Massa- 
chusetts. This because it is the guardian of an independency which gave 
the first demonstration of the fact that liberty and administration are not 
irreconcilable. 

In this connection your Committee would call attention to the fact that 
whereas students and practical men have for years emphasized the value of 
administration the tide has now turned. It is recognized scientifically 
that the point of equilibrium has been lost in the recent swing of affairs, 
both civic and commercial. The beginnings of a reactionary movement 
are, therefore, plainly visible. With the tide turning toward a reaffirma- 
tion of liberties, it would be unfortunate for Congregationalists to change 
the character of this association which for over a century has transacted 
the business committed to it without transgressing its bounds, and there- 
fore furnishes a concrete example of infinite value to the lawyer and 
sociologist. 

Thus reporting, your Committee begs leave to add that, if it has rightly 
understood the purpose of the Association in suggesting incorporation, 
there are other and better ways in which the objects desired can be attained. 
These are suggested by recent practice which shows the most astute and 
progressive lawyers providing " agreements of association " with holding 
trustees and other requisite machinery. There is no reason, we think, 
why this Association cannot do any business in its province with efficiency, 
through trustees created to hold and administer, or to pay over, the income 
of its funds as instructed; and through subordinate organizations, incorpo- 
rated or not, whose charters shall recognize the Association as a dominant 
and controlling factor. 

D. CHAUNCEY BREWER. 
CHARLES N. PROUTY. 
HENRY H. BOSWORTH. 



THE DAYTON COUNCIL AND CHURCH UNION 

I. The History of the Movement 

REV. ALBERT F. PIERCE, BROCKTOX 



I have been requested to furnish an historical background for the address 
and discussion which are to follow 'this paper, and incidentally to offer 
some views along the line of the proposed union. 

The various steps leading up to the present time are a matter of history; 
have been set forth so fully in our church papers and other periodicals, 
and ought to be so well understood by this time that a repetition of the 
facts would be a work of supererogation. 

It must be confessed, however, that many persons in the beginning 
considered any proposed union with any other body such an iridescent 
dream, and for that reason paid so little attention to it, that now they 
find themselves ignorant respecting what has been going on. Only a few 
weeks ago I received a letter from a pastor of one of the largest churches 
in a state just south of us saying in substance: " Where are we? Is the 
union supposed to be consummated by the action at Dayton? I never 
dreamed of anything beyond federation, a sort of working together, and 
have not kept mysel informed, and so now do not know who I am or where 
we are at. Please send me all the information you can and help me out 
of the woods." I assured the brother that he was still himself, and that 
he might go on preaching where he was without even printing a new head- 
ing to his calendar; but that he would better wake up and join the pro- 
cession, or he would find himself a back number. Church union has betn 
in the air for a long time; let us hope that at last it has its feet on the 
ground and is going somewhere. 

A mere mention of a few facts in the history of the movement may serve 
to stir up our pure minds by way of remembrance, and prepare the way 
for a more intelligent discussion of the issues involved. 

The earliest recorded steps looking toward a union with either of these 
bodies were the resolutions offered to the National Council seventeen years 
ago in Plymouth Church, in this city of Worcister, asking that overtures 
be made to the Methodist Protestant Church with a view to closer federa- 
tion, and ultimately organic union. It was believed by the author of the 
resolut ons that while these bodies were very unlike in name and history, 
there was so much in common between them that there was no good reason 
why they might not join together in wedlock. The same author intro- 
duced similar resolutions in the National Council in the city of Portland, 
Ore., eight years ago, which were unanimously adopted, as the first had 
been. 



6S The Dayton Council and Church Union- [1906 

Shortly after this, negotiations were entered into between certain local 
conferences of the Methodist Protestant and Congregational churches 
in Illinois and Iowa, to ascertain if a union was both desirable and prac- 
tical. And this would soon have issued in something definite in the way 
of union had not the steps been arrested by a movement of much larger 
proportions. About that time leading members of the United Brethren 
and the Methodist Protestant churches discussed the advisability of their 
two bodies uniting. The result of this interchange of opinion was the 
appointment of committees of fifteen from each body to definitely con- 
sider the matter and report. Through overtures made by Dr. William 
Hayes Ward, chairman, our own Committee on Union with Other 
Denominations was invited to be represented at this joint meeting. 
These three committees came together in the city of Pittsburg three years 
ago last month, and after three days of conference appointed a sub-com- 
mittee to meet one month later in the city of Washington, and formulate 
a report to be submitted to the full committee at a later meeting. In the 
following month of July the full committee reconvened in the city of 
Pittsburg, and after two days of discussion adopted unanimously the 
" Syllabus and Letter to the Churches," which was handed down to the 
general bodies, and which finally issued in the General Council held at 
Dayton, Ohio, last February. 

The results reached at Dayton have been widely published and are 
well known. But it should be remembered that the plan of union there 
formulated is only in outline, is yet in the hands of committees for per- 
fection, and is subject to modification at an adjourned meeting of the 
General Council before it comes before our several bodies for final action. 
But the imperfectly wrought out basis of union is substantially, I presume, 
what will be ultimately adopted by the General Council. 

Who are these people with whom we are discussing plans of union? 
Before we marry we like to know something of the character and qualifi- 
cations of the other party. 

John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, never left the Church of Eng- 
land, and would not consent that his followers should do so. Though 
Methodism was introduced into this country in 1766, it was not until 
1784, when the War of the Revolution had practically destroyed the 
English Church among the colonies, that Wesley consented to the formal 
organization of the Methodist church here. In that year, when the 
churches did organize, the itinerant ministers arrogated to themselves all 
legislative, judicial, and executive authority, and denied the right of 
laymen to vote, voice, or membership in the various conference bodies 
of the church. Not only leading laymen but many ministers strongly 
protested against the assumption of such priestly prerogatives. The 
contention continued with increasing vigor until 1S27, when a number of 
laymen and ministers in several of the states were expelled. The only 
charge against them was the disturbance of the peace in discussing and 



1906} The History of the Movement 69 

maintaining the rights of the laity to representation in the various bodies 
of the church. Seeing that all hopes of reformation within the church 
were fruitless, large numbers of ministers and laymen in Maryland, Penn- 
sylvania, Virginia, Ohio, and other states withdrew and formed themselves 
in 1828 into " The Associated Methodist Churches." Two years later 
the organization was completed and the new body took the name of the 
Methodist Protestant Church. Though Methodistic in its forms of wor- 
ship, it is anti-episcopal in its form of government. Its polity is that of 
a representative democracy. It has quarterly, annual, and quadrennial 
conferences (corresponding somewhat to our local and state conferences 
and National Council), in which the ministry and laity are equally repre- 
sented. The church has no bishops nor presiding elders. Methodistic 
in its forms of worship, and coming from a church episcopally governed, 
its polity is that of a representative democracy. It holds strenuously to 
the freedom of the local church and the rights of its individual members. 
Some of its " Elemental Principles " have a certain familiar sound to 
the descendants of the Pilgrims. Listen to the first four: 1. A Christian 
church is a society of believers in Jesus Christ and is of divine institution. 
2. Christ is the only head of the church, and the word of God the only 
rule of faith and practice. 3. No person who loves the Lord Jesus Christ, 
and obeys the Gospel of God our Saviour, ought to be deprived of church 
membership. 4. Every man has an inalienable right to private judgment 
in matters of religion, and an equal right to express his opinion in any way 
which will not violate the laws of God or the rights of his fellow-men. 

While holding to the independency of the local church, the Methodist 
Protestants believe that there are certain interests common to the whole 
body, and that the right of self-government is not surrendered when repre- 
sentative assemblies are created. Hence the following principle: What- 
ever power may be necessary to the formation of rules and regulations, 
is inherent in the ministers and members of the church; but as much of 
that power may be delegated from time to time upon such plan of repre- 
sentation as they may judge necessary and proper. 

The other body with whom we have entered into negotiation, the United 
Brethren in Christ, grew out of a movement on the part of William Otter- 
bein, of the German Reformed Church, and Martin Boehm, a Mennonite, 
to preach to the neglected classes of their own brethren. They sought to 
carry a pure gospel to those in great need. It was an effort at evangel- 
ization, with evangelistic methods. Beginning among the Germans in 
Pennsylvania and Maryland, the interest became so deep and widespread 
that it reached to other states and included all classes in the community. 
Though the movement started as early as 1757, it was not until 1800 that 
a formal organization was effected, this being found necessary in order to 
preserve the fruits of their toil and to secure efficiency in carrying on the 
growing work. The body is Methodistic in its forms and usages, but it 
differs from the Methodist Protestant church in that it has presiding 



70 The Dayton Council and Church Union [1906 

elders, elected annually, and superintendents (whom they call bishops), 
chosen for four-year terms. The body numbers 260,000, has seven col- 
leges, a theological seminary, preparatory schools, a fine publishing plant 
in Dayton, Ohio, and carries on missionary work in several foreign fields. 
These are the two bodies with whom we propose union. 

And be it known that church union is not wholly an unknown quantity 
in the Christian world, albeit it is rather unique so far as the United States 
is concerned. More than twenty years ago the four Methodist denomi- 
nations of Canada, namely, the Methodist Episcopal, the Wesleyan, the 
Free Methodist, and the Bible Christians, united, forming the Methodist 
Church of Canada. In that same country to-day the Presbyterians, Con- 
gregationalists, and Methodists are debating plans of union with a fair 
prospect of success. The same thing can be said of the same churches in 
Australia. But the farthest that steps have ever gone toward union in 
this country has been to bring together dismembered parts of the same 
church. The Old School and the New School Presbyterians, divided in 
1S37 on account of doctrine, were reunited in 1S69. The Methodist 
Protestant Church, north and south, divided before the war on account 
of slavery, reunited in 1S77. But the Presbyterian churches, divided 
before the war by the slavery question, have been unable to come together; 
and the Methodist Episcopal Church and Methodist Episcopal Church 
South, separated by the issues of the war, have deliberated for several 
years, and the most they have been able to do is to jointly edit a hymn 
book, from which they sing: 

" Blest be the tie that binds 
Our hearts in Christian love." 

No, the proposed union is absolutely unique in United States church 
history. In this country we are more used to division and subtraction 
than to combining, or the resolving of fractions into a common denomi- 
nator. And Rev. Dr. Carroll, our church census enumerator, informed us 
in the last decade that our one hundred and forty sects had grown to one 
hundred and forty-one, because our Dunkard brethren were unable to agree 
whether in the matter of feet washing the brothers should perform the 
service for brothers only, and the sisters for sisters, or whether the soLmn 
service of pedal ablution should be performed irrespective of sex distinction. 
Thus will the brethren " tithe mint, anise and cummin," and neglect the 
" weightier matters of the law." 

But, we are asked, if union is to take place, why may it not be between 
bodies that have a common origin and ancestry? which question leads to 
three remarks. 

1. The law of attraction and repulsion in friendship, as in many other 
things, cannot always be explained by a common rule. For instance, in 
spite of what might naturally be expected, the quiet, gentle Isaac takes 
to the hearty, impulsive, roving Esau, rather than to the " plain man, 



1906] The History of the Movement 71 

dwelling in tents." And I must confess that in this my heart always sided 
with Isaac, for I never did like the cold, crafty, self-calculating Jacob, 
never — ■ until long afterwards when he was soundly converted. Why 
Congregationalists should be found courting Methodists rather than 
Presbyterians is only another evidence that you cannot always judge of 
the caprices of the heart or know the way of the human spirit. Besides, 
it takes two to do courting; and while we would gladly respond to over- 
tures from the Presbyterians, it must be frankly admitted that they do 
not encourage any advances in this direction. 

2. Church union to be effective must be on the basis of spiritual affinity 
and not along the lines of history and ancestry. It is not a question of a 
common origin, but of a common life. The union must be vital, not formal. 

The present conditions seem to answer this test. The Methodist Protes- 
tant Church is a protest against an episcopacy that was tyranny. It 
demanded that the rights of the laity should be guaranteed. It believed 
in the right of the local church to govern itself; in the freedom of speech; 
in the right of private judgment in matters of religion; in the equality of 
all rather than the rights of a privileged few; in " a church without a 
bishop " as well as " a state without a king." To maintain these it suf- 
fered ostracism, persecution, and oppression. 

The United Brethren grew out of an effort to carry the gospel to a 
lowly and neglected people. They were dissatisfied with the mere for- 
malism of a ceremonial church. They did not believe that a change of 
heart was effected by a change of robes. They held that life was more 
than liturgy; that the new birth was necessary to salvation; and so they 
preached and maintained the evangelical faith. 

We need not recall the origin of the Congregational Church; how it 
was bom in persecution, and suffered the loss of home and property, and 
endured shipwreck and imprisonment and even martyrdom, that it might 
maintain the freedom of the local church and the right of the individual 
to worship God in his own way without any intervening priesthood. 

Now, here are three bodies, born at different times, under conditions 
wholly dissimilar, with very little in common so far as form and method 
are concerned, wholly unlike in their ancestry and inherited traditions, 
and yet having kinship of spirit. They are alike in this, that they have 
always stood for the right of private judgment in matters of religion, the 
freedom of the local church, and supreme loyalty to Jesus as Lord and 
King. The basis of real unity must always be found in a common spir- 
itual impulse and life. ' 

3. And, thirdly, there must be essential harmony on points of doctrine. 
These two sister denominations we are considering, in their forms, sacra- 
ments, and ordinances, do not differ from us in any important particular. 
In doctrine they are Arminian. Congregationalists are Calvinists by in- 
heritance. For many years they clung to the Westminster Confession 
as their symbol of faith. But they repudiated Calvinism long before they 



72 The Dayton Council and Church Union [1906 

laid aside its symbol. If we were compelled to label ourselves now, we 
might take the name of Calvin, but the voice would still be the voice 
of Jacob while the hands were the hands of Esau. The fact is, the Con- 
gregational church is more Arminian than Calvinistic, and by any doc- 
trinal test we are as near to Methodists as to Presbyterians. While we 
differ in forms, manner, and customs, the heart of our theology is the same. 
Before closing this discussion let us briefly consider some of the advan- 
tages that will accrue to the Congregational Church through union. 

1. Economy of administration. It takes less to administer one plant 
than three. The foreign missionary work of the three churches could not ' 
only be carried on with less expense, but with greater efficiency. And the 
same is true of the various forms of missionary work in our own country. 

2. We would have the inspiration of greater numbers. A million and 
one hundred thousand count for more than six hundred thousand. The 
union would mean larger resources, greater influence, and more enthusiasm. 
In addition, we would cover more territory, which would mean that we 
would be more national and less provincial. Each section of the country 
would modify every other section, and in the end we should have a better 
type of church organization and life than we possess to-day. 

3. Union would give us a better type of Christian experience. Congre- 
gationalism has always been noted for the kind of men it produced. It 
has had the genius for sending forth sturdy sons and daughters. The 
Pilgrim fathers were men of caliber and character. They loved education, 
and the little red schoolhouse was always seen near the little white meet- 
ing-house. Wherever the church went it planted also the college and the 
seminary. The result has been that our Christian life has been predomi- 
nantly of the intellectual type. We have laid the emphasis upon right 
conceptions of the truth. Congregationalism has therefore produced a 
type of Christian experience which, because it was largely intellectual, 
was cold and formal. Now, if we can have mixed with this a little bit of 
the fire and fervor of these other denominations; if we can have, not 
less of the head, but more of the heart and its passion, we shall have a 
higher and better type of Christian experience than we now possess. 

4. Union will furnish us an opportunity and a reason for a readjustment 
of some of our forces. Our various benevolent organizations were all 
formed as close corporations. The churches which were appealed to for 
support had neither vote nor voice in their management. This is true of 
the American Board and of all the home societies. But no one contends 
that it is Congregational. It is Congregational in the sense that it is the 
New England way. And there are some who follow the good old deacon's 
logic and say, " We have always done it this way," ergo, we must. Now 
the time has come, it seems to many, when all of our boards should be 
made in fact what they are in name, Congregational; and union furnishes 
us an opportunity for a readjustment of our polity along this and other lines. 

5. We will become leaders in a great movement. It is not a question 



1906] The. History of the Movement 73 

of the union of three denominations alone, but of many. The trend of 
the age is in the direction of unity, and combination, if not consolidation, 
is the watchword of the hour. 

The time may never come when there shall be only one Protestant 
church in this country. That may be neither wise nor practical. The 
answer to the Saviour's prayer does not require it. Quite likely there 
may be always three great types: (a) The liturgical church, emphasizing 
ritualism and the sacraments, of which the Protestant Episcopal church 
is an exponent; (b) the ecclesiastical, in which power is concentrated in 
the hands of a few, the Methodist Episcopal church being an example; 
and (c) a plain, democratic church, into which will be gathered those who 
stand for simplicity in worship and who maintain the rights of the local 
church. Into this last will be gathered the Dutch Reformed, Presby- 
terians, Congregationalists, Baptists, and many other bodies. Of course, 
outside of these three bodies there will always be wandering stars or comets, 
without a known orbit, — Theosophists, Christian Scientists, Zionists, 
Canaanites, Jebusites, and particularly Gadites. But these will not affect 
the movement of the heavenly bodies. 

But while there may continue many forms, I believe the age of division 
must end. We have gone to the extreme in that direction. The church, 
the body of Christ, has been torn and rent asunder. We must find a way 
to bring the different parts together. Whili the prayer of Christ may not 
mean organic unity, I am sure it does not mean organic division. Christ 
is not glorified through contention. The true church will know how to 
tolerate individual differences while dwelling together in one fami'y. 
Unity does not mean uniformity, but it does mean such a spirit of loyalty 
to the Master and of love for the brethren as will permit of individual 
variety under a common form. Along this line Christian forces must 
draw together. The tide is already setting in this direction, and in this 
great movement I want to see the Congrega ional churches leading. 

There are many who feel that our church holds the vantage ground in 
questions of faith and polity. If there can be found a common basis 
upon which all churches can unite, it will be quite near to that on which 
the churches of the Pilgrim faith now stand. Therefore, it is said, we 
should not enter upon any union that requires an essential modification 
of our polity. To this statement I am sure we all heartily agree. But 
we must keep before us clearly what is involved in the premise. The 
Congregational polity carries within it two principles of equal importance, 
namely, independence and fellowship. The independence of the churches 
we cherish and will never surrender. The right our fathers contended 
for and suffered to secure cannot be yielded under any consideration. 
But this union proposes no such thing. " The unit of our fellowship is 
the local church," and " a freedom which leaves each local church free 
in its separate affairs" is the principle affirmed by the Dayton Council. 
The other bodies would be as slow to yield on this point as ourselves. 



74 The Daytan Council and Church Union [1906 

What of the second article in our Congregational creed? We believe 
as much in fellowship as in the principle of independence; at least we so 
affirm, though we have not worked it out as fully nor emphasized it as 
earnestly. Is it not possible for us to find some way in which common 
interests can be cared for and the great work of the churches carried on 
through cooperative action without the sacrifice of individual freedom? 
The Dayton Council affirms that " the character of our fellowship is that 
of a representative democracy " and that we believe in " a fellowship 
which unites all the churches for mutual care and cooperant action." 
Many of us believe that a representative democracy is the only form that 
guards individual rights and, at the same time, provides for effectiv- 
cooperation. An absolute democracy might be practical for the city of 
Athens but would be impossible for a country as large as the United 
States. Likewise a simple democracy is easily realized in a local church 
or a small group of churches, but is not feasible for a large number. A 
representative gathering is the only method of expressing fellowship and 
of uniting all forces for a common end. The point to be guarded is the 
encroachment upon the rights and interests of the local church. But all 
of this is secured when to the representative assembly are committed only 
tAose interests which are general or common to all of the churches. 

An illustration will serve to make this clear. My own city of Brockton 
is free to manage its interests for itself without interference, just so it 
does not jeopardize the interests of others. But in affairs which concern 
Plymouth County, Brockton has only a representative right, and must 
bow to the will of the majority. The same is true of Plymouth County in 
its relations to the state. And while the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
is free to manage her own concerns, when it comes to those of national 
importance she finds herself only one among many, and must conform 
to the expressed will of the majority. The greatest war this world has 
ever known was fought to overthrow the contention that a state could 
have its own way regardless of the effect of its action upon the nation. 

The same principle holds in the church. Local affairs will be managed 
by each local church, free from outside control. Independence here is 
and must be guaranteed. Liberty to do as the membership wishes, so 
long as the rights of others are not infringed, must be granted. But 
matters of common concern, which belong to all sections alike, the churches 
must care for in their representative capacity. In this way the local 
and annual or state conferences will control affairs peculiarly their own; 
but the interests which concern the entire denomination must be adminis- 
tered through the National or General Conference, which is the church 
in its representative capacity. As individuals surrender certain privi- 
leges when they unite with a local church, so must individual churches 
expect to forego certain prerogatives when they combine with other 
churches. In this manner alone can independence be preserved and fellow- 
ship be secured. 



1906] Some Principles Involved 75 

This paper has already reached the limit assigned it, and yet in closing 
I cannot forbear a word expressing my joy at having before us something 
practical in the way of church union, and having had some humble part 
myself in bringing it to pass. However small the movement may be in 
itself, it is much greater because of what it is the forerunner. Christian 
forces are drawing nearer together. We have been praying for union, and 
our prayers are being answered. Let us not draw back when the Spirit 
is leading, nor marvel at what may be accomplished. Greater things than 
these shall our eyes yet behold if we maintain our courage to the high 
level of our prayers and our convictions. If Burbank, the wizard of Cali- 
fornia, can cause tomatoes to grow upon potato vines, and apple-trees to 
bring forth pears, let us not think anything impossible with God. In 
the secret processes of his will there shall yet be wrought out miracles of 
grace and love that shall far transcend our imagination and our faith. 



II. Some Principles Involved 

BY REV. CHARLES F. CARTER, LEXINGTON 



My associate in this discussion has ably unfolded the leading features 
in the history of this movement and has caused our hearts to glow with 
the fervent spirit of the meeting held at Dayton. My approach to the 
subject is that of one who was not present at that remarkable gathering 
and who has, therefore, to consider the proposal without the direct inspi- 
ration of what must have been almost a modern Pentecost. Perhaps the 
best that one can do in such a situation is to attempt an outlook that 
may be representative of those in the churches to whom the subject has 
come with something of surprise and who have not yet given to it much 
detailed attention, and especially to consider some of the principles in- 
volved in this proposed union. 

It is often noted in our day that a growing sentiment of union is felt 
among Christian people. Men outside the church, as well as those within, 
deplore ecclesiastical divisions and look upon sectarianism as a reproach. 
They welcome signs that the fences are being taken down and a spirit of 
interchange and good fellowship is obtaining among brethren. To the 
common man all this seems to be right. Ministers, too, find their people 
ready and eager to respond to this sentiment. Doubtless every pastor 
in this assembly, unless he be quite new to the calling, has preached 
upon the great text that is in all our minds, overarching this entire dis- 
cussion, the prayerful desire that lets us into the mind of Christ. We 
cannot escape it any more than the flowing river can escape the head 
waters of its source. There stirs in even- heart some pulsation of response 
to the deep longing that all may be one, and whenever the preacher has 



76 The Dayton Council and Church Union [1906 

entered into that desire and has shared it with his people the " Amen " 
has been hearty and sincere. 

Now this sentiment has come to a time of testing. It is met with a 
definite proposal. It is no longer in the air. It has received a challenge. 
For this is no academic discussion in which we are engaged. Action is to 
follow or reaction will set in. This proposal of union affects directly over 
a million people. It traverses some of the deeply cut ruts of historic 
movement. Important in itself, it is even more significant as an object 
lesson and as a possible forerunner of similar movements that happily 
may characterize the present age. To many of us it has something of the 
glad surprise of a dream coming true, and whatever the immediate impres- 
sion, we must be agreed that our churches should receive this proposal 
seriously and accord to the consideration of it their most earnest thought. 
Its possible significance is too great lightly to be set aside. 

In this initial stage of discussion surely we must keep close to the 
fundamentals. The question arises, What must be, in any instance, the 
basis of organic union? The answer is not far to seek. There must be a 
common purpose, a central motive. This constitutes the inner likeness 
and the vital union. Such a motive exists in every church, of whatever 
name, that is organized in dependence on God to promote his kingdom on 
the earth. Whenever this impulse appears as the dominant note, over- 
riding all lesser considerations by its intensity, unity is already at hand. 

But for organic unity this common motive is not enough. Men may 
work in the same spirit and yet not effectively or wisely work together. 
The practical question always follows the primary one, asking whether 
the common purpose is being wrought out by methods that are congenial 
to each other. The question has its various phases and becomes more 
obvious in concrete instances. It is well to recognize that there are con- 
ditions under which organic union is practically impossible. The Roman 
Catholic Church exists to promote the kingdom of God on earth. Toward 
that communion I cherish, with many of my brethren, a profound respect. 
I rejoice that it is here, doing its noble work so efficiently.' I do not see 
how we could get along without it, and I prize the sense of fellowship and 
union, real, inner union, with this venerable and potent church of God. 
Yet for us, as Congregationalists, it would be altogether idle to think of 
organic union with that body as long as we stand for the principle of 
personal liberty and individual autonomy, while the Church of Rome 
maintains the principle of ecclesiastical authority and under this advances 
her peculiar credentials of power. The extreme instance makes the point 
obvious that we cannot successfully unite with those whose principles of 
organization present radical differences from our own. 

Forms of organization and methods of administration, however, may 
differ and yet room be open for practical union, provided these differences 
are not exalted to the rank of essentials. Organic union then becomes 
simply a practical question of willingness to subordinate the differences in 



1906] Some Principles Involved 77 

order to secure greater efficiency. In application, take a step nearer 
home. The Protestant Episcopal Church has the central motive to which 
our own responds, but associated with this it has traditions and methods 
directly affecting the consideration of organic union. Most of us share 
the feeling of Emerson in saying: 

" I like a church, I like a cowl, 
I like a prophet of the soul. 



Yet not for all his faith can see 
Would I that cowled churchman be." 

Well, why not? Would you not, if thereby you could better further the 
kingdom of God? Is it just a matter of prejudice, buttressed by tradi- 
tion? If so, it is unworthy, and a man who finds himself opposing his 
instinctive feelings as an insuperable obstacle to a great, significant 
movement should pray for grace to be willing even to be made a bishop 
for the glory of God. A matter of mere externals should never be allowed, 
from one side or the other, to stand in the way of union, and it never will 
be when the central motive is sufficiently dominant. 

At the same time we freely recognize that there are diversities of opera- 
tion; and as each man is entitled to employ the mode befitting his own 
temperament, so are groups of men warranted in developing their own 
distinctive methods. Emerson himself was a good deal of a priest. Yet 
doubtless he was more of one by being less, and it would be a pity to pre- 
scribe a vestment for one whom it did not fit, just as it would be a mistake 
to prohibit its use by the man whose power would be enhanced by it. 
There are differences which no one holds as essential which yet may prop- 
erly separate one form of active service from another, and such separation 
is no ground for reproach unless the minor difference is unduly exalted. 
If the recognition of the authority of the church is based on some external 
requirement and this is maintained as an excluding test, there can be no 
organic imion with those who regard such a test as non-essential. The 
failure of the Lambeth Articles to secure any practical advance was due 
largely to the impression of an exclusive authority that seemed to be 
implied in them. So long as the Baptists regard immersion as necessary 
to church membership they forbid organic fellowship with those dissenting 
from this view, yet the moment this sacramental rite is conceived as sirnply 
one mode of symbolic' action, there may be union with those preferring 
another form yet recognizing the validity of this. Subordinate beliefs, 
when raised to the rank of essentials, block the way to union and lead to 
the sharp alternative that either the world must be converted to that 
special form of belief or those holding it must modify their claim. For 
there is no proprietary right in matters of faith that can finally be made 
good. Consequently, every proposal looking to the union of those who 



78 The Dayton Council and Church Union [1906 

have differed in belief or polity involves a sifting of the minor matters and 
a new testing of the fundamentals. 

Hence the present proposal requires us to examine ourselves to see if, 
as good Congregationalists, we are also fitted to be good unionists. For 
we have a strong sense of denominational loyalty. The name is a minor 
matter, fraught as it is with dear associations; the organization is second- 
ary, much as we love its peculiar freedom; but the thing that we have 
stood for is a priceless heritage from the past, and we cannot lightly set it 
aside. A principle is ours which we are bound to maintain, and our 
consciences affirm an obligation to the God who has wondrously wrought 
in our history. What is this principle? It is often named as individual 
liberty in matters of faith. It is something more than that. It is the 
conviction of a direct channel open between God and the soul of every 
man, giving him freedom indeed from the dictates of other men, but 
imbuing him with a deepened sense of obligation, first to God, and then 
to his fellows-. This was the noble impulse of our early vigor and the 
forerunner of our growing, modern appreciation of the ultimate worth of 
personality. We have been jealous with a great jealousy for the sanctity 
of the personal life, and if in this we have shared with all the sons of the 
Reformation, still have we not been Protestants of the Protestants, guard- 
ing the individual soul with peculiar solicitude in order that its delicate 
function in the wondrous economy of spiritual revelation might be pre- 
served inviolable and secure? 

If I mistake not, this very principle is one that our brethren of these 
other bodies beholding, rejoice in. Precisely for this immediate responsi- 
bility to God do they desire us still to continue to stand. In this, our 
most cherished principle, they see the guarantee of their freedom. They 
fear the fetters of no imposing conscience from those who have paid for 
their own liberty so great a price. 

This principle has found among us distinctive expression in the region 
of formulated belief. We have been free to use our minds for the clarify- 
ing of faith. Our creeds and declarations may be as numerous as our 
churches, and within the local church there may be, and usually are, as 
many varieties of doctrine as there are members. .We are getting to do 
more than tolerate that state of affairs. We like it. It does us good, 
tending to keep us humble, and making our minds more alert. Within 
our own precincts we are beginning to learn what would have checked the 
too numerous brood of sectarianism long ago. that those who think alike 
do not need each other in their search for truth so much as those who 
differ in their thinking. 

With such a development of our inmost principle, can there be any 
formulated statement on which we with others can agree? Surprising and 
significant answer has come in the Declaration of Faith submitted as the 
basis of this proposed union. One is tempted to speak in terms that may 
sound extravagant. These are meant to be sober and considerate. That 



1906] Some Principles Involved 79 

document impresses me as one of the most remarkable for its purpose 
that has appeared in the history of the Christian church. It is compre- 
hensive, catholic, inclusive; it exalts experience and emphasizes faith, 
declaring the centers of power on which faith depends; it contains not a 
single phrase savoring of the dogmatism that would prescribe belief or erect 
it above faith, yet it is positive and spiritually constructive; providing 
for historic continuity, it holds with the past, and recognizing the pro- 
gressive character of revelation, it steps reverently forth into the future, 
accepting responsibility for present leadership; and it avoids all divisive 
affirmations, not through skill of adroit phrasing, but frankly, by keeping 
close to fundamentals of faith. Beside these qualities is the new note, 
affirming that " men of the Christian faith exist for the service of man, 
... in the maintenance of human freedom, in the deliverance of all those 
that are oppressed, in the enforcement of civic justice, and in the rebuke 
of all unrighteousness." How welcome to the ethical sense and how 
consonant with the earnest spirit of. our age! Is not this declaration of 
faith the open gateway through which we may pass into this larger fellow- 
ship, bearing aloft the banner of intellectual freedom, with joy in our hearts 
and reverent hallelujahs on our lips? 

We must not, however, glory overmuch in our strength. Probably no 
denomination has the defect of its qualities so manifestly as do we. We 
have loved independence and have brought it perilously near to isolation. 
We have stood on our individual rights, being jealous when there was no 
occasion for it, and, seemingly, at times, have almost feared that we might 
come to be of use to each other through closer organization. We have 
kept the word " fellowship " in our dictionary, affirming it to be one of 
two coordinate principles, yet we all know that it has not represented an 
active, tangible fellowship. We have taken counsel with others of our 
brethren, especially when we have chosen new ministers, yet all the time 
we have proposed to do about as we pleased. 

Against this excessive individualism there is a rising tide of dissatis- 
faction. Signs of it abound. Men are getting together in order to do 
more and better work. In Michigan and Wisconsin definite movements 
attest this feeling. It is pervading the West, weak churches especially 
feeling the need of help through closer relation to those that are strong, 
and here in our own state changes of polity are being earnestly discussed. 
Our inherited sense of individual responsibility has been born into an age 
of efficiency through organization, and practically this is a new birth. The 
individual does not become less by cooperation with his neighbor, does 
not relinquish his own convictions by listening to another, does not act 
less wisely by moving on the pathway marked out as the resultant of forces 
which many personalities supply. 

The laymen of our churches are keen and eager to see the methods of 
practical efficiency applied to the common work of the churches. They 
feel that the logic of facts is back of such a proposal as this one now before 



SO The Colkge and the Public Conscience [1906 

us. They also want the comrade touch of shoulder to shoulder in the 
company rank, the strategic power of the well-placed battalion and the 
force of the regiment. They want something that shall render available 
the power of the mass, and at the same time give effectiveness to the unit 
through his place in the larger whole. It is at least reasonable to consider 
whether closer association with these other bodies may not supply some- 
thing of this manifest need. They have something that we do not have 
and we need something that as yet we have not attained. To attempt to 
become organically related to four hundred thousand of our brethren is 
in itself a stimulus of no mean order. Through this gateway, then, in 
humble acknowledgment of our weakness, we may pass into this larger 
fellowship, under the spur of a genuine desire for greater efficiency. 

The significance of this union, should it come to pass, will vary in dif- 
ferent states and communities. Its local problems will not be the same, 
nor will its gains be identical throughout the country. One thing, how- 
ever, it will be, — an object lesson in the recovery - of Christianity toward 
the unity that alone is the goal of the Master's plea. The abiding im- 
pulse is to find out more of the catholic mind of Christ. Somewhere 
there is a basis for union, even in the character of God, and this must be 
the foundation of a purer Christianity than the church has yet realized. 
May I bid you, representatives of this Association, take back to these 
churches of Massachusetts the conviction that we are ready to see what 
God will yet do, that we stand willing in the day of his power, with 
our principles affirmed and our prejudices denied, willing to be led, will- 
ing to act, willing to move out, if may be, into a wider fellowship and a 
more abounding service. 



THE RELATION OF THE COLLEGE TO THE TRAIN- 
ING OF THE PUBLIC CONSCIENCE 

MISS MARY E. WOOLI.EY, MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE 



A recent definition of a college as " a monastery mitigated by football " 
may be interpreted as a clever characterization of the attitude of some 
individuals in some institutions. To go from jest to earnest and under- 
stand it as an epigram embodying a general truth is hitting wide of the 
mark. The college is not an exclusive organization aiming toward a 
selfish end, whether athletic or cultural. The changes are rung upon 
education as a preparation for service, and that thought is built into the 
very foundations of the. American college. The petition to the General 
Assembly of Connecticut in 1701 for a charter for Yale College, that a 
" Collegiate School might be erected in this colony, wherein Youth should 
be instructed in all Parts of Learning to qualify them for Publick Employ- 
ments in Church and Civil State," is simply an expression of the general 



1906] The College and the Public Conscience 81 

thought, which in one form and another is wrought into our institutions 
of higher learning. This spirit was never more strikingly illustrated than 
in the time of the Civil War when the ranks of the bravest and most 
devoted were recruited from the faculty and students of our men's colleges; 
and as loyal and self-sacrificing service came from the institutions for 
women. Within the last month we have had a wonderful object lesson in 
the two great universities on the Pacific coast; in the one, of calmness, 
courage, presence of mind in the face of overwhelming disaster; in the 
other, of self-sacrifice, consideration of others, and skilled sen-ice which 
only the trained mind and hand could give. Not only the spirit of help- 
fulness, but its effective expression is what the country has learned to 
expect from the college in time of emergency. But it is not alone in days 
of war and calamity that it has a right to look for this help; those times, 
thank God, are exceptional — it is in meeting the everyday demands that 
there is really the greatest need. With all the horror of war, its terrible 
waste and destruction, there has been one redeeming feature in its appeal 
to the heroic in men and women. Meanness, self-interest, the petty and 
frivolous do not flourish in those times; they are burned away as the 
stubble is consumed in the path of a great fire. But the heroic qualities 
are as sorely needed in the " everyday life" of the country. We are 
reminded that so-called " exposures " are sometimes dictated by the love 
of a sensation, rather than by a genuine zeal for reform. Yet an honest, 
fair-minded student of conditions in the country to-day cannot deny the 
existence of great evils, social, industrial, and political, and the fact that 
the public conscience is not yet the sensitive organ which it should be. 
Some consciences are born acute, as was evidently the case in the time of 
our Puritan forefathers; some have acuteness thrust upon them, as occa- 
sionally happens to-day; but the great majority acquire acuteness. That 
is, the conscience is a legitimate object of training, and it is as distinct a 
function of education as is the. training of the intellect. The " public 
conscience " is a synthesis of individual conscience?; it is not an abstract 
something affording an edifying subject for discussion on the platform or in 
the periodical. It is easy to write orations on public sentiment as the all- 
powerful social lever, but the practical question is, How is this public senti- 
ment to be created, the public conscience to be trained? Even so far as 
the college is concerned, what is practicable within its sphere of influence? 
It must be admitted at the outset that the college cannot assume all the 
responsibility, that its influence is limited to a few years, and those coming 
not at the most susceptible time of the student's life. Home and school 
have a greater opportunity, and upon the mother in the home and the 
teaeher in the elementary schools rests the heaviest responsibility, with 
the corresponding privilege. But even if the college does not have the 
first or the longest continued chance, it has an exceptionally good one. 
There is the choice of the best material among our youth, the most able 
intellectuallv, the most earnest and high minded. The college has the 



82 The College and the Public Conscience [1906 

best with which to work, — how shall it mold and shape that which is 
put into its hands? 

There are four goals toward which it must aim. They may not be 
reached directly, but they should always be in sight, and the academic ball 
should be guided as definitely toward them as if the contest were athletic, 
instead of moral and spiritual. The first goal may be called ethical insight. 
That there can be no development of a public conscience without it is 
obvious, and yet there is great need in just this direction, not only among 
those who have had little opportunity for ethical training, but even 
within the ranks of those to whom much has been given and from whom 
much should be required. There is often a curious lack of clearness in 
distinguishing wrong from right. Self-interest becomes paramount, and 
a man who would not think of condoning the theft of another man's purse 
does not hesitate to steal his entire business, if it can be done by any means 
that will stop within the limits of the law or without the risk of detection. 
We need to-day the clearness of vision of the Hebrew prophet no less than 
his courage; to hear with the ears o: Amos the voice of God, " Yea, 
though ye offer me burnt offerings and your meat offerings, I will not 
accept them; neither will I regard the peace offerings of your fat beasts. 
. . . But let judgment run down as waters, and righteousness as a mighty 
stream." The very first lesson in this training of the public conscience 
is in the ability to see, and the college fails of its mission unless it opens 
the eyes of its students to the difference between right and wrong. Xor 
is this purely a class-room function. Precept must be reinforced by ex- 
ample, if the teaching is to have any influence upon the taught. Students 
have a very genuine contempt for that which lacks the ring of the true 
metal, and in ethics, as in religion, the college must practice what it 
preaches. It is useless to attempt to teach honor in business and practice 
the condoning of dishonor. 

This ethical insight must include a sense of the value of law and reverence 
for it. Disregard of the authority of law is a very real menace to the 
national life to-day, whether that disregard takes the form of violence in 
industrial strife or race conflict, illegality in corporation or license in 
academic institutions. 

Second, the training of the public conscience implies the development 
of a sense of personal responsibility for the public welfare. Academic 
discussions amount to very little, if they stop with the discussion. A 
man who in time of war simply writes articles and makes speeches 
criticising the way in which other men fight is not considered a very 
valiant defender of his country. Neither the indifferent observer nor the 
caustic critic is the one who can be depended upon to remedy social, 
industrial, and political evils, but rather the man who takes his place in 
the ranks and his part in the battle. Such an attitude does not imply 
obstinacy, unjust criticism of others, or self-sufficiency; it means rather 
the power of seeing another's point of view, of appreciating his good points, 



1906] The College and the Public Conscience 83 

and of forgetfulness of self in the cause. It denotes something more than 
half-hearted interest. I am often reminded in this connection of a story 
told bjr the wife of a Congregational minister in New York, who was at 
a certain football game between Phillips-Andover and Phillips-Exeter. 
Near her sat an old couple from the country, rustic in manner, in dress, 
in speech, but so absorbed in the game that they forgot everything save 
the career of that momentous ball, and when the game reached the crisis, 
the old man nudged his companion excitedly and exclaimed, " Mariar, 
be ye prayin'? " 

It is the spirit of personal devotion to the cause that the college should 
strive to arouse in the men and the women who go out from it the feeling 
that upon them as individuals rests the responsibility of the common 
welfare. Selfishness is the root of all evil, and members of our educated 
and so most highly privileged classes, who think only of their own interests, 
the making of money, the gaining of position, the provision of a com- 
fortable, pleasurable existence for themselves and for those nearest to 
them, are unworthy of the privileges which have been theirs. There are 
splendid proofs to-day that the college men and women are alive to their 
responsibility, are ranging themselves, often at a great personal incon- 
venience and loss, on the side of purity in politics, honor and integrity in 
business, and justice and brotherhood in social relations. This morning's 
paper tells what one university man thinks of his responsibility for the 
public welfare. In connection with his gift of thirty thousand dollars for 
a new settlement house in New Haven, Conn., Professor Farnam says, 
" My reasons for making this offer are that I have long felt the need in 
New Haven of a visible, concrete center of good citizenship. There is 
nothing that stands emphatically for good citizenship. This means many 
things. It means cleaner streets, more sanitary conditions; it means a 
place from which good influences can be brought to bear upon growing 
boys; it means a center where men can obtain knowledge of the character 
of our government and of the responsibilities of citizenship, and where the 
newcomers will learn not only something of the history and resources of 
our own town, but where they may also learn of other parts of the country. 
In a city like New Haven a settlement should also be an outpost of the 
university; a place from which university influences can be diffused, but 
also a place through which university men can learn more of their fellow 
citizens than can be obtained by books." Those, of us who have peculiar 
ties of affection for Brown University are proud of the part which one of 
her Alumni has had this year in turning a search light upon corporation 
corruption, and of the work of another in lifting the politics of his own 
state from the mire. These are only illustrations of the men and women, 
more in number than we realize in the.se days when the harvest is so plenti- 
ful that the workers seem pitifully few, who are seeing as clearly as in the 
days of Isaiah the divine vision, are hearing the divine call, and are answer- 
ing fearlessly, " Here am I; send me." 



84 The College and the Public Conscience [1906 

The training of the public conscience calls for ethical insight, the sense 
of personal responsibility, and, perhaps, even more, the courage of one's 
convictions. The American world is honoring this week a man who 
possessed this quality in a preeminent degree. One paper, in its appre- 
ciation of Carl Schurz, granting his "rare intellectual gifts" and his 
" power as an orator," says that they " might all have gone for nought 
had not they clothed a conscientious judgment and inner purpose which 
nothing coxild shake." Courage is a quality that in man or woman makes 
a powerful appeal to others. It is heroic, but — it is not easy! Being 
true to one's convictions is not difficult to teach in the college class room; 
it is difficult to practice in the world outside. We are loath to admit it 
and cling to our fictions as tenaciously as the small boy of four years who 
prided himself in his bravery. Suddenly meeting a strange dog in a 
vacant lot near his home he unceremoniously fled to the house, but when 
questioned whether he was afraid, answered, " No; I just thought it was 
a good time to see how fast I could run." It is easier to improve the 
opportunity to see how fast we can run, but it is not playing the part of 
a man in the world. The development of this quality tries the mettle 
of a college, for the test in the world outside is sharp and hard to resist. 
A graduate of one of our New England colleges, a man holding prominent 
and honorable position in his own state, said to me a few years after 
graduation, " I had high ideals in college of the supreme value of honor 
and integrity, but I tell you, when you get outside and see that the real 
power is money, it's pretty hard to hold to your ideals," — " pretty hard 
to hold to ideals." There is no one of us who cannot second that state- 
ment from our own experience. 

There is a quality which is a coworker with courage and which may 
be called " staying power." As a people we are righteously indignant, just 
as we are hero worshippers, by spurts! We might well learn from our 
English cousins a certain bull-dog tenacity, which holds on until the reform 
is accomplished, the evil overthrown completely, not in part. We let go 
too soon, belong too often to the class of those who did run well, but, alas, 
could not keep it up until the goal was in sight. 

Ethical insight, a sense of personal responsibility, the courage of one's 
convictions, together with a staying power w-hich will not let the thing 
well begun be ill finished, — all these enter into the training which the 
college must give, but these are clinched, made fast and secure, by Chris- 
tian idealism. A man whom not only Worcester, but the entire country 
has learned to respect and honor, says of the solution of labor difficulties: 
" The introduction of the spirit of conciliation; the recognition of the right 
of agreement, so that the details relating to the conditions of employment 
can be fixed by a positive contract; the readiness to arbitrate when all 
other means have been exhausted; the recognition of the fact that the 
workingman is seeking something beyond his arbitrary living wage, — all 
these influences are the residt of a living spirit in men, which must come 



1906] The Method and the Man 85 

from religious precepts, if at all. We call them the ethics of industry, 
but ethics without religion is always feeble in the power to affect results." 
" Truly, there must be a conscience which is above and outside of ethical 
considerations to lead men to right action." The religion of Christ offers ' 
the solution not only of industrial problems, but of all others which enter 
into the life of humanity. The ethical insight of the Master gave to the 
world the teaching, " Except your righteousness shall exceed the right- 
eousness of the Scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no wise enter into the 
kingdom of Heaven." His sense of personal responsibility for the common 
welfare and his test of relationship, put into words by the great Apostle, 
was " In honor preferring one another " ; the courage of his convictions 
was shown in his righteous condemnation of those who had made the 
Father's house a den of thieves. No ideal of what may be accomplished 
for the welfare of the nation is too lofty for realization by those who work 
in his strength for the establishment of the kingdom of heaven among men. 



THE METHOD AND THE MAN 

REV. CLARENCE F. SWIFT, FALL RIVER 



We come now to the closing minutes of our sessions, sessions filled with 
all sorts and conditions of interests; and our attention is summoned to a 
question of comparative values, of relative worth. Is it the method or 
the man that counts? organization or personality? system or the soul? 
machinery or people? We are to try to clarify our vision of values, rectify 
our sense of proportion, be sure that things are drawn for us in true per- 
spective. We are to remind ourselves that the one thing that counts, 
finally, for any gathering like this, is personality; that this alone is of 
absolute value; that people, men and women, hold the place of supreme 
importance. In every organization which deals with the moral and 
religious, personality is the object of all endeavor and the secret of all 
successful working. 

This is a truth, as old as character itself, yet ever made new to the suc- 
ceeding generations with their new needs. 

It would seem as if Congregationalists might be spared this injunction. 
" We have the Pilgrims to our father, and have never been in bondage " to 
any system, or form, or mechanism. It is grandly true that we, least of 
all, have been in peril of letting any method or device of man lead us 
away from the sense of supreme importance given to the life, the spirit, 
the personality. But as one has followed through this program, along 
with the inspiring sermon and addresses, and the deep devotion of the 
moments of worship, the impression is left of a great emphasis — inevi- 
table, it is true, and needful — upon committees for this and that and the 



86 The Method and the Man [1906 

other interest, till one is reminded of the statement that the nineteenth 
century was a century of organization, when every concern of earth was 
referred to God and a committee. We have been busy with motions and 
amendments and resolves and what not. And this year, in particular, 
we have been giving unusual attention to the simple Pilgrim machine, to 
see if it may not go a little faster and bring forth larger results. We 
have oiled some places where there was friction, readjusted a wheel or 
two, and have been induced to add a new invention (new to us) to its 
primitive simplicity. All this is done wisely, so many of us think, though 
" some doubted." Time alone will tell. 

And even to us, the sons of the Pilgrims, comes with new force the 
questions, " What is it all for? " and " What will make it work? " There 
is but the one answer for both questions. The thing of supreme worth 
is personality. It is not method, but man, that is important; not system, 
but soul; not organization, but people. Personality is the justifying goal 
of all our endeavor, the secret of all successful working. 

In the universe at large, so far as we can read God's mind in planning 
and sustaining it, personality is at the center. God's absorbing purpose 
seems to be that there shall be good men and women in the world. I 
know that sometimes, in thinking of the greatness of the spheres and the 
littleness of man, one agrees with the surprise of the Psalmist, " When I 
consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, 
which thou hast ordained; what is man, that thou art mindful of him?" 
But the deeper thought follows, " Thou hast made him but little lower 
than God," " thou madest him to have dominion." Man, the personality, is 
not an incident in the age-long process, like the fins of the fish and the 
upright posture of the body; man, the personality, is the ultimate goal. 
Personal, human experiences are the only real drama of the universe, 
for which all the rest is stage setting and orchestral prelude. 

Ritschl's, " ethics and the kingdom of God are primary," is only an 
echo of the Christ's " first his kingdom and his righteousness." All is 
personal. Lotze gives fine expression to the great truth, " All being, all 
that we call mode and form, thing and content, the whole sum of nature, 
can be nothing else than the condition for the realization of the good, 
can be as it is only because thus in it the infinite worth of good manifests 
itself." . . "The true reality, that is and ought to be, is not matter 
and is still less idea, but is the living, personal spirit of God, and the 
world of personal spirits he has created. They only are the place in 
which good and good things exist." 

God's great problem is to reach men with his truth and life. God's 
great agency is equally personal. To make infinite love and life 
tangible, accepted, in human lives, God uses human lives which have 
already accepted his love and life. It takes a personality to catch a per- 
sonality. Hosea's fine philosophy is about final for us, " I drew them with 
the cords of a man." 



1906] The Method and the Man S7 

It was in Galilee and Judea, nineteen hundred years ago, that God gave 
the world the great illustration of his method. There and then infinite 
power and wisdom and love found their dwelling in human personality, 
and God said to all the world: " Rehold, the Man! " Jesus could say, in 
all accuracy, " I am the Way," " /, if I be lifted up ... , will draw all 
men." The same principle God would use to-day, only with less worthy 
material. Jesus said, " / am the light," also " Ye are the light." Josiah 
Strong gives apt expression to the truth, " Christ would still seek the lost, 
but he must do it now on our feet. He would still minister, but he must 
do it with our hands. He would still warn and comfort and encourage and 
instruct, but he must do it with our lips. If we refuse to perform these 
offices for him, what right have we to call ourselves members of his 
body, in vital union with him? " 

Truth is not, finally, for truth's sake, but for righteousness' sake, and 
that is always personal. Phillips Brooks said, " I would rather write a 
great biography than any other kind of book, just as I would rather paint 
a great portrait than any other kind of picture." This great prophet of 
personality did something better, — he furnished material for a great biog- 
raphy. President King, the new prophet of personality, is doing the 
same, — teaching and illustrating the fact that truth is powerful only as it 
is personal. The phonograph and the gesturing machine will not suffice; 
there must be the personal teacher or preacher. The device whereby a 
nickel in the slot brings a metal arm and hand jerking out of the hollow- 
ness of a brazen figure to greet the stranger at the church door is not a 
good substitute for the warm-hearted personality, the genuine usher. 
When the writer of Hebrews began to write about faith, he tried to define 
it, and he did as well as any man could. But he despaired of making faith 
real by a definition, and so he gave us the immortal list of illustrations, 
and in Abraham and Moses and Gideon we see w^hat is beyond definition. 

To-day we are interested in the kindred fact, that organization, ma- 
chinery, is powerful only as it is personal. 

But why any machine and organization? Why is not personality 
enough? What need of method if you have the man? 

The one justification for any organization, any mechanism, in moral and 
religious work, is that the organization multiplies the points of personal 
contact. The machinery, rightly planned and used, makes the man more 
effective for good. 

We are seeking all. the time for our denomination, not only a rec- 
ord of good done, but the largest amount of good on the part of the 
men and women who are a part of our body. Assuming the presence 
of life, there may well be the finest possible channel for its expression. 
Assuming the man, there may well be the finest possible method for the 
application of his powers to results. It would be a pathetic sight to see 
the great Dudley Buck trying to get music out of a two-by-four melodion; 
a trained chaffeur driving an ox team. In the quaint figure of the old- 



SS The Method and the Man [1906 

time preacher, " If the iron be blunt, and one do not whet the edge, then 
must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct." 
We are not compelled to choose between man and method, but having 
both we are warned to keep the emphasis where it belongs. For the peril, 
always, of a well-built machine or an elaborate order of worship is that 
the mechanism shall become a substitute for the life. The tool, keen 
edged, can never do the work of the man; the " order of service," designed 
to give expression to the spirit of worship, must be kept as servant, and 
not permitted to become a substitute for the worship which is " in spirit 
and in truth." You will find all grades of emphasis on the mechanism in 
any organization which has grown to maturity; for example, the Christian 
Endeavor Society. At its beginning the mechanism was the method, a 
blessed one, for the more effective use of newly developed life. It has 
often had the same service to method for other companies of young people. 

Often the mechanism of Christian Endeavor has been made the nucleus 
for the initiation of a new life, and has been blessed in its mission. Often, 
alas, the mechanism has been put into a parish as a substitute for life 
among the young, as if the method would do the work without the man. 

We must have organization for largest results; we must have people for 
any result. We may have a machine, we must have the man. A man with 
no method at all may still be mighty. Any method without the man is 
meagre. No machinery is absolutely essential for moral and spiritual 
results. Christ had none. Xo faults in a method can stay the influence 
of a real personality. Better Dudley Buck at the two-by-four melodion, 
than the fine organ of the St. Louis Exposition with a lay figure on the 
bench. Better an old stage coach with live horses and driver, than the 
up-to-date transcontinental express with no steam or engineer. Better 
a flail, with a man at one end of it ready for work, than the complicated 
threshing machine with no workers. Better the fine chemist and the poor 
laboratory, than the contrary arrangement. Better the house of worship 
with the living personality to preach, though there be no deacons or trustees 
or societies or committees, than all the mechanism of a modern church 
and a wooden man to utter abstractions. 

We may have machinery, must have, for largest results, but we must 
have man for any results. Even when it seems that machinery has been 
arranged to do it all, we come ever and again to the essential place of the 
personality. 

This fact was strongly impressed upon my mind as the result of several 
visits to our great cotton mills. I went about among the whirling wheels, 
and speeding belts, and flying spindles, and throbbing looms; the mind 
went back through the generations since there was one person for each 
spindle, to the day when inaroomwiih eighty-five thousand spindles there 
are about eighty-five people, and I said, " Once the person was prominent; 
now the machine is everything; it is all automatic and not at all human." 
But a second impression, and the one that abides in the mind, is of the 



1906] The Method and the Man 89 

limitation of the machine, that it is powerless in itself. At almost every 
step of the transforming process, from growing cotton to finished cloth, the 
call is for the person. How shall the raw material, the bale of cotton, be 
brought into touch with the transforming process? Only by the person. 
And again I learned that we are all John the Baptists, bringing needy souls 
into the presence of the redeeming Christ. When something breaks, how 
is the damage to be repaired? Only by a person. If the teeth of'the carder 
are bent, if the bobbin is empty, if the thread snaps, there must be a person 
to put things right. The fine mechanism of the mills is such that the ma- 
chine will stop if the thread breaks, but no machine knows how to start 
itself again. And I learned anew that "if a man be overtaken in a fault " 
no ecclesiastical mechanism can set him right, but that we " who are 
spiritual," spirit-led persons, are to " restore such an one." 

What is the secret of the varying patterns and figures in the product of 
the loom? Again, only persons. The marvellous Jacquard loom will do 
wondrous things in weaving fancy figures in the cloth, but it cannot 
swerve one iota from its appointed way, and what that way is a person 
decides. Back in the designer's room is the secret of the variations. For 
individuality in the product, there must be personality in the process. And 
if all this be true in the cotton mill, with yards and miles of cloth for its 
goal, how much more in the Congregational churches, with immortal souls 
for their central interest! 

God is calling the sons of the Pilgrims to larger, nobler, finer service 
in his kingdom than they have ever done. 

In doing our work we are not called to choose between man and method, 
one or the other. But, having both, we are called to see that man, not 
method, is master. We are not simply called to get results. If that is 
all, we need not any machinery, not even the simple one our fathers 
bequeathed to us. But we are called to get largest possible results, and 
that means the best possible mechanism our wisdom can devise. Organi- 
zation makes for results by multiplying points of personal contact. The 
more conscious we are of being possessors, as a denomination, of an heri- 
tage of wisdom and devotion and intellectual power, the more must we 
devise the method that shall give these things most effectiveness. We do 
need some better mechanism for best results. The new speed demanded 
by the kingdom is not possible with the ancient engine. The large and 
varied results involved in the present day's life are not possible with the 
old time ecclesiastical spindle and loom. Partly the Pilgrim mechanism 
needs some lubricating, partly a readjustment of details, and partly some 
new wheels and belts. It is a perilous thing for us to break with our past. 
It is far more perilous for us to break with our future. The wise worker 
brings out of his " storehouse things new and old." 

But the thing of absolute value to-day is the thing that was of absolute 
value yesterday. The divine motive power is the same, " not by might 
nor b) r power, but by my spirit." The old principle of work is the same, 



90 - The Method and the Man [1906 

— that divine energy residing in men and women. The open secret of the 
glorious story of the Pilgrim is this, — consecrated persons, devoted men 
and women, led of God. 

New method is only the device for applying old principles, old power, 
to the new work, multiplying points of contact between persons who are 
the goal «f all effort, and persons who are the agents of all successful effort. 
Hosea's fine and final philosophy, " I drew them with the cords of a man," 
gives point to the modern cry, which comes to us to-day: 

" Wanted! Men! 
Not systems, fit and wise; 
Not faiths, with rigid eyes; 
Not wealth, in mountain piles; 
Not power, with gracious smiles; 
N'ot ev'n the potent pen. 
Wanted! Men! " 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



EXPLANATORY 



The tables which follow comprise : 

1. The statistics of the churches, giving the ministers, church member- 
ship, additions, removals, baptisms, Sunday schools and families; the 
statistics of the Young People's Societies; the amounts of benevolences 
and expenses. These tables, in accordance with the vote of the Associ- 
ation, in 1887, are made to conform to those in the Year-Book. 

2. The Conferences of the churches, with the names of officers and the 
times ofmeeting. 

3. The Ministerial Standing, giving the date of ordination of each 
minister, the date of membership, the residence and his " employment." 
The abbreviations " P." and " P.C." are explained below. " W.C." 
means without church; " Prof." means professor; ''CM.," church mis- 
sionary; " T.," teacher; other abbreviations are self-evident. " W.C," 
however, includes many who have retired from active service, and some 
who are in business. 

4. The Ministerial Record, containing lists of ordinations, installations, 
dismissals, marriages and deaths. 

The tables of the first part contain the names of all the Congregational 
churches in Massachusetts, the towns and cities being arranged alphabeti- 
cally; churches in each town according to age. 

Church members and families are reported as numbered January 1, 
1906. Admissions, removals and baptisms cover the year 1905. " Absent " 
are not additional to " males," " females" and " total," but included in 
them. " Sunday school " includes total membership of officers, teachers 
and scholars, January 1, 1906, or when the school is in operation (if not 
at that date), covering " branch schools," " mission schools " and " home 
departments," so far as maintained by the reporting church. 

The months and days in the dates of the organization of churches are 
omitted. They will be found in the publication of 1873, those of churches 
since organized being given in the " Minutes " of each year. Also the 
months and days in the dates of ordination and installation of ministers 
are omitted. The former may be found in the lists of the local Associ- 
ations, which follow the tables. 

" Ordained " denotes the date on which the person was originally set 
apart to the ministry by the " laying-on of hands." " Installed " denotes 
the date of the beginning of his present pastorate. 

In accordance with the recommendation of the National Council, pas- 
tors installed or recognized by council are marked " p.c"; pastors duly 
called by their churches and recognized by some " definite act of the 
church," but not by council, are marked " p."; others in service are not 
marked, but in tabular summaries are counted as " supplies." 

Blanks in any column of figures are never equivalent to " none," but 
mean " no report "; but blanks in the column of ministers do mean that 
the church has no pastor or acting pastor, and the blank is left for the con- 
venience of those who note changes. 

JJ3T" All post-office addresses are to be found in the " List of Minis- 
ters," and NOT IN THE TABLES. 



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01 01 lO -I 01 01 ^ ■ 



' r-or- o ot 



■ O IOO00CO 



; Z - O O X O !-- !- O O O ■ 

oxo-a-f oioic 



O 01 to O O O LO o 



LOO'tfO-t<OOLOOOOTj<OOI^OOOC!-OCO-T'OOOL0 00 0101CCCOO 
S© rf^<Tj<rtOJ^uOO) -< 



'O'l'iiHocooNTjoi'OhOiOMBiooi.ioxoaoanioi 

I HM t)H •* —ICO HIOIO fl H -H 1< 



(SomoiotucjoiocNCfi 



iNOMOHoeo: 



i co ■* io co co o 



co oi— .i^-ror-o 



oo*omi-cm- o ■o-foxoocor-coo'-oor — i-rxcoooi — crrocoo 

^H CO— —■—■•* H [^ NTft-O -H-H X 



:010N«!0S*X»'*!- 



OOiOOOOOO-t-XO'-OCOXCO-HCOOOCO 



g.£°giol 



liOiOCO — OLO'O-fOXuoCOOI^Oi-OOOXI^ — — 0)0 01000 010 
--l-ifllOOO««) -h •* lOi-O-h — rt — rt CO 
mi- CN M 01 I~ — I -h 



> ■* i- ■* x ■* Oi — co o x — i oi o o es co m 



O f O lO 1^ O — O lo lo O ' . . - : I : ' ' r X O O 01 O 01 k 

•* ■* O 01 •* O t? 01 it) CO lO 01 -1" iO O -+ 1 -f lO 0) CO O O lO CO — i LO io 01 Ol ^ « 



tNO0CCI«5ON-f( 








-A 



■sis 



§^St 



Efa" ,tHS H 2 , ?---T^--^;Oi:'-a-. £.c- = : * S"<-d -"3 



i.S 2 sS S 
\< < « 



C • -< oi 73 Z O 






S -"="2 o d <S g±>o j 

^. = 73"tC.3 =b1 S-* S ,«OSO .-a 

^5 . , s ..S -^ - = ^c ojl c d^i 



;iiliri 



Statistics — Churches 



[190G 



1/3 C c io c uo Cm o => io t^ US O « io 
-rcxsor^rrco n c 3 c ;; c -r i- 



) O OMOOCfUlO 
JO WhOiOOMOCQ 

■ x in ^ oi co ci oi -< rt io oi rt co co oi 



55; 



o:^::ci-c;i:c:i-.;:: 



: r- io us u> z> rf co t~ co — t 



©TPCOC-CSO- 



iIOCSOOO 



i ^h o co oi so to o o i~- c 



s o co i- oi so «o co oi co r- us co to ci c c i 



OI OI rH CO CO • 



'CCCOCCO-CCCOlrt 



c oi c -;;tCH:i;:L:c;L--cc 



) 1> r-t iH CO Tf iH 01 ( 



OS- r~ r- oi oi r~ citHt-otr-czr'/-. 

■1 IH 01 01 iH rt r-l tH 10 rH > 



O 01 01 01 r* O CO ■ 



■ oi •* oi oi o os x t- -o -*■ x ■ 






'-t^OC-CTtHM 



OI 01 ■* OI OI Hfl 



[-:n-x- -iz - : 



01 X — t^t^iOCO-^i-O-rXCOOCOTp 


On 

oi 


S^S 


01 


fiHjcifcicsc: 


OOC-rOOSOOOCOt^OOrtOOCO 


05 "* 


c. t^o 


or^oi noi 

H 01 i-l 


NONrHOCOaOO.iHC) 
ii rH 01 01 01 01 


o x — co o co ^ c i - ro - ~ x o oi c x io 
oi^i-ooi hhhhomcih oi -*r» 


§ 


c o 

C H 
Ol -i 


•* eo io os 

in co co io 


MOioovccnnoc 



c-rT:L:«HOCicc — X — co 



oi co- 



ol 01 01 01 Ol 01 01 CO S3 10 CO ■ 



O io = r- — C". 3 01 X 01 X 01 1- C X lo 01 1» 01 r~ 
io x co c co o -r co o t^ io x oi n io oi — r- co -r 



oi c. — r^ co oi 

IO ~ c -* 01 C! 



ci[--<CHOf x:i-c 

X US 10 CO iH IO C CO CO 01 us 






2 = co co — 10 r. . 



: 4 >~ **» 



JlllllflllfS^ll?II«. 



1% l*&m%* ^i:i^P^ri^ s .^^ 



-> -"Stria o fc^ uc t- c--3-c e" £ m se'*'S : - = - ■■ •■ 

'Z~-rtZZ = = i.?i =-5^^1^=.5 3: = i"-otI-.5 = F-?.5.«t 

;yf£aa^a «g5i — 3 — II — tsa 5 ^^^^^^ 



*» - - '" fl "" 






..• s 






.■a p-s £f 3 



dO 



QgSgSQ^WS 



■S-ScSS. 



"H 

8 



(SO 



c s a 

5 :s 



«cc 5 o 3 -S ~ "3 £ -" n = i£ 8 S ' 



• xxr^r^xr^xzx: 



:t^xoo xx 



01 01 01 Ol ( 












h 2 5 '3So u oW 



^saMs^alHES^ 



1906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



soooooo coococccco 



■■;■ 



©OOOOuoCCOCOOOOO OI 

5 3 O I- O O O 3 -in O X 



a b o -r o 



: 8§ = o : 



= i 



lOHCIrt 



q,o_o_q,©.: 
co io^cTocTi 



333333: 
-OOOCCO: 



J CO pnpMf-C-t-OCO 



'HftiT-fi: 



>ooo oo < 

' J O C ; 



; ■ :: c o . ■■: .- - :; 



tt 5 5 o o o£o 



cooooo 

c ooooc 

CO, IOC LOO IS 

NiHiocoeoeo 



o o o c 
n i- .- - 



o I- 5 x o : 
-i oi .; oi c oi x ro : 



o oi_ 



«Ma^obooooiani 

- - r. co x c -- 'O o ci-;: 



t- CO OON'J'NNO 



: co so c lo — x ■ 

ClrtCJOflNI 



I CM »H h -t 



— i O) c X oi co c oi ~ -r : 

noc*OHinoc«i 

t-0100 01.-i-*r- 00_l>i 
rHIQrH lo'cOOl'co" 



-t -t t 
¥ •.■: - 



'ONOO'."l-'"i 

i-H — /■ — I 

WO\tN i 

ofco" 



10 c o c-. CO o o < 



o.3?ib 



OCt^CCOOOC-H 


COOOitCCOO 


OOOOCOOiOOCOOlCCC 


C 1 l0 1 
CO CO 


O ^ lO O O 01 3 — 3 3 X X O 3 X 3 i-0 X 01 3 3 3 3 3 i.O 3 I- O O 3 
9H i-i rf CO i-H f C 01 fl CIO 
OCO iH 


i.O CO 1- X 

-cice 


C C X -f 

^ co oi co 


HeoOOQOtDOU! 

--*. 0, o 


X t- 01 O ~ O f -f o 

hCIh re ■* o 
coco 


t- 


oont ooooc 
t- co i-i >-o ~. io 

co -i 


r- <-o x C co co oi t- 
05ooior»i-coorjim 



3 >o oi ro io r. o : 



J w to X C ■ O t- X I 
- - -. o i.o i-o o i -r o t- i-o tot-ti 



o cs co o c oi o -r cv : 



cccotc; 



C 3 ~ : C i.o x t- ; 



C C Tti OCO I 



(N CM •* X I- lOlOOO 



'XOCCOCOOlOOiOOCOICC— iC0CCr-O-HOt-O— iiOOOM 



-i 01 b- o - 



OiOOOOCMCCCCf C OOOOfliOSC 



1 X i.o oi ~ r r. o : 
: x i.o ^ o io oi -3 ■ 
l -<_ o ChNCI 
of co"^ IH 



01 OI 10 CO CO c 



O O O ffl O : 



L0 --C -I t- 



3 = 3^ 



)iO-t<COOOC0 010i.O 



INNHMQO' 



!??S§«b 



I x o< ■- 




Statistics — Churche 



C C l~- lo c C C : 



■ 4_c C O C C 



. u - ,~ L . „ - - ,- L - ,„ — = c CI c 

■ ci t- t~ c cot t- coo ci iq : 



[1906 



O OO "5 lOO 



J 



cc^^ccicr^K'XTfifNt 



iciio ofi:::i«i:;c«c.CTMrt«!O0 not-o on 



:ci«-ok-?c 



; CI CO O OKfriCMiTMHtiSMMOSO 



joo-* g co t- 



;c^o3cci;cx:cc tccecccccocooc-'oot^eoo oooo no u 



nfiflSnMO n;;u:i-L-;';HGfi 



. ** iH (NiOMCl to • 



o us o w r» i 



WNOhOO CI O 01 -f CI CI O -T CO CI t^OOt^Oi 



"Npi-ccrri 



• o s<5 to ONCCi- 



iHONOfCiONO^n 
CI 01 O r-( CO 



o oo >o o oe co < 



MOOMOCCOO-'COMMHOMe 



CO M — i 



ih c: — r~ . 



> t~ CI t^ <# 



rt tt co-* ■ 



..- to c t re to en--: i~ cm. 



ci t~ : 

CO CI 



C.OO + N CMM 
O rn — o -i -HOC!' 



■ ~. X — t 
; 1^ CI i- : 



O CI to X C CI '" . 



<*l CO » 4.0 t^ CO CI 



-N-iCOOOOtCCXT 01 O CO O ■* O 
4-0 — 4 4.0 o CO C to t~ T t~ to COCO O Ct o 
rj CO COT Ifl ,-j rj 4Q CM CO 



I X CO CO 4H M CI 



?--? = ? ppp ? 



NciooNc-.c'.ch- p. x r. c. c. o r. c. p p o c p p 



S='c: 



e £ t ~* ~ ~. . jj* , a , cj Vi ■§ i 

!:ll<ifllilBi^i=iii 



lOSSIS: 






cS^g: QfaDO^M^gggHgg a 



o> 



<;<; 2 






.5 .2; *.= £ c 

«ScS^J3M cSrScZ 



! |o § , p , §#> os ^^H^^'fe j£ho «§ s sa:si I 






mS2§ 

ccsc 



E 

il 

OC a 
r-i> 

Cl 4.0 



to Ot — 4.0 to X X 



:3NSCf 



C X COCO 



■3 Si 

>5 - D ° 
- 5 -Q -— 

3"i '^fll —""?"«' 






J'lja 5 I go j "3 3 






B5 



1906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditure: 



COCCOCCCCCiSSO oo o c x - - - 



OOO OOO C 3 S O C 



O O O O O : 



<N r- TT M «0 



p O O Q 



g5§2S|5S 



iE 



) O LO N i 



>ooc — cccoo-rc; 
: O O iQO"V»" U»V —"2 OO-tniO 



c c - 
: - 

-.- - 
■o" ~ z. 



a o oo o 
c c c o o 






. ir: i- ~ -. — i" r- - ~ ■ 



op o o o o o w : 



— ~ ~ -J-j 00 X -< 0' 



>©OOOi-HQ©00< 

:ococ-c - c c ■ 
; r- -r i-o x y. x ■•■: io c f 



o o ■* o o o 



!§.«§. £ 



■ v: e r; : x •: - :- lk:.;:: 



ci o O c O •* f 



c x c — c if: x ?j c ?j w 



: — ?i r- -r t~ — r. io o ~ x i- i- -c 



r. x i- :c - t- — — i- /c-rc x r- io r- x ■ - — r. -r ■ 

x ^ n o o o s;MMr.?)2M'rTML')>:ii: 



c/.:rj;o 
it- oo ^ o 

r ioVn 



'OhOUSWOI 



;L:;-jo^:i-:r x ~ o ::ic: 
x ~ o i — :i:i-;c:i::k 



0CCC-^3C0 3CCCt 



sooooo===ooooo- 



■ o oooo o 



::ccnooif)Oi50 ;i 



om:oc::xchox^oomn 






OCr-ISNOSflN-fOCOl 






l- :i::h:-l:n: : 



i io oo © o o o p 






;nc O- 



V? 



- ■- - — r. x y. - -r - i.- - C-. ci io i 

_ ., ._. ,. __ „ ,, ,„ ,_ _ „ o o I 

h OX O o 



- l- — - X O O C i.~ 



;s33non 



c -c f: io o — - io -2 ■ 



: io 3 io -r a ~ ML::rx::t-:::s/:3:.CT-:::ntLi 







'-■S'lflV-aa'S' 



*»" o 

a .3 Q 

g>»lg|llli;ilpyi 



vl 






Statist ics — Ch u rch es 



[1906 





i 


OOOOOlfJCOOO'HOOO'ClCOOiO ic-1 1.0 fCOOMOOCCIOOOOOOOOOC 
c c lo -r o -r » o co -r o — 3 p_ c :r c ci -c c i c p_ t- co x x p t- — io ci ci io — -o tp co i- <-o uo 


i 


£ 


ooi i ofiHSOoooi'coooonooH«Nai*ONC'*oooooo^Hooo 


< 


eOHrtOoooHoooB3NHOOfOMNOMOcnc:cfi:-^oriHOoo 


a 



u 


eS 


— ■CNOico-roiooioco-fXXOi- — ricofiosCrocooXLOOi-rci-rwt^^xr-ocoo 

CIB CI ON rt ,___,-_-* _ 





BOrt*ooooOHOonci»s:i3HCHcao-:KCC"CS"CSSse:ic 

^H CI — 


J 


C]C0 3ClCI')'0C)0HHn'J000Cnr-«C10C10MI^-TCClClCTCICICC 


o 


O "C i-h CO CO CI C CI CI C) CO CO rp O r^ Z! CO CI CI — i .-0 C. -f CO S C X CO — CI X -r CO iO -h -r io o — — 






co <tf • oo>c " °° rt *~ - - ci 


OKCl'l'IMHCIOClOOiSHSNOM-HClClrfaj.inOCCX-SCCCIC.C-rCCCO 


NM(0OOf-lOOINOOOXOO^C'OXOC0-HOXOOL.0C: = C;^;C:CISC:O — ooo 
ci co Ti> ca ~ 


5 

E 


< 


OCiONG1<MNOO'tC.OMf.fl"-INCHKClL';r:--NClCTCtClCC.i:^ 

it< ra co i-i « r-ici ciooch c-iHHxnio w .-* ci co — t~- co r- r^ ci -< — 


H 


« i-o o to o ■* x i< o so x io x x >o x co ci — ci -t to o lo ts x e co x cr 3 c co ci ■-: r- i- io •.; ~ 

t- cix ; c c t :. i: c ■'. /. c - :i n c :. /. ^ - i- i- - n ■■ - x = --:ir.-?i >- — — 

O CO CI r-i -q< t~ CM i-i "3- i-i CI CO — t Ki-i 


tS 


coio o ■* o N ^| ior» o-.O'l* r~ co r- ci t- ci c. o co « co o :o -r ci c- ci o -^ c co — x -o x x o c 

co CI >3 ci oo - :- ■_ :: :: -f i- [ - - , ; : i v; ^ i- c c re t ; :i -r -r - n ci t r o — c X co tc co 

eo in ih no i-i i-i cc « h- . ci «« ci 


s 


to o o O c. ci f OX r- X .-. — i~ -r -^ -o — ci r- — o co r co -r x — -c t — — o — ■ X ■ — ■ co r- -r © 
COnNHClHClHHHMMSN CICO(Mt^ri<-1icOCO HOCC3 -*■ LOO hl-jh h 




— 


h o c ■« t x ciocc "t i< © co i-o io x i-o x co i.o -r i.o t i r ci ci co co r^ ci lo — . co lo 

p p p p p p p p?>p pp p p p P's- p p p p p p p p p p p '/- p r- p P p P P 


1 

i 


"2 

o 

E 


William II. Spence, p. c. '94 
David C. Reid, p. c. '84 
Richard B. Grover, p. '81 
Carl E. Peterson, p. '99 
Augustine P. Manwell, p. '00 
A. Herbert Armes, p. '89 
Oscar F. Stetson, p. c. '02 
Edward P. Seymour, p. '92 
Lyman Whiting, p. '43 
George O. Jenness, p. '01 

Dorr A. Hudson, p. '91 
Albert. F. Earnshaw, p. '98 
Charles N Thorp, p. '97 
John A. Iliggons, p. c. '97 
Gilbert A. Curtis, p. '70 

Hanson E. Tliygeson, p. '87 
Collins G. Burnham, p. c. '79 
Harvey G. Pillsburv, p. c. '82 
Herbert P. Woodin, p. '92 
William W. Jordan, p. c. '84 
Edward L. Ilobein, p. '03 
Frank B. McAllister, p. r. '99 
Isambert B. Stuart, p. '89 
Samson Nicholls, p. '78 
George A. Tewksbury, p. '03 
James T. Berry, p. '98 
Ralph II. White, p. '02 
[lalpli II. While, p. '02 
George W. Andrews, p. '82 
Harlan Page, p. '83 
Harry C. Adams, p. r. '89 
Robert A. MaeFaddcn, p. c'9G 
Frank A. Fuller, p. '90 
Edward II. Rudd, p. c. '87 
John B. Carruthers, p. '83 
George F. Merriam, v. '05 


1 


i 


Dea. Daniel S. Coolidge, 
Dea. Abijah R. Buck, 
William II. Green, 
Swan Ekmark, 
Abner Morse, 
Dea. Herbert P. Dutton, 
Dea. Theron M. Cole, 
Dea. John II. Smead, 
Mrs. J. C. Whiting, 
Mrs. E. J. W. Spencer, 
L. Sidney Atwood, 
George F. White, 
Dea. William R. Fowle, 
Harry W. Jeffers, 
Winthrop F. Butler, 
Mrs. Ernest S. Elder, 
Edward O. Redfield, 
Mrs. U. F. Le Due, 
Rev. C. G. Burnham, 
Arthur B. West, 
James L. Pease, 
Edward W. Breed, 
Lorenz Walker, 
Samuel B. Bates, 
Mrs. Clara F. Hyland," 
Miss Ellen L. Brownell, 
Walter A. Carr, 
Henry W. Billings, 
George W. Guilford, 1 ' 
Mrs. Ruby F. Bird, 
Dea. Henry A. Barton, 
John N. Johnson, 
Dea. 10. A. II. Grover, 
Ralph F. Abbott, 
Wanton II . Gray, 
Edwin S. Morse, 
Mrs. Mary P. Field, 
Benjamin Z. Stebbins, 
Miss E. II. Underwood, 
Nathan A. Howes, 


2 


6 

u 


lo ci © uo x — ' co x o -i o -v © — i i-i cs tt -f ci o -* -+ t^ -r co r -r x - r ia ci c: -r r~ x x >-o r~ c 

- (- ~ C 01 X CO x -r O 01 CI I- — 10 VC -r CO lo CO CO -f - ci -^ i-O CI XZ CO — X LO X -r C CO ~ CO — o 
X x x - X 1- 1- 1- X t- 1- X X X X I- X 1- 1- X X X X x x r~ x r~ X X 1- x •-- X X o X X X X 


Cumbridge, Pilgrim, 

,, Wood Memorial, 
,, Hope, 

Swedish, 
Canton, 
Carlisle, 
Carver, North, 
Charlemont, 1st, 

„ East, 
Charlton, 
Chatham, 
Chelmsford, 2d, North, 

,, Central, 
Chelsea, 1st,* 

,, Central, 
Chester, 1st, 

3d, ] 
Chesterfield, 
Chicopee, 

2d, Falls, ] 
3d, 
Clinton, 

,, German, 
Cohasset, 

,, Beechwood, 
Colerain, 
Concord, 
Conway, 
Cumminglon, 

West, 
Dal ton, 
Dana, 
Danvers, 1st, Center 

Maple st., I 
Dartmouth, South 
Dedham, 
Deerfield, South, 

Dennis, South, 
,, Union, 



1906] 



Sunday Schools. Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



;ccc: 



iOOSOCCCCCOO oooooc 



; L ;x ? = = L " — — ' - ~ ~ - o c c X ccc cc cc 

> «c wc.q. x_ rso b'-cc o o o_ Cl_ "5 OS- CIO 01 m 



iO 01 01 01 C. O 



scsccrrcr 
cssscscss 
:«::; m ..o ?< 1.0 .- 

O rH |4 o x" O W •*' CI 



sssscsssssssssss 

smoossoscccscccc 

s s o cc i- s ■- - - - s :c;cc3:c;i:- - 



c=cccccc=c 



s m — - lc .-ci — i~ i- x >o mm m c 



oioeujo 
oco x ci c wu! ci s o'o'io ■* co 
co -* io hcihcch 



-_ ' — — J- — J. ~- — — -« I~ -— ~_ V '-. _' .. _ _- .".■ T _ . — »■- JJ _ _■ '. I — . I l~ „. — J- ~, , 

-?. M i , ?"." l r??!-i w "."?.- 1 r- 1- .-■ ~ 7 1 1- 1~ ?' / r- ~ / i~ .~ t^ ~ r 1 ?' £° r 3 * 



s cc sssss-sssssscscssm cresses— 
s m s ccccsccc-rssssssinssccsssscci 
c x s CONS x m c /. c m ■: /. : )C i h i; ; i ; 1. 1» c '/. t c s 



• r c y. s m - i - c ~ 



KCXJCC^C:il;C O -7 S — m s 2 -7 S X CI in 10 CI S ! 



■ o o h- h- x r- co < 



t^ 01 rH 



i x m o .c.i 



■ c r : :t r. r r :u: -r i- m m r- m i- r. m e c — c >~ 



co o co t^ c 



i m o t c o o m 



ICOXt-CCX-fmSOCCSSSCCCCCXOC-P'OOO: 



i f c s s I': r. l: n t ci in co 



-»©o©ooaop»or-u5co< 



•ONCtOMOKOCNdC 



) O •* O CO O X • 



i o m r — i 0) ci x 



O rHCO X01 



cooccciocccoc-rcoissoicsss — --cossssccr-s-r'soiss s s co — ci o ; 



r- C C C S X C S O S -p C — m "0 ^ o C 
1-- O ffi H X 01 X — C 01 - 



' co s >n o — ' c — c t^ tc o co ci c. t c. — i co < 
i O « h- 10 — -h rf co 01 — r- +:: 

rHCOrH CO 01 — S <0H 



c ci c c --c c c t~ c-. -■ m m c — c x 



• i--cxc^i:o 



' trT— 5 B h — > - o 5 



^L-l^.l-^f 



r 2 




> ttS i T' ; j if :tsS"s > c ^ S Md > ; 



dies 



HI 



SJJue 



WW. 



cjcjo o. "e ~S.| - »g x 4ccg 



-j - : : od'J'j ooo o o oo 



-S a 



Bo66 opq ccc a 



10 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 



soisonu 



■as*" 



lOoesH^occx-r-rtMrinc-rccccHoujooifl 



ccscr-. cccrcso — ccci-cc^cc-rc — scr:i. 



•:ic;:i 



ccccocsccocoo-ho^: 



:c:xhcio; 



OMUSOMr-lrHlO' 



■XCKt-CIn; 



CXOtCl « 



lOrtlS»hOO< 



lOMDNHHN^rtrtHWOMOOO 



OOMOOhNOMNI 



o ;:i;;M:-rcc--rcK;;ir-tio; 



;c-rt-Oi^n 



OC3CCI- — = C CC.— ~. w t 1^ -C C -r C Z. r~ c: X I 






- i- - -.". — y. - x ~ - '-. - ■ 
t ci — ■-- x -;■ i- , x - x x . 



I iH |H C! l-l 3< rl 11 rH N « ^, n 



■-> O >0 00 iH <0 1 



X CI CI C-. 05 X * 



iK*o* .2 



p^sspz-z~zz/~~~p~o 



"I 






~ ci ci ~. y. -t -I x o o -r o o <-> s: x a cc t ■-- r-- ci t o c -^ — ~ C — -r -w as o r- o »h 6 
pc.ccc.r.pi- p p x t- p p p. p x x r- p x _x x p p x r~ — . p. :p r~ x p. p. p p. 



g d c3 sj'g £.: 



^si<7>s |*Jp^ 



z--<~^-z^-^-z ■^■--~. -z'^-z-'c-z 






►2— l5"5 •'S!^ t. « 



>?■> 



= i--1 



1 II .,11= | c -il|llls? 



3.as3B!' 



3 u-B SS 



2 u : 



7.J' 



jMIJjlMMlJiJMillljjiQ jgjjjj jljlljjl i 

? X re CI T re i- — CI X O 

r~ t-- X X t- x t- r~ x x r- x 



- '-C cc ci ■- ~ ci cc x — cc t -? c ci -r r^ — r cc r. c x x r ci ic a 

ci ci x ' rr : ; x cc x -r p p c p. — -r r; x p p ci --. — x p p x p. p. s 



-XOOCXCCClt-XXXXXt-XXX'Xt-OOMXOO 






<a ^-e S3 3 a t -oi 

.S| 4| -55 = 33 3 5 ■-¥ S^ i. I ? 



5 X < 

- 3 /' ~ 



£ « ^ e 

-JSS'S 






'-^-^wfc^Cei;;^: 



- 



1 



1906] 



Bq 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 

goo oooooo ooooagoooooagaoooooooooooo 
o_ . © o a io a a 

>H i-TeftoVrt 



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oo Nqaqqio io «o 
io"rt" NhMMO co" 



>acaaaaaxaaaaaaaxaaa- 
o cmowoocooo 

o_ o„ io rH Cl_0_"0^ i-ioo 

•h -v co~ efoef efofi-T 



DOOSOOOl 



: a O O 5 S 

^qoSoo 



a a a o : 
o a c a • 
' " -. -. ~ ' 

r-i oi i-i oi ' oi id 



a a a a a o a a 



O 00 "5 ■* rH CO •* , 



t^ oi <n oi m co 



it--C0OI^C0CCC»t^00Cl 



oo ooc 

OIQOOrtOOOl 

-:i/.--roi 
w cs a - 



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1 o o o: 

- - a - . 



,§ = ; 



SOOOriOl 



a / : x a i- i- a ci a a to a 

'.2 ~ '2 - ~ ~f ° c " 



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: a. a c 
■ a a c 



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inii«Hiixc.;:iy.H x a co : 



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Cl rH -f rH 01 B ■* 



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ci to 



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Vj 


— ci ci a x 


to ~ 





o i a i - o- a. io i - a 
rjJ th io © co co 


305 3 


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t~ -f 00 CO rH -H 

OO rH 


a a - x a 

Cl rH -f © 
CO d 


to a 

N r- to 


t a 


HONM»ifOM 
-i Cl rl 


t- to — t-. o a to ci 

(NC1CI CO rH CO 


a o_it- 


a r- a to 10 co a co co co a 

rH ©t- rH 


rHOCOOO O O O 
rf co 


OOiCjiflCluOiOGOO 

93 rH rH 


rn a o a to to to a a o © a x a 


•0 a 1- a 

s 2 


: x 


-1 a 


OO IO CO 
rH -HH 


-lOO 



to o co rn © - — 1 1 a x 1 - 1 x co 1- co i~- ■ 

tO t>- 01 rH r I ;- , - - I :- - - 1 © O rH CO rH t~- 



1 to ci a o o r 



1 rn to co -t a a 1 r- 1 x to •. 



) O CO t» I- O rH t0 t0 -T -f Cl C 

<XrHt^ a — co xc 



1 -f a ro a — a a < — - 01 10 01 



i co to i> ci o ci c 



a t- -a a - 1- '0 a r- a a to a Pi 









-3^^i5^S»t I 



d 5-3 o 5 2 ? > 9 ~f i- S3 2 >-= ? ?^-§ - £ c-' •/£ : : Z > J f- £ 2= J 2 * £-* 
qggo ^50rio3aa5^^- ; r : :s-;<:^a;ui.Sg:-r^"gi<5rj&:M 



rH O .2 „- <U COh SO - Ci ' 






12 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 



! o o — s - C ~ T '* '" t - l~ C C O O CO c c: O i 



CI C) C C CI 3 3 CI O 3 . rlCISSSHJOItHOOS^HtinOHOKOCOOOtOO 



t33333;c — ■--. 33t-3—ci33333-rLOCi-r-r^.-«330 30cooC30C!3 



o c k r. c ci ci ?: c ci r. i^ : 



'ClMf OCCfK^CCi 



O OOO O t 



JOOOOOCOOOOOOOOKTjOO-iOCOOOOO-tOCOOOOOWO 



:cir.ci-coccci;cMCir.o: 



iNO'tfii-iccHcitccnNOO't 1 :! 



IOCCXh; ; ^--.0-^0^00' 



"OhOhOO- 



OONCOOC. 



3dt-Nnc;:c-r-LC:ic.;?:c;isicciH 



c :-. 



• oocKicioeocift 



i«1")"Omhnii:coch 



i;i-r:::i-::izi-i3r;K:;i.'/.5Hi'5Hc;rio 



t o ^ r - re -r r. c : 



03 CI pH - H M 



i-oionm:-:- ji - c :■: o ** io co •* ■ 

NOCCrt o IO rH t-- ci CO 1-1 ■ 



HOftOBNftN 



lOiocooHnoc.cioi- 



lOCOHOiOC^C. ICICC/KCC^C-ft^^O 



'Co-*cnoc:-:-^;c-:ic.!ONiONHHHcq! 

"1 CI CO i-h - ■ 



i = ci -c x ci c 



JMClOfCO' 



C-i- i.o : 



.orjc.CHMo. 



■ ~ -I '- CI l~ - CI CI 



: o - ~ 3 ~ r- ~. 3 ~ i~ x ~ ; 



58 rH rt rH ■ 




Mv-iaS^ijjQgdi^ig g&idjowjw ciJ5^£<r^ 1 6 1 



B*a o o 

Sibil 




life! - I '«■ >.i « 



I ►f-'S 



fehOO GO 



?S £ £ £2 a B"S 

so O O CO OK 






1906] 



I* 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 

oooo ooooooooo oooooooooo oooooooooooc 



.. .- -. ^^xJ^'SJ^oooooro'ODcc^'yjootoooooioooooi 
J2 co ,°.'i?o. 90.-00 <=> O CO O O C O ~ O O -f O C O -T o c c 



WhMOON 



... r. rrrcccc: 
ooooooooooo: 
o_3_qo 3«ioooioo: 
o" o" o" «o" «o cf o* io r-~ co~ us o >. 

Cl 01 CO -t< CO LO C) CI CO i 



oo oooooo ococ 
o o o o o : 



:S5 



C t- 'C r- 



: O 3 O 

c o c 

Tio'cf 



-f co co f io t~ co rji r-- o ■ 



1 r~ ci ci co - o re '0 co x co io - 



HOiONMOt 



icooooo-itccocoxr^ococ xcoo 



erect 
! c co c ■ 
) CO 'O co c 



■PI-? 1 

c c c 

coo 

z O X 

-T ft 



«' a 



' O C) CO X O C. COC1-tiOO« 

■ - co i.o iocs co oeooococoioco— iccoc-ococ 

• * t ".'- = l 10 ."*' "° M _ c "l c ' 5 .' - ' oc .'°. cc . , ~ cl cc . ^V-^ "I. 1 "- **_"* 

lO"iH"r-r U3 Ci'i-h" i-Tr-Tr-i" io"rH o~ ■* 



t i-O r- o -r o -h c ~ ~ io co : 

HNSOCOHiO! 

CO CO CO 'O C0_ C. X X i 



MOOliONfOOtfC.M OHOC: 
CCCOCOOOClrHiCCOi- I o o«ot^>o< 



-n:i-io 






i- io i.o co co -f ~r >o co i-h o -r 

OCO O CO CO CO O Ol M 
NH (OH « H 00 

99 


«500 00I-OOCOhm»OhOOOOiOOCICCCh*C 
rH CO Cl CO OOOO-fr rH CO CI rH rH o 
rH CI CI .-i 


?.< 


1.0 X -f C. 01 o o o o o o X 

««3 Oh CI 


OOOOCOiOOOO-hOCIOOOOCOOOOOOCOhhOOO 


CO 


CO I- O O iO O i-O o o o o o 
HM O CO CI 

e» .-t 


^OOOC801tNOiOOCONM»hOOiO»OMMI»hN 

Cl rH rH Cl rH rH rH rH rH r+ rH Ifl 


!H 


co io o ~. 3-'i-i;riHC io 
CI .-H en o — o 
at CI CO rH iH 


Ci;C~i"tiOCl-tiNC!Clt-iOOOC(lOOiOOOCl'»0'*M 
rH lO0ll> O CO 01 -- O CO CO rH o 
C> -H 



j o o rH >n o x co . 



93 ffl CO CI M f 



i iO O O O t- <D OOOO CO Cl 01 CO t - O o iO CO o c X o o o h- O iO CI o - 



IONNOMO-JHCC3 CO O O O rH io Cl rn Cl X O I iO O O O -f O O O CO O O Cl O Ci CO 



O CO iO o t 
OCOhh, 
i-t-lt o» 



■co^ : 



O O iO CO O C. UO Cl CC ifl CO -c — -f CO C -h CO i.O 01 O CO CO -It C -f -It 

CO Ol O O O rH IO rH CO CO Cl IO O rH (01 O Cl -" Cl 'O 



■ r. - r 
I ci Cl -r 



O O O O O CO O 



"orj 

log 

ill 



9 as 

cj 3 u - 

- ■ ~ f*i -_ 



Ik" 






^■= 



I ft'-' "2 



il - 

> • go cl, 2 a -*.£■=,-< 
QaEHf^ozfoS 



S - * 3 c c 


o. 8 5 ° 


.SoQH £0 _"g 




^<j P Ct;-< tcj: 




jjf z zal^s 


ll rt s«|°w 


•^bbSjS 


» ci oj s c 3; c3 | 




SQQSKSo™ 



M X 9 fl S ^ 5 





-till 



i ^■gj» __ g - 






£ sg S'S ~S"S 

o a oo o 



■tS-s 
.g'Sc 



w "rixww ww n 



14 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 



I *> O "O lO c 



n 3 ?: - i 3 1- m c ;i ; - :i 3 c ; n : d - o . 



-;;)ccictir,n3:oH, 



lOiOHOOflOOnO, 



M^^If.f-QHCKHdtOHOM—OOO "o, 



- 3 -r -f 0» 



•co<Mco-lT»^r.-iOO! 



3333 1-3333333333 — 333 3133 — 3 333333 3 33h3C33hOO •-=£ 



in h h n n n l-j t 



i;:icc-c[-c-:3:i-3-r[-x«rc3::i3":M;?:c-r 



:i o ; x o ; 3 c ci : ; ; h h ci cc h n k :i : ^ ci o ; i- c c s h o c ci B M • 



) ci -f ^ o 3 h id o 3 LI n o c 



ICC13MX(NiaC13 



I O 3 3 1- 3 -r 3 C I c; 3 3 3 3 c: 3 -r C I r. 3 3 n 3 X 3 3 3 C K C CI 3 N c c o . 



H30CI-J3'J'3-J1'3H-33rtC103c:3;nX3H3NHLCa. 






C. 3 h 3 3 3 /: 3 /. 3 C 3 CC 3 T C. ;: : 



— — tt onoo! 



. CI CO - 34 01 CM 



. HiofflHi.3c1-.-r1.c1c.1-3:: 
orci.-crcHLCH s. i-o ci i- c-c. ci i.o o : 



I CI H NCOh. 



' 33 >0 33 h -r o — fflr ~. C. CI CO g C," 
■ I- 33 O 33 — CO-C -3 c. CI 3 m 
< -HO HH >0 <■J.a 






• d 3 C - >-0 - 



/.iC3r-3-rt-H- H HCii 



■ ■crcrci-r- ire r- ■ 



:NCNCiMm H 



IO*CllOH! 



Henry A. Ryder, p. 
Charles L. Skinner, p. 
Robert M. Woods, p. c. 
Everett S. Stackpole, p 
Robert W. Dunbar, p. c 


Calvin M. Clark, p. c. 
James S. Williamson, p 
George L. Gleason, p. c. 
George H. Hubbard, p. 
Leon P. P. Vauthier, p. 
Roland D. Sawyer, p. c 


John D. Waldron, p. 
Edward P. Seymour, p. 
Caleb E. Smith, p. 
Edward A. Robinson, p 
James II. Laird, p. c. 
John O. Paisley, p. c. 




72 -/5~- 



t-C 



^■-'ii 









3.1 £ 



iPo 



ft* 
h_: i 



^H;-=^:|ag^g-j 



:?.3 3 ? " }.???i J3 



1=1 



N iO H C>1 lO t CO ( 



t CO CO 31 -X iO CI r- i.O --3 ' 



) en en o -i- o en '. 



l-XX/fflSMCMlOl 



S ■H- r H-l fl -| W -S 

"31 S % ■— "r- 5 Jx "d - to 



c .SJ" 

IS' 



iOi 



= :-. 



ife, c- 



- 1 HE -csS-o»3 



5 o .5 .£ 3 o o "o "o 

K W HH HH H SK H H K 



1906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



15 



- ooooo c 



Ja 



OOOOCOOOOOOOOOOhjOOOO 
o_ O r- io § 



OOOSOOOOOOOOONOOQOOOOOG 

CO g NCOXC oo coo oooo 



i-Jt- M3«) OO-TwO-rcTO 



fc. <© rH r 



O O OO o o o 
lOOOOOOO 



:oooooo>occccccoo 

ICOOOlOOOIOOOOOOOQ 

:_ O O -O O O -r O 01 O O O C X lO c 
"oSnoOHNHtfcNCMfiF.*!.') O r- CO O "* GO Cl'on io of ,-,•»)< 



■* waq o_ c_ ..- o_ o_ o 4- o c b b c S 



o , — . 



- c i co oo >"o r. - b b -r -r H •? 5 i< 5: lo oi r. x cc oi b -f b •- i ^ ■ 



Si 



111 ssi§§ 



? 5fso ?i ^ ? b5biiii,il55b5 5g5gbiSS?,8.i2si 

---^ ? L'2 i^ 1 "2 ~' l j; -. — . "I -. vl ""."I -.'~ " '-2 = i t-iocfirifc lo o_oi lo_ -3 r= 



; Jj p r- -? — — iconcc 



x o c — oo io o lo : 



I it" O LO o ~ c. c o 



» it io - co lo ?i io — — oo co r- cor- co lo -f 

i c - - co oi -r s ^ /. io - - — x s - oi — oi 
■JOO h n no hn « 



x o o o ci o x co lo o o lo o o ■# oi c x lo co o ; 



01 O 01 co 00 OI 



00 or >o o lo o a 

01 01 01 i-h lo . ->" 



■O0COOOOOOOOOOOOO01L0r-OOOOr-OC0OOC0O-<OOOOOOOOO .5;S 



lo o lo co o : 



CO-CO-hOOCOOI- 



1 lo o -h O CO o c 



lOOOtNOOOCOioOC 






NHOO ^h 



• os 40 o e o -r co o to o oi o lo ~ — x r- o r- t-. co o -f o t- o o oi « h- o r- o co r» o o 
;-hco loo^ocih — co co o oi oi o t- co-hoi i-co^-rr-oi-HCOco lo 

IO rl«)H CI CT. rH CO lo o •* TJH 



o O -r -* oi o O • 



• coco oo ooc 



O O CO -t O O 01 O CO lo X O O O O O lo lo o o 



lo o x lo o o — - o i- o o o -h o c ; 



4 r- co o c r- oi o co o o o lo o -t o lo x o lo 



0850>»0(»0- 



' co co co " b oo co co 



— o lo -t ~ ~ i- c — c. co x : 
o lo oo to r- x oi oi ot 



■ oi lo c lo r'Ss-a 



io CO. o o o ■ 



LO CO 01 01 L0 LO i-H 



OOOO Sj 



r- lo r- co oi co ■- x > o — co -r co — X co r- co. co co co c 



O ~X CO X o r^ O -* : 

-O.-CdOX-O: 
01 hOhci 






f J -3 












"£ 3 ^ - I 

(2 a -of s"i tfr 

1 iyiilllslsl 



fjlllll till |° a i as l1|3| 



Hi 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 





J 


OOOOB010100^0W«>*'#0000 OiOO lOO NOiOOOCOOOOOOOO-T 1 

• o ''. ~ x o - i- i- c — '~ oi o ..- — ri oi o o loo ci co r- ci t c o o o x t- io o ~ 

01 r- 1 TH rH iH i- 1 NH rH — I OI 01 t^ rf COC-1 C< i-H O 113 COCO O O — 1 


i 


1 


lOONNClHHt-UJOiOOClOCIOC'iDOTf CMO ri o OMCM-IC^OIC -.COO 


<! 


XOOTfClOOOOlOOOOTrOC-HXCl Of O rH CI MSOOSO*OCO»HWO 


: 


eS 


>n o co io co t x os t- ci ci ci ■* r- © co o © — i -r x t-- r.t- KHTi , tioo«5«Hoecfi 

CO rH r- I — 1 — 1 rH 01 C) r- ih Tji * "Oh —i M 1H 


q 


O-fOOOO— IHWOHOOOOOOOO COCO OCO ONHIOOOOnOONOON 

01 . w co co h co 


•J 


KfnuotDriTT'j'fHOO-HOfOcoiMci r^xo coco -r t — i o r- o ■ -3/ t o — i x ci o o 


£ 


NNOlOt-NMCOHHHNMfl'OtOHNOl f CO SO rH rf L0) CI 05 O O O O CO C T rf C O 


a 

s 

- 


4 


t 1 o «5 ci n i< t r. c o o o i.o ci x o o ?: io o © x cj c c m^ n x ^ c m c m ; r. c ; 

CO ■* —I —I Of) OI rf (J15HC0H rtNrt t. 


j 


t CO CO O (0 •* CO O Tf O O CO ifl X X O •* CO CI O i-O CO C — i ci co 01 c x co x o © ci c 01 o o 


o" 


oon-oOHtcioofiOfOOHOK o -f o 01 © ic ^ t: t ; ^ x t> h oc — c c 

O) CO IH Tf rH rH rH CO C) i-< rH L0 


E 


< 


OOOtOOOlOtljeiOMMHaXCCOOM COX — O co ci 01 — x co c o 01 rn 01 © — o 
O) OI © 01 O O ^f Hf i-h OI rH CO CI -T 01 CO X X © OQ lOh MHCinCHrf <N CI rf CI 


-n -f -f :d a — x ~ c <o — :r - — -r — c -r ^ coo ox ci © r*- © © © o r~ -f r*- — r- n © 
ci ci - x r o io i.o x x -r c t- cc i- / ~ ■- — a. n ■- x x - x - — ~ t- -c x ci /:ixh 

OlrHCOrHrfrHrHrf CI H H H -I ^O O CI CI rH rH C\ ■* CI rH J- <N 


£ 


CO U0 O X © X 01 O CO rH rH -f O O CO O rH ■* CO O N CC 0C ■* OX©©*rC-r©C0C0r~CCrH 

i-o © x ro -- - o — vo i.o ci -t -r x r i o i x — o o o © o c c o ~. x r~ x r- c ci o o o i-h 

rH ClrHClrH— .CO rH rH rH CM «5 CO COrH rH rHrH rl N rH H H 


1 


x ~ i.o x ri x -^ c ct — i- oi x — ■ co © © c x one r~ — o . m- c; c r — r — t- — X 

c ci - -f — io i.o — oi oo h c oi i- .o i- - ci '0 ©o o co ncci -cccixnci ci o ci 

rHrHrH rH CI r* r4 — CM 






CO i-O © A -f -f -f © — © L0 O CO -t — CO O 01 O — 01 © w CO O -He -T CO -h X X H H T* rH 

o p o oi p ; : :. p ;. : ;. ;. ; ; : p ;. i . : p o pp p p ~ p s © oc p p © p 


i 


o 


George E. Lovejoy, p. c. '73 
Ernest C. Davis, p. c. '94 
Frederick H. Page, p. c. '93 
Herbert G. Mank, p. c. '89 
Henry W. Smith, p. '05 
J. Brainard Thrall, p. c. '78 
Clayton J. Potter, p. c. '04 
Lawrence Phelps, p. '78 
Albert F. Newton, p. '77 
Richard Scoles, p. '80 
Arthur L. Truesdalc, p. '05 
Charles F. Carter, p. c. '83 
Edward E. Bradley, p. c. '93 
Robert N. Fulton, p. c. '03 
Henry L. Bailey, p. c. '89 
Edwin R. Smith, p. c. '92 
Benjamin A. Willmott, p. e. '96 
George F. Kenngott, p. c* '89 
( John M. Greene, p. c.em. '57 
( E. Victor Bigelow, p. c. '91 

George E. Martin, p. c. '79 
Allen C. Ferrin, p. '96 

A. Frederic Dunnels, p. c. '84 
Frank A. L. Lindhohn, p. '98 

W. Stanley Post, p. '93 
Claude A. Butterficld, p. '01 
^Austen T. Kempton, Bapt.]'91 
George W. Owen, p. c. '03 
Charles F. Wccden, p. c. '88 

Arthur J. Covell, p. c. '90 
John A. Johnson, p. c. '92 
William E. Renshaw, p. '84 
William E. Renshaw, p. '84 
Henry H. French, p. c. '81 

IToward L. Torbet, Meth.] '01 


1 


1 


Dea. Geo. W. Dinsmore, 
John R. Hamilton, 
Wilbur E. Rowell, 
Herbert W. Davis, 
Dea. Charles H. Sabin, 
George 0. Currier, 
Thomas S. Morse, 
Walter N. Howe, 
Mrs. Emma P. G. Hall, 
Mrs. E. I. Boynton, 
Mrs. Helen A. Ball, 
James P. Prince, 
George L. Chapin, 
Mrs. Mary E. Dodge, 
Walter P. Sherman, 
John J. Colton, m.d., 
Dea. Andrew Liddell, 
Charles T. Upton, 
Frank A. P. Coburn, 

William H. G. Wight, 
Albert L. Thompson, 
Dea. Francis N. Chase, 
Dea. Albert I>. Mertrud, 
Frank B. Wiggin, 
August P. Anderson, 

A. Lincoln Johnson, 
Jam&s E. Elphingstone, 
Edward S. Francis, 
Guilford S. Newhall, 
Edwin B. Redfield, 
Walter E. Fairbanks, 
Dea. W. Fred. Haskell, 
Carl Carlson, 
Mrs. Annie S. Perkins, 
Mrs. Carrie L. Averill, 
Tenney Morse, 
Dea. Lawrence T. Wight, 
George A. Sargent, 
Charles A. Peterson, 


s 

i 


5 

1 
■5 


L SI IS 

1S7S 
SS3 

ssi; 

780 
719 
70!) 
S22 

1874 
774 

IS! 10 
80S 
717 
S40 
716 

1707 
.820 
820 
830 

839 

845 
84 (i 
877 

884 
885 
Si).", 
7S!i 
807 
835 
032 
850 
800 
80!) 
S88 
720 
854 
649 
874 
870 
897 


Lawrence, South, 

,, Riverside, 

',', United,' 
Lee, , 
Leicester, 
Lenox, 
Leominster, 

North, 
Leverett, 

„ Moore's Corner, 
Lexington, 
Ijincoln, 
littleton, 
Longmeadow, 
Lowell, Pawtucket, 
1st, 
,, 1st Trinitarian, 
Eliot, 

,, John St., 
Kirk St., 
„ High st., 
„ French, 
„ Highland, 
„ Swedish, 
,, Norwegian, 
Ludlow, Center, 
,, Union, 
Lunenburg, 
Lynn, 1st, 
,, Central, 
„ Chestnut st., 
„ North, ] 
„ Scandinavian, 
Lynnfield, Center, 

2d, ] 
Maiden, 1st, 

,, Maple wood, 

„ Linden, 

„ Swedish, 1 



1906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



17 



< 




O OOt^O Cl 3 3 3 3 
q o coax co x^^o 


33 


c 
c 

l-O 


3333030O033303 
LO O O 3 lo 
-ho rn t^ 3 
«)" CO" rn" 


"J 


$0 



1,050 



1,000 

18,721 

1,500 



8,500 

700 





2,200 

4,000 

2,300 

700 





2,000 


88 

o_x_ 


o 


rHOOOOOOOOOOWOO 

3 q rn io q, « 

lo" o"ci" Co" Co" 


>6 


♦$24000 
*2,000 

♦30,00( 

* 17, 000 
35,000 
45,000 
30,000 
00,000 
18,100 
5,000 
3,500 

♦45,000 
30,000 
10,000 
27,000 
40,000 
05,000 

♦40,000 
75,000 


88 

3 3 


O 3 
- 3 

3 3 

L0 3 
CO 


9,500 

♦ 4,000 

5,000 

♦70,000 

♦100000 

15,000 

35,000 

♦5.50(1 

7,850 

♦3,000 

57,500 

10,000 

♦5,000 




S J 


'97 
'78 
'50 
'97 
'57 
1901 
'05 
'72 
'79 
'58 
'98 
'93 
'91 

171 iS 
'99 
'84 
'98 

'71 


03 


I~- 3 
/ / 


rH (- rj< Cl 3 3 IO rH Cl t^ — 1- 3 

tspH/N pop 3 co LCr-r-r- 


frj 


$1,200 
900 
2,500 
1,200 
1,500 
1,200 
1,200 
1,800 
p800 
050 
a200 
2,200 
1 ,000 
1,175 
1,200 
1,200 

3,500 
2,500 


82 
S3 
co of 


O 


800 

900 

700 

1,000 

2,250 

pi, 850 

900 

540 

270 

p3,000 

1 ,500 

aSOO 

140 


B 9- 


$4,150 
1,195 
4,972 
2,250 
4,020 
2,770 
2,779 
4,100 
1,750 
535 
327 
5,730 
1,500 
1,805 
2,195 
3,308 
4,866 
8,000 
0,500 


01 3 

— ro 
C1C1 

t>"rjT 




925 
5,255 
1,100 
6,203 
5,884 

700 
4,020 
1,695 

932 

975 
8,275 
3,500 
1,393 


z 


1 


$91 

32 

830 

95 

0,140 
025 
380 

1,249 
232 
104 
23 

1,189 

1,021 
150 

1,010 
050 
705 
781 
855 


cTr-T 


Cl 3 

CO T 


lo 3 O lo -f 3 01 ~f CO r- 3 -h lo f. 

Cl-H33L0-t33XTrH3O 

rH rH X CO. rH. Cl rH L0_L0 


6 


3 [ - i - i.o t- r. x co ~ s. — o -r ci — 3 ro ~ >-. 

£ rt £ f — -o co lo ci ft-HHCcicc 

m CO Cl_ — rH rH rH rH Cl LO H 

■ co" 


x r~- 

3 ro 
-.lo 
r~" 


■* 3 
X CO 


3 01 lo 3 — lo 01 3 X 3 3 3 T t~- 
L0rHOC0C13 3--CiriC0C0 

r" •* to t>m 

Cl" 


f< 


30033t--33003CCOLC0100t^LO 


X 3 

o 


oo 


C0l3OOOC13 013rH-r33 


in 


OOH»«)clOH30flSflCHi5;c.: 

m (M o-h o • ci cici co-h 


5?', 


coo 


t^XOOWOC0OC133C0L0 3 
CO Cl CO 


i< 


t- C 10 O LO 3 CO 0! LO 01 •}■ 3 ■ X CO CO LO O rH L0 

* t^ co o o ci -h o lo l; co x ci c: c i 

Cl rH Cl rH 


2?j 


3. 3 


3 3 rn rn 3 3 3 3 3 3 01 - 3 3 

Cl r- rf 01 CO IO Cl O 3 rH 


1 s 

52 


lo lo ~. 3 x r- ■* -r x lo lo lo ci x m t^ ci co lo 

Cl i-i O X X X Cl CO Cl 3 3 3 CO — i0 '.0 
6# rH O rH -* COClClrHClCO 


q r " 


01 LO 

CO 


r- 01 r~ t~ 01 3 O O 3 3 X t^ 3 3 

TfCl-HCOX 3 X-HC03 

rH -" rH C5.rH 


i~Ot^XXXOL0C0L0 333t-r-.333L0 

«# <N CO rH rH(N t^Cl (MrH 


ci x 


Cl LO 


^ = -,S = 2°S = ^ = = 


S 


tj C 3 uo -f lo O 3 3 O 3 3 lo CO t~ 3 O -t LO 

S© CO LOrHrH-Ji «*HO ClrH 


X CO 


Cl 3 


3 3 3 lo lo O Cl O O 3 Cl 01 3 3 

CM CO rH 3 


Js 


CO _ to 3 3. t~ 3 1- 3 t^ lo lo 3 3 3 CO 3 t~ lo 
Cl 3 CO Cl 3 t- 3 LO r- CO X 3 X t - — 3 3 
<# rH r*_01 Cl ■* CO CO rH Cl rH 


— -V 


x° 


3 O I"- 3 -* 3. t^ lo 3 t^ Tf lo 3 3 

lOHHJJO 13C«HH-H 


2 




X 3 3 X 3 CO 3 t^ CO 3 3 3 01 3 3 Cl 1^ lO lo 

x co -+ lo re co .-hoi cocirj-co-tcor^r^ 


J* 10 


Cl 3 

x -* 


L0 3 CO rn Cl 3 X Cl Cl 3 X 3 3 
CO 3- ■* r« Cl O t^ t^ Cl t- -H CO 


§ 

X 

a 




3. 3 3 lo 01 lo i.O L0 3 X CO lo C C O O X i-h X 

lo 3 '0 — ci re — i- ~ r- -i- 3 -r — lo lo 3 lo r» 

d-HClClClrH COrH rH ,_, ,H CO rf [^ -J" 


LO-J 


LO 01 
3 3 
01 


r- 3 01 CO — O CO T t- 01 L0 — 

lo t^ -h lo ci 3 i-h ci 3 r- r^ 3 3 lo 


t/3 


Rev. George E. Lovejoy, 

Richard Shiers, 

James D. Gilbert, 

C. E. Preston, 

Augustus R. Smitli, h 

Wallace E. Mason, 

Manton R. Sedgwick, 

Irving B. Look, 

Herbert A. Randall, h 

Frank E. Field, 

Mrs. Ellen M. Pratt, 

Edward P. Nichols, 

Clifford B. Whitney," 

Frank H. Farmer, 

William B. Medlicott, 

Dea. Warren C. Hamblett, h 

Clarence L. Cutler, 

Hector Turnbull, h 

George S. Hull, h 


Km 

E > 


if 

h-Jhh 


Charles W. Streeter, 

Rev. C. A. Butterlield, m 

Mrs. 10. E. Keese, 

John W. McKenzie, h 

William J. Van lluysen, h 

Dea. Benj. II. Crombie, h 

Waldo B. Russell, 1 

John A. Lindberg, 1 

R. George Restall, b 

Fred. Jacobs, 

Edward II. Hosford, hin 

Dea. 11. S. Johnson, Inn 

Rev. Howard L. Torbet, h 

Titer Otto Peterson, 




5 


Lawrence, So., 
„ Riverside, 
„ Trinity, 
„ United, 
Lee, 

Leicester, 
Lenox, 
Leominster, 

North, 
Leverett, 

„ Moore's Cor., 
Lexington, 
Lincoln, 
Littleton, 
Longmeadow, 
Lowell, Pawt't, 
„ 1st, 
„ 1st Trin., 
„ Eliot, 


„ Kirk st., 
„ High St., 
„ French, 
„ Highland, 
,, Swedish, 
,, Norwcr/uoi, 

Ludlow, Center, 
„ Union, 

Lunenberg, 

Lynn, 1st, 
,, Central, 
,, Chestnut st. 
„ North, 
„ Scand., 

Lynnfield, Center, 
2d, 

Mali leu, 1st, 
,, Maplewood, 
„ Linden, 
,, Swedish, 






18 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 



.'- 



so a c-i ci ih 



ICQHrilflHNOOOatONHCl 



; ^ /. i- M - c c m ; ; : 



'-Mo^:;crtOo:i 



/.f:i:i/.;^::c^::i-;: ci ■.- t- : 



r~ S -h S -r c ~ -r : 



-P 



O X Si O l-j o o O iO c • 



-r ci X i- — x - x ti :i >-. :-: X ■- -r '-: -r ■-: s n c i- - c c: >-- ~ 



OOOtNOOOOOOOCOtNrHOr-fTjiNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONOOOO £ C 



COCNMiHOOiOCNOC 



1 O C-l O © X CC ' 



INhNhNhHW' 



lOflt-SOOOOHO 



OOt-tl^3-JC:ri: 



i o * h n ci -h n n . 



noOrtcqoc 



~ -c x n ~ r ri t~ c o 3 L-: : 



OftfrrtCUCKS: 



l U5 ffl «5 *H O ( 



3N5C.T3=:i. 



nrtOfl«0 



iWOWOOi 



OflOTC^i.:: 



■ i.~ ?) ~. '■- ~ — , i.-: C [- — X ^ - x i- X ~ l- -r ~ i- t 
ri ri ■-: i.- r- ci -.; n j: i- c x - ~ ~ — •- :c — x r. t- : 



'BXXHMt 



INn-HS-fl 
W CSlONHrtl 



E^^^PPPP? 



X C OS p p 



. i.~ -r -* c o r. n -^ i 
: p p X !~ p r. r. /. . 









ipiiiJl?iJiiiJi|iiiipi;in« 






-j£s.1=i 






pgza sa'ja-;-:r~c^r -^-roxx fa OOf"i: X fa C fa >■? <1 fa S 



'4- . !■ C-= 



;s~l 






:^£ci^?^ 



: o g>. 

. 5 ? - 

: a a' 

2&; 



•J a Mm 



•If-B 



-O 






143 1& 



S^ts |o' ■ s g § 

' 1^11^1 JIJ3J I 
o<:fa-H 8,ci fco 



:^s 



" — u s 



.=;£■ 



5QOQOO£g^QOPgroa£SOgg 

- t oo (-• « o ^ ^ n - /. ^ :i m -i i.: - -« c x 

r. — — x ■ ci -f -f ci -h t -.ri-M-r-i-r-'--] 

c r- x t- i- i- i- X i- c x i- I- x x r- x x i- 



— re x 2 ; 



I r~ — X X O : 



•c r- -c X : 



X X X X I 





111 1 


■gig 


i 


i ° 

H .5 




rshfiel 

ttapoi 
ynard 

dford, 


f 


g" | 


8.8 


Idlofic 
Idletoi 

ford, 
lbury, 




- 3 
II : 










a a 










0^7 




a ssss 


a 


a s 


s s 


asss 


s^ 


as 


xz 



1906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



1!) 



u 



JOSOO OCCC3C' 



O OH 

O oco 



c c o o cscoocccoo 



c-coosoicccccccooooocooo© 

• o c — c o c c c c c C rr. c 3 x o o -? 

« C C 3 '/ TTI — C C C C -h O CO S CO 



i — r~ -c n -rf rj 



: C CO O O O O Q O 



c c i.c_ 'O c c c c c r r c rr i- ~ - - c >.o_ c c c c l 
lo '-f ec -ri" r.'c ci io-i- "'-c'~~r~~ xc-'lo rc'ci -' c coco' i.o'c. 

CO ~ Cl O -(• --< CO Hfl rt — 01 i-h rH r-l rH 



11 ~CG 
r o" 



:;:;iio co co - 



x 1 - — --. 1 - x — 1 - • 



88§8S 

01 riflMO 



;00CC0CCO3CCC0CCO 
J03! 

■c 1 - c 1 • 






■ - vr - '- i- c -1 - ci - '- co '- - = - r^ 01 c c 3 r- lo x c X — c. r- lo : 

ifno«Hc;T:..-.:;-.T3:?::T?;:xii/.C'CNNMM 






re x ci x ci x cc co r~ cs r- ci lo x 



o o r» o -» 



- z. r c >o cc x c cc ~ cc c 



= c o 01 c x — c 



0C0INO-* 10 1 



— 

- - 



:^M*o;cohC!-;:ii-c-c rcc — c c c 









1 - cc c : 
<#cici- 



o x x cc. re 1.0 ci - c lo ~ x co co t~ o r~ x r- c c c c co -h 10 -t ~ 

rtCI t CO —I -H Cl Tf CO HHHfl cc— ci ci«. — 



iHISU^OOOOOl 






Bh-O O O — l^CC-tOCCCC-CCl — c 
1- X. cc — C Cl — Cl ■- X — ~ s — VC X — '-C cc 
^>rf CM r* 10 -h CCCM— 1 



CC 10 10 -1 Cl — — • 



■ cc re v: 1.0 = x - lo lo uo - 



Ml C CO i.O O O O 



JOCW-O' 



LO i0 X I - CO — '0 — cc r '.0 CO CC X Cl 



~ ~ 1.0 - -c 1 - cc;:::j:r.;o;:; C : 



■ co co •* ci ci co -? co tm-o 



- - - C i.O — - I - — CO ■ CC. I - CO — - CO c 1 CO -~ ~ ~ / - C CC CO 1 1 1 c : 

. _ ,- ci - ci c - r. - -1 1- ci ci :.i.ch;ih5st lo - ci c •- 1- x x >o 
1 ci -h ■* co cc -- c. - ci ci -1 co -- ci . 1 --. co . 



-1 «* co -ico 



^£i 









il 









? Xx =-o S2 ^r4^. /S a3o=S 

g-^^-- , S^5 ^|tc1^5S: 









^ ''ttS- ci M-= i£ 



in°« "gi^ 






--■ 



050J3 :-a cj-tn^S - -s .p -r:^:— " "T'-rc.c -.50 -v. - g -_ -^ ^ -i ^ u 



'_'(.) 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 



c = — C O 01 t~ i-O 01 

— — -r co o< oi ci 



■:cc:i x r . - o 



c c co c-c^:iJt:i; 



I CO CO C CO CI X T ■ 



01 01 s w*o • 



:;:i«o« co i 



O T S3 1H IO ■ 



'O.OCll'O; 



• ooo t^ococococioi-it>- 



o^ o s o o : 



: O O OO iH 3 



i o o ^ o « t 



csooioooooi 



^OOClt-Clt-CIMClOOOON 



i co. oi rr uo ■* oi : 



'ICNttC 



ciMiooriPic.-rNt — r-HMcoo to oi — i co co co r- oi ics oi uo o oi co cc cm co > 



CI 01 01 01 —i — 01 Tf ■- l- 



O "5 NOO^OnCM): fev 



HOH^OHHOOHnnOIOOHHcqOl 


O t- I CI 5 N H o t 1 

rH rH — 01 CO 


OO-icivOi'HCO 


ciccHOr-coceoixoKHon 


r* iH H Ol CO 


XHONClrtClcC 


u-OOrHC5i0C0M(NK30C0fTfO(NOn 
ci co ci i^ ci •-< co x uo -r o -h ^ t^ io 


LOCOOJOOCOB 


uooNHOocis-r 

■* HNNHMrtO 



oro t~- >-o oi cc ■* ■* c 



i — o. -r co — . c i c — t~ r 



■ - : l ^ ^ c. n i . r; '/ c 00 « io Cl ■ 
• CO or O CO O O -i- '0 Tr< --C -> •? -f CO i 



■o r. i.o ~ co. oi . _. 

ci i.o i - -c - -r c i-o lo z 



i CO CO ~ CO C 1 



I -J- f O O Ol io . 



co i-o i - i- c. co x i.o r. 
cc oi ci ci oi ci or. ci cr. 



c.;c:cccc:pcc.o:. 



c-iONOci:i- i.o co - 
or. r. r. p r. ~. ~ ~ ~ : 



ci — — x t~ co — or c x -f — r- i~- or i.o c r - i- 

~ .~ p 7 i~ / 1- 7- ;- 7 =■ ;- t~ r- 7 1- i" -~ /- 



•=» ^"-r ' 



111 114: 



1h5». 



*13? 



2 ckoo a ' 



= ^ c? c— 3 c S 15 5,-q j§ 
» ■ c oi^3:0-r' u 5 5 



".jI^tS |jjf E7 , J.2 2 3£ 



r ~ ~± x 



iC-* -i 03 







-jr-^orE:^---^;:^- 000.= --_ c-.-> % = r- ;S .ti ■ 
~ .i-iO =io''__s.--2 • .=* _ o- 3 £ b ^ S = -^ s li J2 ^ _■ ^ r b 

IJIIJJJJJIJJJJISJJJ J!J |S : - 



- > 5 S c3 S ' 



- ' - - I - — -r ■ C 1 X CO X - T -r -< i 

■ ,- ' c o r -co;; c -c c oi-tcn; 



loooacpnoi 



-< •* oi i< oi oi 01 re ; 






5?°^ -Ilia •/-- gs 






• 



J 906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



< 


<~ 


oooooooooooo ooo ooooooooooooooooooooo 

OOO OOO OOO o c 

o_o o_ o c_oo f-. . co_ co 55 

iH~Tf" Cl" i-Ti-T r-ToO r-" i-T 
6% Cl 


J| 


$0 





5,000 

6,000 

900 

18,300 

4,000 

750 



11,000 



700 

4,000 



5,600 




15,000 

1,000 







1,200 



2,000 

330 



13,615 

1,800 

170 



6,434 

5,600 

500 



6,094 




$5,500 
18,000 
16,000 
50,000 
58,000 

5,000 
20,500 
13,000 
21,700 

7,000 
35,500 
12,000 

3,800 
' 4,000 

3,000 

5,000 

* 150000 

55,300 

*18CO0O 

34,600 

30,000 

*103000 

75,000 

8,500 

75,000 

100,000 

65,000 

19,000 

28,700 

9,500 

17,000 

6,600 

9,000 

6,000 

100,000 

14,000 

34,000 


-3 Jc 


cc i - i- cc — ~ c. cc c i co i - ci — -r — i- — X A. — cc o o ~ -r /- - 1 — o a — o ■-. o a - co 

CO X CO CO CC O CO CO CC C. CO O T CC !~ -f O Tf X O 1- cr. O CO cc I- 1- cc CC Cl I- CC CO CO cc - Cl 
rx--~t^--*t~-~ 03 O - " ------- 


¥ 


$000 

900 

800 

3,000 

2,500 

500 

1 ,000 

750 

pi, 500 

1,200 

1,500 

1,200 

400 

350 

600 

700 

al75 

4,200 

3,500 

5,000 

2,700 

1,000 

3,000 

p2,5O0 

425 

2,500 

2,500 

2,000 

1,350 

1 ,500 

700 

pi, 200 

1,100 

800 

800 

1 ,900 

800 

1,000 




$59S 

2,450 

1,550 

6,000 

0,300 

660 

3,000 

1,200 

2,318 

2,087 

4,035 

2,101 

265 

025 

845 

380 

142 

19,527 

6,050 

17,842 

6,724 

1,600 

9.407 

38,491 

815 

8,236 

6.73S 

5,785 

2,485 
1 ,225 
2,464 
1,358 
1,280 
950 
6,095 
1 ,200 
2,115 


a 
H 

iC 


H 


$36 

71 

60 

14,573 

2,376 

65 

473 

102 

807 

1,150 

1,958 

15 
40 
85 
64 

12 

7,702 

5,176 

33,1 I5S 

5,227 

104 

2,237 

1,808 

88 

1,234 

4,930 

2,420 

517 

225 

47 

148 

140 

302 

172 

10,539 

314 

544 





C O '-C C MC c i.o c X O C O O •? M C 1 N f O i 1 o a N O Cl f 1 ■* Nin O N C CC C l '/ C " i 

»mootcic.:i or-. ci onocm c o — ci r- x ci i* ci c i a -t — 

— i Cl CICOr- t^MCC"* MH ci^bhh X — —i 

t>%H -<"ci"^ •* 


:H 


OOOOCOOOOr-OOOOOCOOr-OOOOClOOdOO-'OCOCI'OOCO 
» Cl Cl Cl OOOp O Cl Cl h -i Cl iH i-l 


en 
uci 


OOOCCOOOOOlcOX COcOr^CO-tfOCcOCOOClOlClcOOClOO — lOOClOOCOIMiMCCl 

m -i-H -i ph ci r- r- o -* ^ o rt co ^ ci ^ ^c-i-i--ci 

10 — i Cl X 


V 


OOO — OOCOOr^OcCOCl-i"— r^ocixcooo-too-foocccxcooxxcooo 
«? —1 co o ©est- w— i , — * cc cc o ci ci ci cc co — — o — i o co — -? 

CO Cl ^t»Nh *h ho)h r- 


si 


OOO i-0 A i-C — ~ i.O ~ Cl Cl ~ CC o CC o re O CC A Cl A Cl 1- iC X Cl CO C X CO CO CC x ■ — r c. 

«© Cd CC — O CO Cl O rf —I O CO CC -t I- — CO C 1 CO O CO CO O Cl — i X O CO CO f 
i-IJO -I CI 01 if OJJ«C t-l- HON rH_ tH 
CO-" HHBiH rt CO-" 


5| 


coooxooocooi^cooo^fooo — cicjioicoxocc-roooociciocor^oo 

<cc# — -ixcitp do t- — .-i oo © t en ih ^ — -i o — — 

o -i ~ -i co 


3 


o o o o ci o o tjh r — c o r- o o ci o cc o -r x o c ci o ci ci c -r o -f o o co co x c o 

«§> Cl-H CO CICO^ ECOli hh MII5«3»H i-h CO - -. 

o r- ci ci ci © 
d —1 


: i 


cc o o c t o c. o o i- c i x r r. ci ci - t- x ci cc — co co — f o — r- c r- o ci r» o o c — 
— -* o o ci — cooeir- -i-cci r- t- -f cc ci co co -f r^o r- r- ^ co tm>co x cc X 
m o co — i — i ci o or~co-cricor~TriTtix— i x — 
-T <N 05 co" ~ co" 


"i 


1 


iooo**eoosso3oeo«ooosfioo»MO ooooxo — oocoo 
co co-t^co o r- — r~ ci o o o o co -c» r- r~ x ci i< -r ^ — o © o •? 


§ 


£ 


o-HX-fcor^ooco-icixco— ioocoor-ccci— ir~cooocc — . o-rccxor-ccxc-H 
cc o x cc o i-0 -v o -f cc — — ci ic cc x o co o ci r- -r ci -t cc o o r- co -f o cc cc -r o o co C- 

rH -* CO —i MH^IH iH Cl Cl Tf CO — Cl Cl CO Cl CO Cl Cl — l-l H M * H f 1 


1 


Stephen \V. Beach, 
George B. Haven, 
Frederick B. Ilawcs, 
E. Norris Milliken, 
William E. Sargent, 
Dea. Horatio Moore," 
William T. Humphreys, 
J. N. Dummer, b 
Jolm S. Lunt, h 
Dea. Charles A. Bliss, 
Charles W. Perry, jr., li 
Franklin N. Conant, 
Miss Susie Leffingwell, 
Alvan W. Chapin, 
W. II. Sheldon, h 
Daniel Ballard," h 
Eugene Bullard, 
Louis C. Smith, 
Charles A. Sanders, h 
Charles D. Kepner, h 
Chauncy B. Coun, h 
Rev. Henry E. Oxnard, 
Daniel P. Jewett, 
J. Weston Allen, 
Dea. Edward W. Mann, 
William W. Butler, 
R. F. Armstrong, 
William II . Gere, 
Alexander Caird, h 
Dea. D. W. Carney, 
Rev. John Whitehill, 
Mrs. F. B. Gurney, h 
Miss Edith M. Gregor, 
Francis II. Atwood, h 
Dea. Irving 0. Darling, h 
Arthur F. Whitin, 
Benjamin W. Brown, h 
Alvin L. Newman, h 




' 


Natick, South, 
Needham, 
New Bedford, A. 
„ North, 
,, Trinitarian, 
New Braintree, 
Newbury, 

„ " Byfield, 
Newburyport, N. 
,, Prospect st., 
„ Belleville, 
„ Whileficld, 
New Marlboro, 
„ Southfiold, 
„ Mill River, 
New Salem, 

North, 
Newton, 1st, 
„ 2d, West, 
„ Eliot, 
,, Auburndale, 
„ North, 
,, Newtonvillc, 
,, Iliglilands, 
Norfolk, 
North Adams, 
Northampton, 1st 
,, Edwards, 
,, Florence, 
North Andover, 
North Attleboro, 
„ A. Falls, 
,, Trinity, 
Northboro, 
Northbridge, C, 
„ Whitinsville, 
„ Rockdale, 
North Brookfield, 



L>_> 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 



<ooo©iooe>ia 10 

r~ c ~. — ci CI ~ re re 

«-H CO" CO M 



X O O O O CI 



ii^Z^u-c^:^ 



OOCOOOO00— UNi-HOOp'MOMOC' 






3OH0H0i;txxt3C'-i;:MT-i:]J::i:c:ci0N0 o 



c o:i'*NOfi:ir;i.io:i3MF.F.H:i;;T.j:icxsfiC5i 



OCO-*OOO=C0OOOOOCCOOCSrtri3— ^COOC: — COCICCCOOO^O 



: O C O O O O C O O ■* O •* O O i 



sc-joococisooctssccccc 



< CI QCIOOtlOMtllOMHOCMCJhHlOCIhOOM^^CCt^^ClO' 



)onofMH*t-c:^x:CMx;s)SfirtOc: 



'OO^ifflOO 



MH9«OeOONMOOOMHHO«OHNOOOSONOH. 






c o c ci c -h - o — o o x c - - - - - i.-: x - - 3 n ci c - ri — i ci c:i r'::f:i- x 



i oo th <o -< eo i 



CI H M rf N , 



liHOOiai-tCRrHMlOOO" 



• — :c or. 



Z-70-T- — O — ~ .: C — -TO C X 



Nhoih ci i- ci c. i^ m ro c : 



IOMOHKC.CI-C. 



-. i- .-. w ^. ^- _ . - . — . — *--•—' i- --r *~ o 

- - ci - - o t~ o o cc O c ci o •* — x t, 



< X o cj r- o - -z t r - — re r ■/: x r -c — s_ ~ -r -r o co o -r ; 



'N^NOOOffiNOI 



; o r~ ~r a i-~ -c c — ci ci re ci o o — ;c o re i 

J^xco o«M:i»:i3HMxrin ^ : 



to o o t- !■» o a i 



O w ^ CI -J O O CI O -* O CI O X — : 

peppppppooosoe-. o: 



c o p p Ol < 



St- £38 ^xcoci o r-i ■* co so -o x 

?^p? p p p. p c-.pc-.ypy: p 

►5 r. . 






r — r-r- re re re r. r- ci:::- 

c. c.t^c-. ~ ~ c. -c ~ T- c. t~ c t- p : 



e. r- ?o s- 



= ^ . 






li«s«i||^w^d|a£s 2 






I^t'hJ^ 9.o R !IL' s^"^"cl 

mu% m&*\ m&i 

£1***8 215***1 Ssl^J 



l="|i f* ►;§§ 

= -- = _- 5 ■ si-—.,; 



t. = ~i~ 



:^-?^-,>aE?c^ 



S m o o—S'-^ c^S^ ^tj 3 3^S'-^; _ S -^ _i — ' >.S j> ;Z'/-~i- 8- — ^S-gJ 



xx~ t^t^-xr^r^xxxc 



iStfi 



CIS 

= :- 
- = 



IS 

Eh « 



Sis 



j S o K| > gc_ ^ |||, 

i c : . . .ao*c>> 

; - - - -.ss - - -ss i->= - 

, fXiPn &, a, &, eu o" 



1906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



■S.l 






5 




ooooooooccooooocoooooooooooooooo ooccoo 

CO 5 IH in g 


'o §■ 

>p 

CO 


$3,000 
3,550 
6,093 
1,053 
4,350 

2,700 


1,301 

25,954 

2,000 





7,000 



1 ,200 







3,577 

700 

1,520 

1,000 

2,079 







1 ,000 

1,050 

300 

225 
1,000 
1 ,500 
2,500 
4,300 


$20,000 

5,000 

20,000 

37,500 

6,000 

900 

25,000 

*4,50() 

0,000 

2,800 

16,000 

"5,250 

12,000 

1 1 ,500 

5,000 

33,000 

9,000 

4,300 

2,500 

2,000 

10,000 

4,700 

7,000 

4,000 

112,500 

4,000 

30,000 

12,000 

2,400 
2,500 
23,000 
0,000 

3,200 
1,500 
10,000 
3,500 
*40,000 
20,000 


'88 
'36 
'82 
'83 
'14 
'00 
'93 
'90 

'13 

'17 
'47 
'77 
1 767 
'44 
'84 
'85 
'40 
'69 
'fill 
'95 
'33 

1 7N5 

'52 

'53 

'97 

'46 

'20 
'40 
'41 

'30 

'48 
'38 
•42 
'71 
'70 


$2,000 

800 
1,000 
1,500 

GOO 

a200 

pi, 500 

720 
p850 

250 
1,050 

800 
1,000 
1 ,000 

GOO 
1,900 

a700 

50 

75 

1,000 

a475 

soo 

4,000 

aOOO 

2,000 

p 1 ,250 

a720 

450 

p700 

1,475 

800 

a720 

650 

a500 

1 ,200 

a700 

2,200 

1 ,500 


t§« 


$3,262 

1,000 

1,560 

5,184 

790 

137 

3,283 

1 ,350 

1,200 

310 

2,563 
4,588 
1,138 
4,746 
800 

90 

100 

2,154 

1 ,229 
542 

8,605 
500 

3,200 

2,217 
220 
500 
800 

3,435 
30S 

825 

300 

1 ,400 

700 

5,340 

3,812 


z 


H 


co -f x —i ci -c — it ro — ■- x — - :o i - ~ .-. — - ~ / :o r - io ~ o i c i x — o x — co i- x -r — 

— i 1 - — O X CI - : 01 — CO t — O -1- X CI 01 MHUIClClrHl-tos -f t>C-OKCC. 
^ rt t OHH IS ClOrtSJ lO CS « *Nh lo ih o o o_ 


o 

9< 


Q co o -j o -t< o c r- o ci x o lo -o o o o o ci lo o lo ci r~ co -- x o o xoo>ocicor-o 
lo p-i corn cic-. oo Mhojo cir^o HHnto <tf co o tc co 


0»OOOOOOOOMONO«!OOOOOOOIOO*OOHOH I^OOCOOCCOC 
» pH Ifl CI CO CO 


ui 
en 


OOCOiOOOCCOOOOLOCOOOXOi-OCOOS-t-f — CIOCOO-T lo O C lo CO O CI r~ O 

«G r~ ph ci h ci t- io i_o co co ih o 


oor-ooocoooo-t~---ro-i-ooo^ooici-i-oocioci OOO CI OOOOO 

X) lo 00 O Ci CO 01 CO OtCOrf rn p-i CI p- p- CI 

5© H CI LO H r-l 




-jo o - O CI o >o lo O O - ~ lO X -t lO -f lO -r i- ■- X X. X t- O O 01 C Ci O O X lO X CI o -* o 

X CO LO X CI CI CO ci c-. O 3 CI -t< p* o — i O f CIO -H t^ CO t^r-X 


O O ph O O O CI O C O lo O O O O lo O LO O O O O p* Ttn X O O LO O CI X O O -f O LO C -» CO 
«/» CO LO rl N ■* i-hCIOCI — t^ CO 


s 


O O CO lo o O O O O O lo — . lo CO CI r~ O O O O O O O O Ci O X ph O p-i O C O CI O C O X lo 
t& (NO ph CI CO Ci pi 00 pH lO TfTjt 


5° ui 


lOTtiONOOOOSOOXLOCOOOOOOOCIOXXOO-OOX OOOLOOOO — t- 
CS H C) O * p» CI CI X CI r-l CI lO ci CI O O "* OS o © lo lo 
O1C0CO p-i CO iH M t- pH cici 

» Cf H 


s 


g 

3 


OXOXLOOXCiiC' r C Ci O p-i CO C CI O 1^ O r. lo O O O O 01 O O 1 - O O O CI O p- o o o 

cs lo r(i lo o ci pt ci co lo x ci -r co pp ci o ci co -r 01 p* o -f ph t © lo tc ox 


§ 

a 


S 
3 


oc lo o o o o lo p-i lo o x lo x x x x o o ci o ci x r- o o x x o o lo lo -r o x r» lo o lo o ph 

01 01 Ci X X CO - - — I- O X 00 O X c - x ouo -c — ■- I- -.c CO r- LO ~ C. CO X 01 01 O CI O CO X r- 

pjip-ico cop-ip-ip-ifcocop-i ci ci ci ci ph co pplOp-. 


0. 

w 


Elmer F. Howard," h 
Arthur F. Upton, 
Arthur E. Sweet, 
H. Allen Halstead, h 
Charles M. Packard, 
Henry N. Frye, 
fulius II. Ford, h 
Carl Engvall, 

Everett A. Cole, h 
Jared S. Adams, h 
D. Milton Howe, h 
Josepli F. Davis, h 
David L. Bodfish,- h 
Frederick A. Upham, h 
Dea. Elisha A. Merrill, h 
Dea. Richard E. Smith, h 

A. W. Felt, 

Miss Corrie Pierce, 

Darius O. Chickering, b 

Miss Mary L. P. Shattuck, 

Edwin Shumway, li 

George K. Wilder, 

Lyman B. Smith, 

George C. Harding, 

Dea. James Jacobs, 

Joseph E. Pierson, 

Rev. James E. Gregg, h 

A. C. Bouteiller, hm 

Edwin L. Atkins, 1. 

Gideon II. Clark, 

Harry W. Burns, 

Mrs. G. A. Fish, 

Rev. Enrico Rivoire, m 

Mrs. Charles T. Torrey, m 

W. F. Wendemuth, 

William Roper, jr.," 

Dea. James E. Rich, 

Dea. Ernest W. Branch, 

George H. Murray, 


i 

s 


E 


Northlield, 

North Reading, 

Norton, 

Norwood, 

Oakham, 

Orange, North, 
,, Central, 
,, Swedish, 

Orleans, 

Otis, 

Oxford, 

Palmer, 1st, 
2d, 
„ Three Riv's, 

Paxton, 

Peabody, South, 
2d, 
West, 

Pelham, 
,, PaekardviUe, 

Pepperell, 

Peru, 

Petersham, 

Phillipston, 

Pittsfield, 1st, 
„ 2d, 
„. South, 
„ Pilgrim M., 
, , French, 

Plainfield, 

Plymouth, Man., 
„ Pilgrimage, 
„ Chiltonville, 
,, Italian, No., 

Plympton, 

Prescott, 

Princeton, 

Provincetown, 

Quincy, Beth., 
„ Wollaston, 



24 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 



II 



= ?■ ,? 5 - '- - '-2 = 



Owooi.ooooQi.'Soia©© 

enfloiijcogioaioooo^ooo 



-:;;:c::;::;^::: 



o co c c ci c — . 



ON05NO WO CO. 



^^/.c-tiriflcon, 



ioo«ioo»ooc:3:;c::-::::MCD:c:fCCKo. 



:I3flSHOHKr.:i«i3CISC:iNCCie«3SriO'-KMKK: 



; cc i-h o x — c-i ; 



INN^ONC^OHriOl 



'HiCIT.I-r 



>eiOHooo«NNoocn*«(ic 



iooHi»niHoi»oon»«i 



3 io o s f i ;i o •? h f . 



:c«c:;«?:ti?:;: 



■ ~ ti ~ r — — re ri r. : - :r :^ - r: « ; x - : 



= r - i- ■ 

ri ri it : 



■? o c x i- r./;-:/;-c-:ri 



I O — i -7 C CI - 






HN00NHM«O*( 



R.C" 









• Q .2 = = ?.= t -; s =- 






2 0,i 

a" § S 1 .5 







1906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



■2.1 



E=5§ 



u 



o o o o c o 



OOOOOCCCCCC COCCCCCCOOCCOC locoqxocooooooo 

Ow cnOJO f 3 3 OiO C3C C T C Cl» C C i~ ;3 = 

53 t-_<Nr-i ci_-t_co_ co o„r-c c oS ci-* H oxS ci 

O ■* h* o" C 10 OS <N C 10 r-." o o" o oo" © CO 



o o © © o o 

o cxcce 
C C — C c c 
» « O 00 *d« t; ia o N' OCR CO 



X. X X = 9 xxxxxxxxxx = ~- CC33COCCCCOCCCC 

SS££- crccccccccccc cccccccccccc- 11 
c c c clo_ c c coc c «o -r c_lo_c c c c x_x .o c c_ ;:i cqoooS 



Nh«!NC o — ci c. c C X CI Lo c c-. c r~ o 



lO CI * rH rH rH LO O 



i (0 C CO 10 c: O) t- 



OOOOQOOCCCCCC ocrccccccccc 
lo c -r ci c c >o c c c c c c r~ c c re c lo o c c lo c c 

r.MMN:s-:i:/:i:.::-[.:o;^/.j::Hi.- 

" - _-_:c «r _r _r e.«j_r_r+- Brf-_r«f 



CCCXC-rXCCCCC 

i.~ >~ - : 1 c co c c c c c c 
:cz ■: : : :i : :. :. - /. o 



x — ci i.- x ccicxmc — ccr— h-coocc-: -f >o lo co co co u: 33 -.3 33 33 3 1 c 33 

c c ~ ci -t ^no-c^-nc lo ■-•CTrt-i-:;z c co lo «o ■.- c . i~ -r c -y. c - 

- - r. ~ ~ ci ■- — 13 y i- ~ — lc .3 13 i- / n 3 ; 3 ; ci — ci c co re ci co — re uo -.3 lo - 



c — co o ci 



COCloCCCClOCC -tCCCI^OrHCCO-HCOCCCCOCC- 3 3 3 3 C 3 : 



icocoor 



CO" LO •* 



O — C Ol-tCCO-tcC-OCOCOC — Ni-iOCOCCt> 



ccr.ee i.O 3~. 33 to t^ o 

¥j L0 CI 

CO rH 


HMH3»KO3t>0h3C3f C033:i33 3/33X3X 

ci ci ci " t^ ci x Tf -? ci ih co to -r — 


030CNKH3M30 
,-1 O I-- rH O >H 
» CI rH 


f N N C 3 :i : 1 3 3. 3 3. 3. - 3 ^ C i.3 3 X t n iS n « N N 3 ;i 
CI -* — CO — O Ci CI CO CI t- 31 CO « O CO C — — LO 
r-i X IM iH i-l rHrH 


lOCOOiOOC 3CtO 

at 


L0 CI C C CI CO C C Ci -t CI O 31 C CO C C C -i i» C L0 — LO 31 C 33 X 
CO" rH CO *-( rH 1-H N n* 


oo oooososooc 

cl « 


OCCCL0L0CCCC0CC — C -< O C O O CI OOt^OOLOCLO 
rH Ci rH i-h rH CI Tjt 


IOOOOCOCCC1C. c 


"L0 — CL0Ct^CI~-CClL0Tt<CCC0L0ClOC0CCL0XCrHCX 

rH X rH 00 N CO .Tj< O rH t- 00 CI TfCiOtH LO X O 01 T 



CI O C rn C C 33 33 CO /. ~ ■: - CI T Ci C 
LO O CO CI T 31 L0 31 CO CO CO L0 Cl CO c 



1 t- c x co lo co r- lo lo ci t 



. • X lo co r- co co -r : 

CI rH CO t^ r-. -H L0 C) LO CO l 



)r--f xcoloo 



*1 



r- = 



if *s"J lll^fligill ■§! iff- 1 ' 



111 I 



n^J5 • w c = _ . ■ • • ^ Psu jdbsri'* << • ^ t, E, 5 a :: • c . e. -r- « < ** s- 
§■= S^ 22~ ci § 5 ? 2? ?! x -3 S > dS^ 5^± V 6 » d S r> a >< U 5 fe 



L'G 



Statist ia 



~ ~ - - ~ •'■ ~. ■" 



~ ~ cc •- -f — z. t- cc o i'-C 5 [~ 



— Churches 



[1906 



1 O 0) iH CO CI O 



iqoomiocswoooocOi 



HONOHQOt 



inonoooHiQcqts: 



1 :i :i 7 ci 1 - l~ 2 :i c c c :i :i o 



SONBONHBOOSHBOI 



irtSS-fKICf^-rSCOOOOOn 



.QCNrtrfTfflOClM 



lOOQOMTjii-l^oOTtlt^TjtOCO 



030hh;o;;:c;:«::-;:i:::t;;m;27d:;:;33mhi3 



i70«cs:i:i;iSTcr;:acxiN^HHio> 



3Mh3S3i50C|«hh»<t|. 



■ NNrtMOOOOOi 



cc:icir:3c-i. 

tH <N Ft CI rt fH 01 



!303«Hf 



: - ^ ■- x x x r. ci x tc ■* ■* o ci -* 



M33C3CH?NMt3C-'3?;l:i 



OCMrr-CCIM.TJ'NiOC' 



iNt><*<ooicot-o*' 



xc«utc:-;3;i3;i! 



OHMOBMi 



SKC.C.tCrti^SN' 
-S> Q — CI CO NHOCOOi 



c.-c.3n:--c X 33 1- CI X -3 I- c c - - X r^ t~ v= ~ : 
1 -f c. h f fi m x t 3 / r. c 1- :i c r. 3 >: ■: c « h i c. 2 : 
• -r ci cc ci ci ~< ci ci ci cc ci -r lc — X hhci — • 






— to -f x -1 1^ — ci o ci re h- o -1 — • 
01 t- C33 o r- r- -r ci — to t- c 1 : 



OH i.C P3 CI CI ■+ tc ( 

33 C. 3 3 3 3 '/. C 3 : 



» 2? ® S £ 



s§llSe ^=i 25.P it! 



Sle^lsS^cjS? =5-6?-=^^ Jogs k-py, =5%j£ 






■Hi 



I ;j~t!-S- 3:.= ^ pi"! y._ ;< r-S-S 3- O £ _. .- ^ - X _ a I ■: 



a rj ri 5 -" - O 



OJ =<S«^< ;;J 






1 lo — 1 co -t co t 
) to 33 CO 01 r» r 
■ XXX x x x x t- x x xi- x r- r- - x x X X X x x x x x x x x 1- x r^ x r- w r- 1 



— -_3 10 to 1- 1- x ~ ■ 



1 ci co -r — : 






jBJ2 ! 

'/. 7. 'J 



o >, rtODQ«iSSHfe(Hf5lP-|0Q(afa 

o w iu.2 

.3-5 -■£"?: six 



-s 



3 3 
X 7. 



si -ill: S^ -e. 

■■=:^ • « m.3 _g .§ J a 

|o 3 2 3~i -- 5 

X X CO CQ 02 03 X X 3D 



1906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditure.' 



27 



i 


1* 


Qoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooeooo 

m OOOOO O O © O ■--. O O © 3 © s 
0_0_iO_Cl_0_ X lo -rCChCf] CI — _ — 
iow~oo~-*"x' - T~ cf -T lo" ih" 


^5 


ooooooooooooooooooortoooooooooooooooocooo 

o o o.©oo©c©co © oi :/.::i::: 
O O 10 OO lOHOttu) © XO r~ co © © — ..- co 
2 rt ~ W" C-fcf rtLoT cf •-(" i-To cf r-"co" ■*«" 
6# rt rt i-l rl 


$13,000 

3,800 

0,000 
60,000 
20,000 
17,000 
50,000 
45,000 
25,000 
12,000 
13,000 
*4,000 
25,000 
28,000 
21,000 

4,500 

35,000 

*200000 

*30,000 

* 180000 

* 1501 100 

12,000 

42,000 

*9,000 

*6,000 

*4,000 

*22,000 

*9,000 

7,300 
*1 1,500 

5,800 
13,000 

5,000 

*25,000 

15,000 

5,500 
13,SOO 
11,843 
10,500 
1S.000 


Ch. 

l-.rec. 

1766 
'ST 
'64 
'68 
'83 
76 
'89 
'91 
'95 

1 7SS 
'57 
'35 
'85 
'94 

'24 
'63 
'19 
'34 
'74 
'73 
'48 
'S2 

'.ss 

'SI 
'8-1 
'S9 
'82 

'99 
'40 
'22 
'26 

'■10 

17S7 
'91 
'36 
'21 1 
'■16 


Salary, 

»1,000 

400 

600 

2,000 

2,500 

pi, 958 

2,500 

2,200 

1,200 

800 

000 

350 

1,100 

pi. 2U() 

1 ,300 

700 

1,800 

5,000 

1,200 

5,000 

3,200 

1,000 

3,5(10 

u700 

al.OOO 

a!)75 

1 ,700 

al.OOO 

1,600 
700 

1,200 
477 

1,600 

1,200 
800 

1,000 
950 
892 

1.300 




$3,400 

473 

744 

6,747 

5,535 

4,205 

4,987 

7,715 

4,094 

1,400 

1,066 

443 

2,250 

2, 60S 

3,087 

950 

4,648 

1 1 ,500 
2,490 

10,515 
5,813 
4,268 

11,731 
335 
1 ,058 
1 ,392 
7,283 
1,000 

4^122 

1 ,036 

2,757 

3,207 
7,761 

1,000 
1,891 

1 ,878 
1 ,5S. r , 

3,212 


a 
N 


H 


$422 

77 

48 

658 

967 

307 

282 

1,107 

227 

270 

GO 

8 

294 

710 

1,170 

78 

2,535 

10,069 

647 

6,07.8 

1,539 

102 

2,192 

274 
331 

120 
910 
90 
49S 

156 
5T5 

1 32 
248 
001 

183 

747 


O 


inOwHoooi9Miooioo«3SO'*c:-fo-tstf;i;f:^c.:;i>MOKi , Tt:i-':-:tcc 

© KNONCICC1C1 SHhHMr-:r.-n-i5 lo — © O CI Ci i-0 01 CO 3© 
«© LOCI X CI XOOIOCO — _ CI r- CI" —CO 


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1- io lo ci co — ■* — — ci co •# r- oi — ci oi lo — co — oi 01 ci co 


o, 


Alfred H. Knight, 

Nathan J. Hunting, h 

Sermon N. Knox, h 

C. Frank Liscomb, h 

Benjamin S. Wiley," h 

Thomas C. Wallace, 

George A. Kimball, 

J. Harvey White, 

Lex C. Barbrick, h 

Edward K. Parsons, h 

Henry A. McMaster, 

lames F. Chickering, 

Alva L. Hyde, h 

Nathaniel E. Preston, h 

F. E. Whittemore, h 

Mrs. Herbert L. Miller, 

Frank W. Wilson, h 

Rev. Louis F. Giroux, 

George It. Booth, h 

Edward A. Applcton, 

J. Everett Ilaynes, 

James Greenaway, 

Elisha IT. Cutler, li 

Rev. Charles L. Charron, 

Leroy Nichols, 

F. IT. Adkins, h 

Rev. John L. Kilbon, 

I'red Anderson, 

E. Bernard llaskins, 

Ur. C. S. Hurlbut, h 

Rev. Charles B. Tolenian, 

Clarence II. Perry, 

Frank A. Palmer, 

Frank E. Alden, li 

Miss Fannv M. Burnhum, 

John F. Hebard, 1 " 

Dea. Finm-is V. Walker, 

Charles I. Gunn, 

Dexter A. Brighum, 

Harold C. Childs, h 


= 


8 

E 


.Shrewsbury, 
Shutesbury, 
Somerset, 
Somerville, 1st, 

,, Broadway, 

„ West, 

„ Prospect Hill, 

„ Winter Hill, 

,, Highland, 
Southampton, 
Southboro, 

„ SouthviUe, 
Southbridge, 
South Hadley, 

Falls, 
Southwick, 
Spencer, 
Springfield, 1st, 

„ Olivet, 

„ South, 

,, North, 

,, Indian Orch., 

,, Hope, 

,, French, 

,, Eastern av., 

„ Emmanuel, 

,, Park, 

„ Swedish, 

„ St. John's, 

„ Faith, 
Sterling, 
Slockbridge, 

,, Interlaken, 
Stoneham, 
Stoughton, 
St urbridge, 
Sudbury, South, 
Sunderland, 
Sutton, 
Swampscott, 



28 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 





6 


siooooooaNSQMiHao'i'Ca o m « o o o o oooot^Ornoxoocia 

o t- O —. i-O — C — CI r. co c 1 -r c c c io x ci to lo y. — -r ro r- C lo — -r ci vD -c x -. r. — i-o 
N« m -« -h ci — :o— co c«^« cjci-i ^n Hfu: • 


ti 


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:ooii7Crccit;c:TC^cccv:cir-ccccio/.i.':i.':co;2oc:«;r. 


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O««O*O»H g oMOOtH«HOOO»H«OOe.NeOOO00«V«j i 




7. 


H 


-h os t -tf to ci — — c> -^ o ci c — ~ co ci -r -r x -r -^ ci co c o — c x t^ tec X ci -i co co .-i o -r -r — 


O 


OOHOOrtCHWHOOOl — SOhOh CCCOCCCCCCCCCCCOrHCCl > 


►4 


H-jnncir--,cocioo;MxoN<'c: = riHsoi'«i.':opjoioooHoooK-ic „ 


5 


o c x « - ; c ; i - o ci c ci c :i c •? ; x - c i.: c: o h c o o h h ti ci o x x h f i ; ci _- 


s 


-' 


DCOH^rtrtMOONClOOvNNXCHT:; ; X.-CCt-COOQnhHCHOM.-jCCOC _ 


o -^ ci -!■ t- c -t — « c -r co t co t - c c . ;-i^Tf cciMO-3-HCNtoBcqo* 

—I — CI CI — _ CI ^ 


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ONOOtrtCCrTr.MOOOCTCCM-MOCTCCI-CcaOrtl'CIOOOCOClCfN 


s 


< 


0> X r- — ih i-o r- x co lo c lo — - t- ci m lo — c ia « lo X r- r- O X X -f o> c e- t- x -i ci c C o 

lO 1.0 CI CO — CI CI -h CO iH i-O CO C T t- OC^rtClcCHOH rt N cc cc c c 


>E 3 


lOMiOOOMOHMK)^ in -\ C C i-O -t -r SO tOPNOOOOOtOOCSCTlCOSOOb-OeOOOr-irfi-' 

coot-i-ocic — c-rci-ri ^ ci co — - n -c i- -c i-o LO io — co io c x c — co co x o c t- o k 
coco CI i hh ci r— lo -r CI CO -hcoci— CO .-htlOc 


£ 




pr 


2S^S^^ = co2SS x = ^LoSp^Sci = :I ^S^5^5pSS2?^co?^5 




-- 
U 




i 


O 


Abram L. Bean, p. '92 
Linooln B. Goodrich, p. o. '93 
Charles II. Talmage, /). c. '82 
Henry E. Bray, p. '89 
(icorgc 11. Johnson, />. '77 
Eugene G. Smith, p. '71 
Richard Peters, p. '00 

Henry A. Coolidge, p. '92 
William G. Poor, p. '85 

George O. Thompson, p. '89 
(John C. Burke, Metk.] '96 
[FredF. Wolfe, Math.] 
Finest W. lOldridge, 71. '93 
Alexander Wiswall, p. 70 

Hugh MacCallum, p. c. '97 

Peter Lindstrom, p. '98 

lOdward L. Chute, p. '80 

Christian Groezinger, p. '01 

John Graham, p. '90 

Lawrence Perry, p. '94 
Andrew Campbell, p. '96 
William W. Sleeper, p. c. '82 
Parris T. Farwell, p. c. '83 
George J. Newton, p. '97 

Arthur L. Truesdale, p. '05 
Walter S. Eaton, p. '91 
John J. Walker, p. c. '94 
John E. Dodge, p. '83 
J. Howard Gaylord, p. c. '99 
John II. Lockwood, p. c. '71 
William C. Gordon, p. c. '89 
Palmer. Turners Pal 


1 


1 

53 


Mrs. Whitman Chace, jr., 
Dea. Chester E. Walker, 
Frederick C. Burbank, 
Dea. C. W. King, 
Prank R. Knox, 
Moses A. Winch, 
Dea. 11. L. Sheperdson, 
Mrs. Grace 10. Locke, 
Mrs. Theresa L. Hale, 
J. Porter Gould, 
Mrs. A. C. Josselyn, 
Dea. Daniel E. Paine, 
Mrs. Zona B. Small, 
Mrs. Sarah C. Swallow, 
Miss Olive M. Johnson, 

Miss 11. Mabel Gunn, 
Una. John W. While, 
Samuel 10. Bent ley, 

Miss Sarah 10. Pettee, 

George W. Kimball, 

David Anderson, 

Miss M. R. Howard, 

Henry K. Hyde, 

Miss Harriet 10. Smith, 

Eugene F. Wood, 

Mrs. Christine 10. Delay, 

Edwin Stockin, 

Miss Margaret E.Wheeler, 

Miss Emma S. Hawkinson, 

Rev. Lewis AV. Hicks, 

Henry P. Smith, 

Mrs. S. S. Wiley, 

Isaac R. Paine, 

Mrs. Effie L. Bowen, 

Benjamin H. Conant, 

William A. Sanford, 

Dea. E. Beaman Rice, 

Edwin Wilbur, 

Rev. John H. Lockwood, 

Henry D. Curtiss, 

Threo Rivera, ae 




6 

•J 


637 
821 

s:i7 

853 
868 

S32 
874 

735 
707 
663 
73 1 
711 

868 
735 
73(1 
6 II 
826 
877 
821 ) 

802 

751 

826 
73! 1 
743 
S29 
855 
828 
83S 

798 

847 
723 
833 
774 
644 
72! 
796 
717 
679 
856 
line 


Taunton, West, 

,, Trinitarian, 
,, Winslow, 

East, 1 
Union, 
Templeton, 

,, Baldwinville, 
Tewksbury, 
Tolland, 
Topsfield, 
Townsend, 
Truro, 

„ Union, North, 
Tyngsboro, 
Upton, 
Uxbridga. 
Wakefield, 
Walpole, 

East, 
Waltham, 

Swedish, 
Ware, 1st, 

„ East, 
Wareham, 
Warren, 1st, 
Warwick, 
Watertown, 
Wayland, 
Webster, 
WeUesley, 

Hills, ] 
Wellfleet, 

„ 2d, South, 
Wendell, 
Wenham, 
Westboro. 
West Boylston, 
West Brookfield, 1 
Westfield, 1st, 1 
2d, 



1906] 



Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



2'.) 



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£ £ -££^£ £p^£ £ £ ££*£;£ *£*££: tS ^^^ 



:;o 



Statistics — Churches 



[1906 



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Sunday Schools, Benevolence and Home Expenditi 



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ci oc ifl ts -r .-0 — ci -j< co co si 'O t~- to r- ci 

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Statistics — Churches 



[1906 ,J 



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1906] 



Sunday Scliools, Benevolence and Home Expenditures 



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[1906 



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2 O 



Statistics 



[190O 



III. SUNDAY-SCHOOL AND YOUNG 
PEOPLE'S SOCIETY STATISTICS 





Sunday 
Schools 


Families 

Congre- 
gation 


Young People's 
Societies 


CoNFEREX'CES 


No. 


Members 




0,647 
1,604 
3,253 
1,713 
2,800 
4,541 
8,405 
3,5S8 

10,311 
2,500 
2,224 
2,147 
3,697 
3,481 
9,696 
2,399 ' 
1,206 
9,389 

11,101 
7,332 
4,258 
7,904 
8,192 
2,377 
2,671 
75 
132 


5.538 
1,611 

2,S29 
1,555 
2,395 
4,752 
6,680 
3.04S 
8,777 
2,221 
1,625 
1,958 
3,055 
3,013 
7,259 
2,178 
1,433 
7,243 
7,552 
5,279 
3.322 
5,929 
6,848 
1,850 
2,086 
60 
285 


24 
15 
14 
15 
18 
22 
33 
27 
36 
13 
12 
10 
15 
22 
33 
14 
8 
2S 

IS 
21 

29 
16 
15 


1,857 


















1,179 




1,609 




1,C91 




2,257 




£09 




515 




591 




807 




1,047 


Norfolk 


2,352 


Old Colonv 


718 




294 


Suffolk, Xorth ... 


2,011 




2,328 


West . . 


1,526 




1,000 




1,912 




1,912 




70S 




75S 




13 




43 








123,643 
121,162 
*2,4S1 


100,371 

100,120 

*251 


507 

508 

tl 


30,191 




31,079 






* Gain. t Loss 


t8S8 



1906] 



Summary of Annual Changes 



:;? 



IV. SUMMARY OF CHANGES DURING 
• • THE YEARS MENTIONED 



ion.-, 

1904 

l'jo:? 
1002 
1901 
1000 

ISO 
189S 

1S07 



18)0 
1SS0 
1888 
1887 

isso 
l sso 
lsst 
1S8.0 
1882 
1881 
isso 
1879 
1878 
1877 
1876 
1875 
1874 
187:; 
1872 
1871 
1870 
1869 
1 80s 
1807 



583 
1,738 
1.041 

705 
1,950 
1,581 

629 

LO'.io 
1,100 
2.101 
1,200 
1,425 
1,262 
3.070 



3,99.-) 

2,010 
787 



531 

1,002 
2,879 



33 34 

21 oo oo 

10 4 3 09 
9 
10 
17 
17 



200 10 

413 1 



1,914 

1,849 

934 

2.4 10 
1,048 

., :!'-'- 
i.s"io 

2,941 



401 
2.020 
0.710 

920 



10,999 
349 



17.S2S 
10,9110 
101,01 1 



17,2110 
10.902 
2(1,119 



100.919 45 
23,341 82 
137,601 71 



S.s.9.-,.-, 
10 000 
99,808 



28,871 
4,394 



70.297 
10.274 
10.929 



Note. — The " year "' means what changes were comprised in the twelve months 
preceding January 1 of the year mentioned. The table was begun in 1866. all preceding 
years now given being compiled from pa^t Minutes, — the number of churches in some 
years varying from the Minutes as they uere to what they should have been. 

The changes in list of churches, ordinations, installations, etc., for the past year, con- 
densed in the above table, are given in detail in their proper place. 



* Prior to 1876 " acting pastors ' 



included in " others " in columns of deaths of 



3S 



Statistics 



[1906 



a° 


611,585 
62 1,935 
721,773 
673,945 
(Kill. 03!) 
558,125 

658,551 
696,261 
631,246 
675. 8S4 
852,055 
657,548 
675,285 
658,079 
611,177 
678.050 
707,821 
507,307 
601,702 
500,782 
477,440 
319,830 
391,716 
346,485 
325,484 
309,314 
384,611 
400,886 


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k 3.S0H 



C „ J2 



a 2 — °" 



THE CONFERENCES OF THE CHURCHES 



1. ANDOVER. — Organized June 8, 1859. 
Andover, South, Lawrence, South, Lowell, High St., 

West, " Riverside, " French, 

Free, « Trinity, " Highland, 

Ballardvale, " United. " Swedish, 

" Seminary, Lowell, Pawtucket, " Norwegian, 

Chelmsford, 2d, North, " First, Methuen, 

Central, " First Trinitarian, North Andover, 

Dracut, First, " Eliot, Tewksbury, 

" Central, " John St., Tyngsboro. 

Lawrence, Lawrence St., " Kirk St., 

Albert W. Burxh.ui, Lowell, secretary and treasurer. 
Rev. Owen* H. Gates, Andover, statistical secretary. 
Conference meets on the last Tuesdays in April and October. 

2. BARNSTABLE. — Organized October 2S, 1S28. 

Barnstable, West, Falmouth, East, Provincetown, 

Centreville, " North, Sandwich, 

" Hyannis, " Waquoit, Truro, First, 

" Cotuit, " Woods Hole, " Christ'n U., North, 

Chatham. Harwich, Wellfleet, First, 

Dennis, South, " Port, " South, 

Union, Nantucket, Yarmouth, First, 

Falmouth, First, Orleans, " West. 

Rev. Charles S. Bates, West Barnstable, scribe and treasurer. 
Conference meets on the second Tuesdays in May and November. 

. 3. BERKSHIRE NORTH. — Organized December 3, 1867. 

Adams, Peru, Williamstown, College, 

Becket, North, Pittsfield, First, " South, 

Dalton, " Second, " White Oaks, 

Hinsdale, . " South, Windsor, 

Lanesboro, " Pilgrim Mem'I, (Canaan, N. Y.), 

Middlefield, Richmond, (New Lebanon, N. Y.). 

North Adams, Williamstown, First, 

Deacon George French, North Adams, secretary and treasurer. 
Annual meeting on the second Wednesday in November; semi-annual on 
the second Wednesday in May. 

4. BERKSHIRE SOUTH. — Organized August 29, 1860. 

Becket, Centre, Mount Washington, Sandisfield, New Boston, 

Egremont, South, New Marlboro, First, Sheffield, 

Great Barring-ton, First, " " Southfield, Stockbridge, First. 

" " Housatonic, " " Mill River, " Interlaken, 

Lee, Otis, West Stockbr'ge, Centre, 

Lenox, Sandisfield, First, " " Village. 

Monterey, 

Theron W. Crissey, Great Barrington, scribe and treasurer. 

Rev. Walter W. Curtis, West Stockbridge, statistical secretary. 

Annual meeting usually in October; semi-annual meeting in May. 
39 



40 



Statistics 



[1900 



5. BROOKFIELD. — Organized June 13, 1821. 

Barre, Hardwick, Gilbertville, Sturbridge, 

Brimfield, Holland, Ware, First, 

Brookfield, New Braintree, " East, 

Charlton, North Brookfield, First, Warren, 

Dana, Oakham, West Brookfield. 

Dudley, Southbridge, 

Hardwick, First, Spencer, 

Rev. Edward L. Chute, Ware, scribe and treasurer. 

Annual meeting, first Tuesday in May, two days; semi-annual, third Tuesday 
in September, one day. 



Amesbury, First, 
" Union, 

Boxford, West, 

Georgetown, First, 

Memorial 

Groveland, 

Haverhill, Bradford, 
West. 
" Fourth, 

" Centre, 



6. ESSEX NORTH. — Organized April 30, 1S2S. 

Haverhill, North, Newbury, First 

Byfield 



North, 
" Riverside, 

" Union, Newburyport, North, 

" St. John's. French, " Prospect St. 

Ward Hill, " Belleville, 

Zion, " Whifefield, 

Ipswich, First, Rowley, 

" Linebrook, West Newbury, First, 

Merrimac, " " Second. 



Rev. Charles S. Holtox. Newburyport, scribe. 

Rev. Herbert E. Lombard, R. F. D. Rowley, statistical secretary and 



Conference meets on the second Wednesdays in May and October. 



7. ESSEX SOUTH. — Organized May 8, 1S27. 



Beverly, Second, 
Dane St., 
" Washington St 
Boxford, 
Danvers, First, Centre, 

Maple St., 
Essex, 
Gloucester, West, 

Trinity, 
" Lanesville, 

" Magnolia, 

" Bethany, 



Ipswich, South, 
Lynn, First, 

Central, 
" Chestnut St., 

North, 
" Scandinavian, 
Lynnfield, Centre, 
" Second, 

Manchester, 
Marblehead, 
Middleton, 
Nahant, 

Peabody, South, 
Rev. T. Frank Waters, Ipswich, scribe and treasurer. 
Rev. Arthur J. Covell, Lynn, statistical scribe. 

Conference meets on the second Wednesdays in May and October. 



Pcabodv, Second, 

" ' West, 
Rockport, First, 

" Pigeon Cove, 

Su-ed., P. Cove, 
Salem, Tabernacle, 
" • South, 

Crombie St., 
Saugus, First, 

Cliftondale, 
Swampscott, 
Topsfield, 
Wen ham. 



8. FRANKLIN. — Organized October 10, 1S43. 



Ashfield, 
Bernardston, 
Buckland, 
Charlemont, First, 
" East, 



Colerain, 
Conwav, 
Deerfie'ld, South, 

" Orthodox, 

Erving, 



Gill, 

Greenfield, First, 

" Second, 

Hawley, First, 

" Second, West, 



1906] The Conferences of the Churches 41 

8. FRANKLIN (Continued). 

Heath, Northfield, East, Shutesbury, 

Leverett, Moores Cor., Orange, Central, Sunderland, 

Montague, First, " Swedish, Warwick, 

Millers Falls, Shelburne, First, Wendell, 

Turners Falls, " Falls, Whately. 

Rev. Edward P. Butler, Sunderland, scribe and treasurer. 
Conference meets in the last weeks of April and September. 

9. HAMPDEN. — Organized December 4, 1850. 

Agawam, Feeding Hills, Holyoke, French, Springfield, Hope, 

" Second, Huntington, Second, " French, 

Blandford, First, Longmeadow, " Eastern Av., 

" Second, North, Ludiow, Centre, " Emmanuel, 

Chester, First, " Union, " Park, 

" Second, Monson, " Swedish, 

Chicopee, First, Palmer, Thorndike, " St. John's, 

Second, Falls, " Second, " Faith, 

Third, " Three Rivers, Tolland, 

East Longmeadow, South Hadley Falls, Westfield, First, 

Granville, First, Centre, Southwick, " Second, 

West, Springfield, First, West Springfield, First, 

Hampden, " Olivet, " " Mittineague, 

Holyoke, First, " South, " " Park St., 

" Second, " North, Wilbraham, Centre, 

" Indian Or'd, " North. 

Rev. Henry L. Bailey, Longmeadow, scribe. 
William F. Emerson, Longmeadow, treasurer. 

Conference meets on the last Tuesday in September; semi-annual meeting 
in April or May. 

10. HAMPSHIRE. — Organized February, 1865. 

Chesterfield, Hatfield. Southampton, 

Cummington, Huntington, 1st, Norw'ch,Westhampton, 

West, Northampton, First, Williamsburg, 

Easthampton, First, " Edwards, " Haydenville, 

" Payson, " Florence, Worthington. 

Goshen, . Plainfield, 

Rev. John Pierpont, Williamsburg, scribe and treasurer. 

Rev. Robert H. Life, Haydenville, statistical secretary. 

Conference meets in the spring and fall at the call of the executive committee. 

11. HAMPSHIRE EAST. — Organized December 13, 1860. 

Amherst, First, Enfield, Leverett, 

" Second, Granby, Pelham, First, 

" College, Greenwich, " Pack'dville, Enfield, 

North, Hadley, First, Prescott, 

" South, " Second, North, South Hadley. 

Belchertown, 

M. B. Kingman, Amherst, registrar and treasurer. 
Rev. John F. Gleason, South Amherst, statistical secretary. 
Semi-annual meeting on the last Tuesday in April; annual meeting on the 
third Tuesday in October. 



■r* 



42 Statistics [1906 

12. MENDOX. — Organized April 12, ISoS. 

Foxboro, Medway, Second, West, Norfolk, 

Franklin, " Village, Walpole, 

Mansfield, Milford, Wrentham. 

Medfield, Millis, 

Rev. William Macnair, Mansfield, scribe and treasvrer. 

Conference meets on the third Wednesdays in April and October. 



13. MIDDLESEX SOUTH. — Organized August 20, 1S28. 

Ashland, Hudson, Northboro, 

Dover, Lincoln, Sherborn, 

Framingham, Plymouth, Marlboro, Union, Southboro, 

" Saxonville, " Hope, " Southville, 

" South, Maynard, Sudbury, South, 

Holliston, Natick, First, Wayland, 

Hopkinton, " South, Wellesley. 

Rev. Albert D. Smith, Northboro, scribe and treasurer. 
Conference meets on the third Tuesdays in April and October. 



14. MIDDLESEX UNION. — Organized May S, 1853. 

Acton, First, Fitchburg, Rollstone, Leominster, Centre, 
South, " German, " North, 

Ashby, " Swedish, Littleton, 

Ayer, " Finnish, Lunenburg, 

Roxboro, West Acton, Groton, First, Pepperell, 

Concord, *' West, Shirley, 

Dunstable, Harvard, Townsend, 

Fitchburg, Calvinist, Lancaster, Westford. 

Rev. Albert F. Newton, North Leominster, scribe and treasurer. 
Annual meeting third Wednesday in October; spring meeting in April. 



15. NORFOLK. — Organized June 14, 1827. 

Abington, First. Cohasset, Beechwood, Quincy, Finnish, 

" North, East Bridgewater, Randolph, 

Braintree, First, Easton, Centre, Rockland, 

" South, " Swedish, North, Sharon, 

Bridgewater, Hingham, First, Stoughton, 

" Scotland, " Beth'y, Nan't, Weymouth, First, Hghts., 

Brockton, First, Holbrook, " Old South, South, 

" South, Ca'p'lo, Milton, " & Braintree, E. B., 

" Porter, " East, " Union, South, 

" Waldo, Quincy, Bethany, " Pilgrim, North, 

Wendell Av., " Washington St., " East, 

" Lincoln, " Swedish, Whitman. 

Cohasset, Evangelical, 

Rev. Frank B. McAllister, Cohasset, scribe. 

Rev. De Mont Goodyear, Abington, statistical scribe. 

Heman Howard, South Easton, treasurer. 

Conference meets on the first Tuesday in May, and on the last Tuesday in 
September. 



1906] The Conferences of the Churches 43 

16. OLD COLONY. — Organized September 23, 1856. 

Dartmouth, South, Middleboro, Central, Roch'r, East.W.Wareham, 

Edgartown, New Bedford, Acushnet, Wareham, 
Fairhaven, " " North, Westport, 

Marion, " " Trinitar'n, West Tisbury. 

Mattapoisett. Rochester, First, 
Middleboro, First, " North, 

Rev. Harry L. Brickett, Marion, scribe and treasurer. 

Conference meets for a two days' session on the third Tuesday in April and 
the last Tuesday in October. 

17. PILGRIM. — Organized April 27, 1830. 
Carver, North, Hanson, Plymouth, Pilgrimage, 

Duxbury, Kingston, " Chiitonville, 

Halifax, Marshfield, First, " Ital., North, 

Hanover, First, West, " Hills, Plympton, 

" Second, Plymouth, Manomet, Scituate. 

Rev. Burton A. Lucas, Marshfield, scribe, treasurer and statistical secre- 
tary. 

Conference meets on the first Tuesdays in May and October. 

IS. SUFFOLK NORTH. — Organized May 23, 1861. 

Arlington, First, Cambridge, Pilgrim, Revere, First, 

" Heights, " Wood Mem'l, " Beachmont, 

Boston, First, Charleston, " Hope, Somerville, First, 

" Winthrop, " " Swedish, " Broadway, 

Maverick, East, Chelsea, First, " West, 

" Mount Vernon, " Central, " Prospect Hill, 

" Seamen's, Everett, First, " Winter Hill, 

Baker, East, " Courtland St., " Highlands, 

Cambridge, First, " Mystic Side, Winthrop, Union. 
First Evang'l, " Swedish, 
" North Av., 

Phineas Hubbard, Cambridge, scribe and treasurer. 
William H. Hilling, Somerville, statistical scribe. 

Conference meets on the second Wednesdays in April and in October. 

19. SUFFOLK SOUTH. — Organized May 13, 1S61. 

Boston, 2d, Dorchester, Boston, Boylston, J. Plain, Dedham, 

" Union, " Immanuel, R'xb'y, Hyde Park, First, 

" Phillips, S. B., '' Trinity. Nepon't, " " Clar'don Hills, 

" Village, Dorch., " Pilgrim, Dorch., Norwood, 

" Eliot, Roxbury, " Highland, R'xb'y, Quincy, Wollaston, 

" Central, Dorch^ " Walnut Av., " " Atlantic, 

" Roslindale, " Olivet, " Park & Downs, 

" St. Mark, " Harvard, Dorch., East Walpole, 

" West Roxbury, " Romsey, " Westwood. Islington. 

" Central, J. Plain, Canton, 

Rev. Edward A. Chase, Wollaston, recording secretary. 

E. S. Hathaway, Hyde Park, treasurer. 

Rev. Herbert A. Barker, Jamaica Plain, statistical secretary. 

Conference meets on the third Wednesdays in April and October. 



44 



Statistics 



[1906 



20. SUFFOLK WEST. — Organized November 17, 1S73. 



Belmont, Waverley, 
Plymouth, 
Boston, Old South, 
Park St., 
Berk aey Tempi 
" Brighton, 
" Central, 
" Shawmut, 
" Swedish, 
" Norwegian, 
. Rev. Henry E. Oxnabd, Newton, scribe. 
Rev. Andrew H. Muxnix, Brighton, recording and statistical secretary. 
Mr. Joseph W. Peabody, 749 Tremont Building, Boston, treasurer. 

Conference meets on the second Wednesdays in April and October. 



Boston, Allston, 
" Faneuil, 
" French, 
Brookline, Harvard, 
;, " Ley den, 

Needham, 

Newton, First, Center, 
" Second, West, 
Eliot, 
Auburadale, 



Newton, North, 

" Newtonville, 
" Highlands, 

Waltham, First, 

Swedish, 

Watertown, Phillips, 

Wellesley Hills, 

Weston. 



21. TAUNTON. — Organized October 2, 1849. 



Attleboro, Second, 

Berkley, 

Dighton, 

Fall River, First, 

" " Central, 

" " Fowler, 

" " French, 

" " Broadway 

Rev. James E. Enman 



Freetown, Assonet, 
Lakeville, 
Middleboro, North, 
North Attloboro, Oldt'n, 
Falls, 
" " Trinity, 

Norton, 
Raynham, First, 

Fall River, scribe. 



Raynham, North, 

Rehoboth, 

Somerset, 

Taunton, West, 

" Trinitarian, 

" Winslow, 

East, 
" Union. 



Thomas Chew, Box 460, Fall River, treasurer. 

Conference meets on the last Wednesdays in May and October. 



Bedford, 

Billerica, 

Burlington, 

Carlisle, 

Lexington, Hancock, 

Maiden, First, 

" Maplewood, 

" Linden, 



Organized September 5, 1S48. 

Stoneham, 
Wakefield, 
Wilmington, 



Maiden, Scandinavian 
Medford, Mystic, 
West, 

" UnioD, 

Melrose, First, 

" Highlands, 

North Reading, 
Reading, 



Winchester, 
Woburn, First, 
" North, 



Scandinavian, 
Montvale. 



Rev. David C. Torrey, Bedford, scribe and treasurer. 

Conference meets on any Tuesday in April and October, generally the last. 



23. WORCESTER CENTRAL. 



Auburn, 
Berlin, 
Boylston, 
Clinton, First, 

" German, 
Holden, 
Leicester, 
Oxford, 



Paxton, 
Princeton, 
Rutland, 
Shrewsbury, 
Sterling, 
West Boylston, 
Worcester, First, 
Central 



Organized April 28, 1852. 

Worcester, Union, 

Memorial, 



Plymouth, 

Piedmont, 

Swedish, 1st, 

Pilgrim, 

Park, 

Covenant, 



1906] The Conferences of the Churches 45 

23. WORCESTER CENTRAL (Continued). 

Worcester, Hope, Worcester, Armenian, Worcester, Swedish, 2d, 

" Lake View, " Immanuel, " Adams Sq. 

" Bethany, 

Rev. Albert G. Todd, 37 Stafford St., Worcester, scribe and treasurer. 
Rev. Thomas E. Babb, Holden, statistical secretary. 

Conference meets on the Tuesday following the second Monday in May and 
on the Tuesday following the third Monday in October. 

24. WORCESTER NORTH.— Organized November 24, 1827. 

Ashburnham, First, New Salem, North, Templeton, Trinitarian, 

" South, Orange, North, " Baldwinsville, 

Athol, Petersham, Westminster, 

Gardner, Phillipston, Winchendon, First, 

Hubbardston, Royalston, First, " North. 

New Salem, " South, 

Rev. Gustavus W. Jones, Winchendon, scribe and treasurer. 
Conference meets in October and May. 



25. WORCESTER SOUTH. — Organized June 17, 1828. 

Blackstone, First, Millbury, First, Upton, 

" Scand., Millville, " Second, Uxbridge, 

Douglas, First, Northbridge, Center, Webster, 

" East, " Whitinsville, Westboro. 

Grafton, First, " Rockdale, 

" Union, Sutton, 

Rev. John R. Thurston, Whitinsville, scribe. 
Amos Armsbt, Millbury, treasurer. 

Conference meets on the fourth Thursdays in April and October. 



MINISTERIAL STANDING IN ASSOCIATIONS AND 
CONFERENCES.* 



1. Andover, Organized July 5, 1763. 



Members. 
Ernest L. Baker, 
Ernest C. Bartlett, 
E. Victor Bigelow, 
John J. Blair, 
Park A. Bradford, 
Charles C. Carpenter, 
Clark Carter, 
J. Harold Dale, 
Ernest C. Davis, 
Charles O. Day, 
George R. Dickinson, 
Sarah A. Dixon, 
Robert W. Dunbar, 
Albert F. Earnshaw, 
Augustus H. Fuller, 
Owen H. Cates, 
Ralph Gillam, 
John M. Greene, 
Edward Y. Hincks, 
Dorr A. Hudson, 
Francis H. Johnson, 
John L. Keedy, 
George F. Kenngott, 
David Kilburn, 
Herbert G. Mank, 
George E. Martin, 
L. K. Mavromates, 
John A. McKnight, 
Charles L. Merriam, 
Selah Merrill, 
William J. Minchin, 
Charles L. Mitchell, 
Charles H. Oliphant, 
Frederick H. Page, 
J. Edgar Park, 
Edward W. Pride, 
William H. Ryder, 
Frank R. Shipman, 
Edwin R. Smith, 
John Phelps Taylor, 
Charles C. Torrey, 
Charles C. Torrey, 
George M. Ward, 
T. Clavton Welles, 
Charles H. Willcox, 
Frederick A. Wilson, 
William E. Wolcott, 
Frank E. Woodruff, 
J. Herbert Yeoman, 



Date of Date of 

Ordination. Membership 

'94, Sept. 18. '95, Feb. 26. A*. TFeare, N. H 

'96, Mar. 12. '96, Dec. 8. Philadelphia. 

'91, Sept. 24. '01, Sept. 24. Lowell. 

'74, Oct. 19. '85, April 7. Springfield. 

'79, July 30. '94, Sept. 25. Danby, Vt. 

'60. May 9. '91, May 20. Andover. 

'6S, Feb. 13. 73, June 3. Andover. 

'03, Oct. 7. '04, Oct. 4. Billerica. 

'94, Dec. 5. '05, May 22. Lawrence. 

'77, Dec. 19. '03, Sept. 22. Andover. 

'95, Oct. 9. '96, Sept. 29. Zanesville, O. 

'97, June 16. '97, Dec. 7. Lowell. 

'99, Feb. 8. '99, Feb. 28. Haverhill. 

'98, Oct. 24. '04, Dec. 6. Chelmsford. 

'78, Oct. 17. '05, Dec. 5. Ballardvale. 

'91, Sept. 1. '03, May 16. Andover. 

'95, Jan. 30. '03, Mav 16. Melrose. 

'57, Oct. 20. '71, June 2S. Lowell. 

'70, Oct. 18. '85, Dec. 15. Andover. 

'91, Sept. 10. '04, Oct. 4. X. Chelmsford. 

'61, Oct. 15. '83, June 5. Andover. 

'94, Aug. 2S. '05, Sept. 26. North Andover. 

'S9, Oct. 8. '92, Dec. 6. Lowell. 

'84, April 20. '90. Sept. 23. Allegheny, Pa. 

'S9, Jan. 15. '98, Dec. 6. Lawrence. 

'79, July 9. '02, Sept. 23. Lowell. 

'03, June 12, '03, Sept. 22. Chicago, III. 

'93, Aug. 15. '02, Feb. 25. Dracut. 

'82, Sept. 13. '92, June 7. Berry, N. H. 

'64, Nov. 1. '74, Oct. 20. Jerusalem 



'96, June 10. 
'71, June 28. 
'76, July 12. 
'93, Nov. 23. 
'03, May 27 



'04, Dee. 
'84, June 19. 
'84, Oct. 28. 
'96, Mar. 26. 
'04, Oct. 



'69, June 10. '92, Mav 9. 

'69, Dec. 14. '88, Dec. 4. 

'93, Dec. 27. '94, June 5 

'92, Sept. 27. '04, May 24. Lowell. 

'6S, Nov. 12. '85, Nov. 3. Andover. 

'99, May 29. Xew Haven, Conn 

'00, Mav 22. Andover. 

'03, Dec. 1. 

'02, Feb. 25. 

'S4, Dec. 2. 

'90. April 8. 

'S2, Feb. 26 



Residence. Employment. 
P. 
P. 

P. c. 

w. c. 

p. 

w. c. 

CM. 

P. 

P. C. 

Prof. 

W.C. 

P. 

P. C. 

P. 

P. 

Prof. 

Evangelist. 

P. C. Em. 

Prof. 

P. 

W.C. 

P.C. 

P.C. 

W.C. 

P.C. 

P.C. 

M. 

P. 

P. 

W.C. 

P. 

W. C. 

P.C. 

P.C. 

P. C. 

W.C. 

Prof. 

P.C. 

P.C. 

Prof. 

Prof. 

W.C. 

Pres. Coll. 

p:c. 



Ames, Iowa. 

Winchester. 

Methuen. 

Lawrence. 

Andover. 

Andover. 

Andover. 

Andover. 



Aurora, N. Y. 
Eddington, Pa. 
Lau-renceville, A* '. J. 
Andover. 
Lawrence. 



, May 15. 
'55, Sept. 7. 
'96, May 4. 
'72, Oct, 23. 
'84, Nov. 6. 
'82, Oct. 26. 
'81, Sept. 21 

'S3, Sept. 6. '85. Nov. 3. 
'77, Jan. 25. '00, Dec. 4. 
Licentiates. — Licensed May 24, 1904. for two years 
Andover; Maurice J. Dundee, Cornish, N. H. 

Stated Meetings. — First Tuesday in December, and fourth Tuesdays in Feb- 
ruary, May and September. 

Rev. Edwin R. Smith, Lowell, scribe. 

* The eccle-iaMical budies in this list mt otherwise d?-ig:iated are A 



Brunsicick, Me. 
Providence, R- I. 



Prof. 

P. c. 

P.C. 

Prof. 

P. 



Arthur G. Cummings, 



1906] 



Ministerial Standing 



47 



2. Barnstable Conference. 



Members. 
Charles S. Bates, 
Charles A. Breck, 
George E. Chapin, 
Sidney Crawford, 
George H. Credeford, 
Ernest W. Eldridge, 
George H. Ewing, 
Washington H. Forbes, 
Edward T. Ford, 
Charles E. Harris, Jr., 
William Harris, 
John W. Hayley, 
Calvin B. Hurlburt, 
Philip A. Job, 
Elihu Loomis, 
Howard A. Morton, 
Richard Owen, 
Frederic Parker, 
E. Irving Rackett, 
John T. Rae, 
Daniel W. Richardson, 
Henry A. Ryder, 
George O. Thompson, 
Hohannes T. Torosvan, 
Rufus B. Tobev, 
Charles H. Whitney, 
William H. Wood well, 



Date of 
Ordination. 
'90, June 6. 
'94, Sept. 25. 
'79, Aug. 20. 
70, Dec. 8. 
'91, Aug. 18. 
'93, April 23. 
'93, May 24. 
'81, July 1. 
'97, May 25. 
'94, Oct. 9. 
'76, June 10. 
'64, Sept. 23. 
'59, Oct. 20. 
'04, Aug. 24. 
'51, Oct. 22. 
'02, May 8. 
'92, Dec. 6. 
'00, Dec. 14. 
'94, Mav 9. 
'73, Aug. 8. 
'62, Aug. 14. 
'04, Mav 2. 
'87, Sept. 15. 
'90, June 1. 
'80, Nov. 30. 
'71, Aug. 31. 
'73, June 12. 



Date of 
Membership. 
'04, April 26. 
'97, Aug. 4. 
'01, Oct. 22. 
'01, Jan. 15. 
'06, May 9. 
'00, May 6. 
'03, Jan. 20. 
'00, Oct. 23. 
'97, Oct. 19. 
'03, Jan. 20. 
'04, Nov. 16. 
'95, Jan. 15. 
'04, Nov. 16. 
'04, Nov. 16. 
'02, Jan. 27. 
'06, Mav 9. 
'06, Mav 9. 
'01, Julv 16. 
'94, July 17. 
'79, Jan."2S. 
'96, Aug. 4. 
'05, Mav 10. 
•01, April 16. 
'06, Mav 9. 
'SI, Jan. 25. 
'72, Jan. 16. 
'89, June 11. 



Residence. Emplc 
West Barnstable. 
Methuen. 

West Xewbury, Vt. 
Provincetown. 
Sandwich. 
Upton. 

Norwich, Conn. 
Gilead, Me. 
Tacoma, Wash. 
Hyannis. 
Woods Hole. 
C. Tujtonboro, N. H. 
South Dennis. 
North Falmouth. 
Centerville. 
Orleans. 
Hyannis. 

Sherman Mills, Me. 
North Pounal, Vt. 
Exeter, N.H. 
Bedford. 
Harwich. 
Truro. 
Centre ville. 
Boston. 
Cambridge. 
Hampton, Conn. 



yment. 
P. 

w. c. 

P. 

p. 

p, 

P. 

p. 

p. 
P. c. 
w. c. 

p. 
w. c. 
w. c. 

p. 
w.c. 

p. 

p. 

p. 
w.c. 
w. c. 

p. 

p. 

p. 
w.c. 
w.c. 

p. 



Rev. Charles S. Bates, West Barnstable, scribe and treasurer. 



3. Berkshire North (Berkshire, 1763), Organized by division, October 14, 1852. 



George W. Andrews, 
T. Nelson Baker, 
John Bascom, 
Seelye Bryant, 
Theodore E. Busfield, 
Edson L. Clark, 
Silas P. Cook, 
William V. W. Davis, 
John H. Denison, 
James E. Gregg, 
Edward H. Griffin, 
Alpheus C. Hodges, 
James H. Laird, 
T. Claire Luce, 
Alford B. Penniman, 
James C. Seagrave, 
Isaac C. Smart, 
William R. Stocking, 
William L. Tenney, 
J. Spencer Voorhees, 
Licentiate. — Addison 



'82, June 7. '84, Dec. 1. Dalton. 

'97, Feb. 16. '02, Jan. 14. Pittsfield. 

'59, Dec. 18. '61, Jan. 2S. Williamstown. 

'90, Oct. 1. '03, Sept. 22. Middlefield. 

'83, Sept. 12. '04, Sept. 20. North Adams. 

'59, Nov. 30. '92, Mar. 8. Dalton. 

'70, Mar. 23. '00, Nov. 22. Pittsfield. 

'77, Sept. 12. '93, Dec. 19. Pittsfield. 

'70, Jan. 30. '85, Sept. 16. Williamstown. 

'03, Aug. 25. '04, Mar. 8. Pittsfield. 

'68, Feb. 6. '73, Dec. 1. Baltimore, Md. 

'81, Nov. 16. '00, June 26. Canaan Four Cor., N. Y. 



'64, Dec. 21. '85, Sept. 16. Hinsdale. 

'85, Dec. 2. '90, Dec. 2. Richmond. 

'S3, April 10. '94, June 12. Chicago. 

'51, Dec. 1. '87, Dec. 6. Hinsdale. 

'85, June 9. '85, Sept. 16. Burlington, Vt. 

'71, June 20. '01, Nov. 12. Williamstown. 

'88, Sept. 20. '95, Dec. 20. Chicago. 

'84, Sept. 7. '04, Mar. 8. Adams. 

F. GifTord, licensed March 13, 1906, for one year. 



P. 

P. 

W.C. 

P. 

P. C. 

W.C. 

Co. Miss. 

P.C. 

W.C. 

P.C. 

Dean Coll. 

P. 

C. 

('. 

P. 

c. 
('. 
c. 



w. 
p. 
w. 

Sec 'v. 
P.C. 



Stated Meetings. — In March and September, and joint meeting each winter 
with Berkshire South. 



Rev. Seelye Bryaut, Middlefield, scribe and treasurer. 



43 



Statistics 



[1906 



4. Berkshire South (Berkshire, 1763), Organized by division October 14, 1S52. 



Members. 
Leon D. Bliss, 
Frelon E. Bolster, 
Henry M. Bowden, 
Arthur Clements, 
Walter W. Curtis, 
John Dooley, 
Aaron W. Field, 
Samuel Hopley, 
Charles P. Ketchen, 
John B. Lewis, 
Stephen T. Livingston, 
R. DeWitt Mallary, 
Evarts W, Pond, 
Clayton J. Potter, 
Charles S. Rich, 
Alvah F. Sherrill, 
Henry W. Smith, 
Garrett V. Stryker, 
George T. Washburn, 
Licentiate. — Robert C. 



Uate of Date of 

Ordination. Membership. 
'89, Oct. 31. '96, Oct. 27. 
'02, Oct. 21. '03, Mayo. 
'86, June 30. '03, May 5. 
'05, Sept. 13. '05, Oct. 31. 
'72, Mar. 20. '83, Oct. 29. 
'72, May 6. '98, April 26. 
'72, Nov. 13. '02, Feb. 4. 
'55, Sept. 19. '90, Jan. 28. 
'88, April 28. '03, Xov. 10. 
'95, Sept. 25. '97, Oct. 26. 
'91. July 8. '91, Nov. 10. 
'76, Oct. 12. '80, July 12. 
'95, May 2. '97, Oct. 26. 
'04, July 5. '04, July 25. 
'96, Sept. 29. '96, Oct. 27. 
'06, Jan. 23. 
'05, Jan. 23. '05, May 3. 
'03, Oct. 30. '03, Nov. 10. 
'59, Mar. 22. '59, July 25. 
Habberly, licensed October 



Residence. Employment. 


Pittsfield. 


W. C. 


Sheffield. 


P. 


South Egremont. 
Southfield. 


P. 


P. 


West Stockbridge. 


P 


Monterey. 


P 


Gilsum, N. H. 


P 


Lee. 


w. c 


Wolcott, Conn. 


p 


Troy, N.Y. 


p. 


Frycburg, Me. 


w. c 


Housatonic. 


p 


Windsor Locks, Conn 


p 


Lenox. 


P.C 


Claremont , Cat. 


w. c 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Prof 


Lee. 


P 


Mill River. 


P.C 


India. A. B. C 


. F. M 



31, 1905, for four year 



Stated Meetings. — Last Tuesdays in January, April, July and October. 
Rev. Frelon E. Bolster, Sheffield, scribe and treasurer. 



Brookfield Conference. 



Austin B. Bassett, 


'87, Sept. 15. 


'00, May 8. 


Hartford, Conn. 


Prof. 


Oscar Bissell, 


'56, May 14. 


'00, May 8. 


Holland. 


W. C. 


Allen A. Bronsdon, 


'97, Dec. 2. 


'00, May 8. 


North Attleboro. 


P. 


Edward L. Chute, 


'SO, July 20. 


'01, May 8. 


Ware. 


P. 


Samuel B. Cooper, 


'87, Jan. 19. 


'03, May 6. 


North Brookfield. 


P.C. 


Lee M. Dean, 


'02, Oct. 16. 


'03, May 6. 


Westbrook, Me. 


P. 


Samuel Eaton, 


'94, April 11. 


'03, May 6. 


• Brimfield. 


P. 


Benson M. Frink, 


'63, Jan. 9. 


'00, May 8. 


West Brookfield. 


w. c. 


Sereno D. Gammell, 


'6S, Sept. 9. 


'00. May 8. 


North Brookfield. 


w. c. 


J. Howard Gaylord, 


'99, Nov. 21. 


'00, May 8. 


West Brookfield. 


P.C. 


George A. Gordon, 


'01, June 4. 


'04, May 4. 


Southbridge. 


P.C. 


Silvanus Hayward, 


'61, Oct. 9. 


'00, May S. 


Globe Village. 


P.C 


William B. Oleson, 


'77, Dec. 4. 


'00, May 8. 


Groton. 


w. c. 


Harlan Page, 


'83, Feb. 6. 


'00, May 8. 


Hard wick. 


p. 


Henry S. Snyder, 


'S5, Oct. 28. 


'00, May 8. 


Gilbertville. 


p 


Willard E. Streeter, 


'97, Oct. 12. 


'05, May 2. 


Brookfield. 


P. c 


Frederick D. Thayer, 


'01, Oct. 2. 


'02, May 7. 


Dudley. 


P.C 


Rev. Edward L. Chute 


, Ware, scribe 









6. Essex North Conference. 



Frank G. Alger, 
D. Frank Atherton, 


'86, Julv 22. 


'98, Dec. 20. 


Cambridge. 


W.C. 


'02, Feb. 5. 


'02, April 15 


Watertown. 


w. c. 


Franklin W. Barker, 


'95, Nov. 3. 


'03, April 21 


Amesbury. 


P.C 


Calvin M. Clark, 


'90, Dec. 30. 


'93, Dec. 19. 


Haverhill. 


P.C 


Arthur Dechman, 


'98, April 10. 


'03, April 21 


. Groveland. 


P.C 


James D. Dingwell, 
Leonard Dodd, 


'95, July 12. 


'00, Dec. 18. 


Amesbury. 


P.C 


78, May 5. 


*99, Oct. 17. 


Nashua, N. H. 


W.C 


James W. Flagg, 


'S2, Oct. 25. 


'01, Oct. 22. 


Merrimac. 


P.C 


David Fraser, 


'95, Dec. 5. 


'99, Oct. 17. 


Manchester, X. H. 


P. 



1906] 



Ministerial Standing 



40 



6. Essex North (Continued). 



Members. 
George L. Gleason, 
Leslie C. Greelev, 
Joseph N. Haskell, 
Charles S. Holton, 
Charles L. Hubbard, 
George H. Hubbard, 
John D. Kingsbury, 
Herbert E. Lombard, 
Warren F. Low, 
George P. Merrill, 
Edward H. Newcomb, 
Manasseh G. Papazian, 
Roland D. Sawver, 
George H. Scott, 
Everett S. Stackpole, 
George L. Todd, . 
Leon P. F. Vauthier, 
Bartlett H. Weston, 
James S. Williamson, 
Richard Wright, 



Date of 
Ordination. 
'66, Feb. 1. 
'98, Dec. 20. 
'00, June 22. 
'92, Nov. 30. 
'68, Sept. 2. 
'84, Sept. 10. 
'56, Sept. 24. 
'96, June 23. 
'94, Sept. 2. 
'00, Oct. 3. 
'97, Nov. 26. 
'90, May 28. 
'00, Mar. 13. 
'73, Sept. 8. 
'82, April 30. 
'87, April 13. 
'05, Dec. 5. 
'91, Oct. 1. 
'90, May 15. 
'90, Nov. 4. 



Date of 
Membership. 
'84, May 20. 
'06, Jan. 31. 
'05, Oct. 31. 
'97, Dec. 21. 
'80, April 20. 
'02, April 15. 
'66, Oct. 17. 
'03, Oct. 27. 
'03, Feb. 26. 
'04, April 26. 
'04, April 26. 
'90, Oct. 21. 
'05, Jan. 17. 
'88, Feb. 21. 
'01, Dec. 17. 
'93, April 18. 
'05, Dec. 5. 
'03, Feb. 26. 
'01, Dec. 17. 
'01, Dec. 17. 



Residence. 


Smployment. 


Haverhill. 


P.C. 


Newburyport. 


P. C. 


Rowley. 


P.C. 


Newbury. 


P.C. 


Arlington. 


w. c. 


Haverhill. 


P.C. 


Salt Lake City. 


Miss. Sunt. 


Byfield. 


P.C. 


Georgetown. 


P.C. 


Newburyport. 


p. 


Newburyport. 


P.C. 


Aintab. 


Prof. 


Haverhill. 


P.C. 


Atkinson, N . H 


P. 


Bradford. 


P.C. 


Havana, Cuba. 


Teacher. 


Haverhill. 


P.C. 


West Newbury. 


P. 


Haverhill. 


P.C. 


Newburyport. 


P.C. 



Rev. Charles S. Holton, Newburyport, scribe. 



7. Franklin Conference. 



James T. Berry, 
Edgar F. Blanchard, 
Edward P. Butler, 
John B. Carruthers, 
Lewis S. Chafer, 
Charles H. Chapin, 
George L. Dickinson, 
William H. Dowden, 
Eugene M. Fran.", 
Joseph A. Goodrich, 
Horace F. Hallett, 
John A. Hawley, 
Edward C. Haves, 
Thomas C. Kinne, 
Charles W. Merriam, 
Frank N. Merriam, 
John K. Moore, 
Horace E. Morrow, 
Sampson Nicholls, 
Albert H. Plumb, Jr.. 
John A. Pogue, 
Martin L. Richardson, 
Edward P. Sevmour, 
Caleb E. Smith, 
N. Fay Smith, 
Arthur L. Truesdale, 
John D. Waldron, 
Carey H. Watson, 
Lyman Whiting, 



'98, Mav 25. 
'94, Nov. 15. 
'74, Oct. 20. 
'83, June 12. 
'00, April 3. 
'S8, June 28, 
'76, Sept. 20. 
'63, Nov. 5. 
'88, Nov. 7. 
'96, Sept. 9. 
'91, July 10. 
'9S, Sept. 14. 
'03, Feb. 26. 
'75, June 28. 
'01, June 25. 
'92, Feb. 24. 
'98, Oct. 11. 
'86, May 11. 
'78, Aug. 1. 
'99, May 11. 
'96, Jan. 28. 
'61, Mar. 7. 
'92, Oct. 25. 
'04, May 26. 
'95, July 25. 
'05, Sept. 26 
'02, June 1. 
'91, Dec. 30. 
'43, Jan. 11. 



'05, Sept. 12. 
'96, Feb. 11. 
'90, June 12. 
'04, Feb. 9. 
'03, Sept. S. 
'05, Sept. 12. 
'92, April 11. 
'01, Feb. 12. 
'04. Nov. 8. 
'96, Sept. 15. 
'99, Nov. 14. 
'03, Feb. 10. 
'04, May 10. 
'93, Dec. 12. 
'04, May 10. 
'9S, Sept. 13. 
'00, Feb. 13. 
'00, Mav 8. 
'05, Feb. 14. 
'03, Sept. 8. 
'96, Mav 12. 
'98, Nov. 8. 
'05, Nov. 14. 
'05, Mar. 9. 
'03, May 12. 
'05, Nov. 14. 
'05, May 9. 
'93, July 5. 
'90, May 13. 



Conway. 

Pater son, K . J . 

Sunderland. 

South Deerfield. 

East Northfield. 

New Salem. 

Prescott. 

Hanover. 

Bernardston. 

Shelburne. 

Ashfield. 

Shelburne Falls. 

Montague. 

Montague. 

Greenfield, 

Turners Falls. 

Orange. 

Rapid City, So. Dak 

Colerain. 

Gill. 

West Wareham. 

Montague. 

Charlemont. 

Heath. 

East Northfield. 

AVendell. 

Buckland. 

Greenfield. 

East Charlemont. 



P. 
P. 
P.C. 
P. 
Evan. 
P. 
P. 

w. c. 

p. 

p. 

p. 

p. 

p. 
w. c. 
P. c. 

P.C. 
P.C. 

Teacher. 
P. 
P. 

w. c. 
w. c. 

p. 

p, 

p. 

p. 

p. 

p. 

p. 



Rev. Edward P. Butler, Sunderland, 



f.n 



Statistics 



[190G 



8. Hampden-, Organized February 13, 1S94, by the union of Hampden West 
East, ■which were formed June 11 and 12, 1844. 



Members. 

Henry L. Bailey, 
William G. Ballantine, 
Charles B. Bliss, 
Henry J. Bruce, 
Collins G. Burnham, 
Hanford M. Burr, 
Frank E. Butler, 
Claude A. Butterfield, 
Charles L. Charron, 
Henry A. Coolidge, 
Thomas W. Davison, 
William N. DeBerry, 
Vernon H. Deming, 
Everett D. Francis, 
Charles H. Gates, 
Louis F. Giroux, 
Frank L. Goodspeed, 
William C. Gordon, 
Edwin H. Hadlock, 
Newton M. Hall, 
Franklin S. Hatch, 
Theron H. Hawks, 
Arthur Hodges, 
Martin S. Howard, 
David L. Kebbe, 
Charles H. Kenney, 
John L. Kilbon, 
Samuel H. Lee, 
John H. Lockwood, 
George W. Love, 
Wilford E. Mann, 
Oliver W. Means, 
Philip S. Moxom, 
George J. Newton, 
Charles Olmstead, 
Hervey G. Pillsbury, 
M. Oakman Patton, 
D. Butler Pratt, 
N. Miller Pratt, 
David A. Reed, 
Edward A. Reed, 
Walter Rice, 
Edwin B. Robinson, 
Alpheus M. Spangler, 
Franklin M. Sprague, 
Thomas S. St. Aubin, 
Frederick C. Taylor, 
Arthur Titcomb, 
John L. R. Trask, 
Rufus S. Underwood, 
William S. Walker, 
Charles S. Wilder, 
Josiah G. Willis, 
George W. Winch, 
Sumner G. Wood, 



Date of Date of 

Ordination. Membership. Residence. Employment. 



'89, Aug. 13. 
'SO, Aug. 20. 
'03, Oct. 2. 
'62, Sept. 11. 
*79, Dec. 10. 
'88, Oct. 24. 
•87, June 22. 
'04, June 10. 
'9S, June 22. 
'92, Dec. 15. 
'99, Dec. 21. 
'99, June 28. 
'98, July 26. 
'95, Nov. 20. 
'51, Nov. 14. 
'S9, April 17. 
'87, June 29. 
'S9, April 14. 
'93, Aoril 23. 
'PI, JulyS. 
'76, May 7. 
'55, Mar. 5. 
'04, Nov. 18. 
'56, Nov. 20. 
'91, June 17. 
'74, April 12. 
'89, June 28. 
'62, Sept. 17. 
'71, Nov. 5. 
'90, April 20. 
'94, June 13. 
'SS, Sept. 19. 
'71, Sept. 19. 
'97, Julv 22. 
'S3, Sep't. 27. 
'S2, Sept. 2S. 
'94, May 20. 
'S9, Sept. 25. 
'96, Nov. 15. 
'SI, June 7. 
"71, June 14. 
'65, July 25. 
'9S, Nov. 21. 
'SS, June 22. 
'75, Sept. 22. 
'93, Oct. 1. 
'91, Dec. 10. 
'SS, Oct. 31, 
'67, Dec. 4. 
'67, Nov. 19. 
'91, Oct. 26 
'90, Feb. IS. 
'76, Oct. 10. 
'75, Oct. 6. 
'SO, Dec. 30. 



'02, Feb. 11. 
'00, Feb. 13. 
'04, Feb. 9. 
'62, Nov. 11. 
'89, May 14. 
'90, May 13. 
'04, Feb. 9. 
'05, Julv 11. 
'06, April 17. 
'05, April 11. 
'05, Feb. 14. 
'01, July 9. 
'01, April 9. 
'97, Feb. 9. 
•03, April 14. 
'89, Nov. 12. 
'95, April 9. 
'04, Nov. 1. 
'00, June 26. 
'00, Feb. 13. 
'89, Feb. 12. 
'8S, Julv 10. 
'05, April 11. 
'69, Feb. 2. 
'91, Julv 14. 
'02, Nov. 11. 
'03, Nov. 10. 
'90, Nov. 11. 
'79, Nov. 11. 
'01, April 9, 
•03, Nov. 10. 
'05, Feb. 14. 
'96, Feb. 11. 
'02, Julv S. 
'99, Julv 11. 
'95, July 9. 
'04, Julv 12. 
'01, April 9. 
'02, Julv S. 
'SI, June 12. 
'SS, Feb. 14. 
'92, Nov. 7. 
'02, Julv S. 
'88, Nov. 13. 
'82, May 9. 
'98, Feb. S. 
'04, Feb. 9. 
'05, Nov. 14. 
'95, Feb. 12. 
'9S, Feb. S. 
'03, Feb. 10. 
'05, Feb. 14. 
'88, Nov. 13. 
'91, Nov. 10. 
'02, Julv S. 



Longmeadow. 


P.C 


Springfield. 


Teacher 


Hampden. 


P.C 


Satara, India. A.B.C.F.M 


Chicopee. 


P.C 


Springfield. 


Teacher 


South Hadley Fall 


s. P.C 


Ludlow. 


P 


Sprincfield. 


P 


West Granville. 


P 


Springfield. 


P 


Springfield. 
North Wilbraham 


P.C 
P.C 


S| >i mgfield. 
Wilbraham. 


w.c 


w. c 


Springfield. 


Teacher 


Springfield. 


P.C 


Westfield. 


P.C 


San Francisco, Cal. P 


Springfield. 


P.C 


Newton. 


w. c 


Springfield. 


w.c 


Brooklyn. 
Wilbraham. 


w.c 


P. c 


Greenwich. 


p 


Jackman, Me. 


p 


Springfield. 


P c 


Springfield. Pres. Coll 


Westfield. 


P.C 


West Springfield. 


p 


Indian Orchard. 


p 


S] iringfield. 


P.C. 


Springfield. 
Wellfieet. 


P.C 


p 


Three Rivers. 


p 


Chicopee Falls. 


P.C 


Plain ville. 


w.c 


Springfield. 
Monson. 


P.C 


P.C 


Springfield. Pres 


S. c. w 


Holyoke. 


P.C 


Agawam. 


P.C 


Holyoke. 


p 


Mittineague. 


P.C 


Tampa, Fla. 


p 


Perkins, P. Q., Canada. P 


Thorndike. 


p 


Springfield. 


p. 


Springfield. 


w.c. 


Spr ngfield. 


Evan. 


A ewington, Conn. 


W.C. 


East Longmeadow 


p. 


Wilbraham. 


w. c. 


Holyoke. 


p. c. 


Blandford. 


P. c 



1906] 



Min isterial Sta nding 



51 



8. Hampden (Continued). 

Date of Date of 

Members. Ordination. Membership. Residence. Employment. 

Herbert P. Woodin, '92, June 26. '99, Feb. 21. Chicopee. P. 

Samuel H. Woodrow, '88, Aug. 30. '99, April 11. Springfield. P. C. 

Licentiate. — James C. Greenough, Westfield, relicensed June 19, 1906, for 

four years. 



Stated Meetings 
and November. 



In Springfield, second Tuesdays in February, April, July 
Rev. Collins G. Burnham, Chicopee, scribe. 



). Hampshire, Organized before 1735. 



Melvin J. Allen, 


'82, Nov. 8. 


'01, Feb. 12. 


Southwick. 


P. 


S. Allen Barrett, 


'88, Feb. 28. 


'04, Sept. 27 


Florence. 


P. C 


John Elliot Bowman, 


'95, Feb. 14. 


'97, June 8. 


Jamaica, Vt. 


P. 


Francis H. Boynton, 


'64, Oct. 20. 


'03, Dec. 8. 


Florence. 


w. c. 


George H. Buck, 


'94, July 5. 


'94, Oct. 16. 


Crown Point, N 


Y. P. 


George H. Burrill, 


'84, June 11. 


'05, June 6. 


Easthampton. 


P. C. 


Willis H. Butler, 


'9S, Nov. 21. 


'04, Feb. 9. 


Northampton. 


P. C. 


William P. Clancy, 


'75, Sept. 1. 


'03, Dec. 8. 


Northampton. 


w. c. 


Elisha G. Cobb, 


'60, June 20. 


'67, Feb. 5. 


Northampton. 


F.C.Em. 


John Cowan, 


'75, May 25. 


'OS, Feb. 8. 


Lyme,K.H. 


P. 


Charles H. Hamlin, 


'76, Sept. 19 


'S5, Oct. 27. 


Easthampton. 


P. C. 


Calvin Keyser, 


'75, Dec. 2S. 


'99, Feb. 21. 


Goshen. 


P.C. 


Gerald Stanley Lee, 


'88, Oct. 23. 


'02, Dec. 16. 


Northampton. 


W. C. 


Robert H. Life, 


'95. Oct. 25. 


'05, Feb. 14. 


Haydenville. 


P. 


Sanford S. Martyn, 


'68, April 29 


'02, June 3. 


Pldntsiille,Coni 


i. W. C. 


Wm. J. Parmelee, M. D., 


'84, Feb. 26. 


'92, Feb. 2. 


Worthington. 
Williamsburg. 


W. C. 


John Pierpont, 


'88, July 26. 


'9S, June 7. 


P.C. 


Harvey Porter, 


'80, Aug. 3. 


'SO, June 1. 


Beirut, Si/ria. 


Prof. Coll. 


W. Stanley Post, 


'93, Dec. 12. 


'01, June 4. 


Ludlow Center. 


P. 


Henry T. Rose, 


'70, May 29. 


'95, Feb. 5. 


Northampton. 


P.C. 


Joseph H. Sawyer, 
L. Clark Seelye, 


'88, Sept. 3. 


'SO, June 1. 


Easthampton. 


Prof. 


'63, Jan. 20. 


'75, Feb. 2. 


Northampton. 


Pres. Coll. 


Henry G. Smith, 


'86, April 15 


'04, Sept. 27 
'99, Feb. 21 


Goshen. 


W. C. 


Henry P. Smith, 


'75, June 8. 


Amherst. 


Prof. 


Hanson E. Thygeson, 


'87, Nov. 2. 


'95, Oct. 29. 


Chesterfield. 


P. 


Henry M. Tyler, 


'72, May 6. 


'84, Feb. 12. 


Northampton. 


Prof. 


George N. Webber, 


'55, Dec. 5. 


'90, Oct. 28. 


Northampton. 


W. C. 


Ralph H. White, 


'02, Aug. 14. 


'03, June 2. 


Cummington. 


P.C. 


Irving F. Wood, 


'94, Mar. 6. 


'96, June 2. 


Northampton. 


Prof. 



Stated Meetings. — Second Tuesday in February, first Tuesday in June, 
fourth Tuesday in September and second Tuesday in December. 

Rev. Elisha G. Cobb, Northampton, scribe. 



10. Hampshire East Conference, Organized December 13, 1S60. 



James B. Adkins, 
J. Cowles Andrus, 
Edward F. Barrow, 
Robert C. Bell, 
Daniel Bliss, 
Edward P. Crowell, 
LeviH. Elweli, 
Thomas A. Emerson, 



'8S, Nov. 8. 
'S3, June 26. 
'03, Oct. 20. 
'69, Nov. 3. 
'55, Oct. 31. 
Licentiate. 
Licentiate. 



Belchertown. 
Enfield. 



'01, June 4 

'02. Feb. 2 

'04, Dec. 6 

'92, Dec. 6. 

'74, Sept. 2 

'65, Sept. 19. Amherst 

'SO, Dec. 2. Amherst 



Granby. 
Beirut, Syria. 



P. 

P. 
P. 

P. 

Pres. Coll. 

Prof. 

Prof. 



Nov. 25. '04. May 31. Hadley. 



52 



Statistics 



[190.6 



10. Hampshire East (Continued). 



Members. 
Henry Fairbank, 
John F. Gleason, 
Frank J. Grimes, 
Edwin A. Grosvenor, 
John W. Lane, 
John P. Man well, 
Richard Scoles, 
William E. Strong, 
Charles S. Walker, 
Robert M. Woods, 



Date of 
Ordination. 
'86, May 27. 
'73, Jan. 7. 
'75, June 2. 
'72, Julv 30. 
'60, Oct. 16. 
'96, Sept. 9. 
'SO, April 21 
'85, Julv 15. 



Date of 
Membership. Residence. Employment. 
'85, May 26. Ahmednagar, India. F. M. 



'95, May 28. South Amherst. 



'03, June z. 
'96, Feb. 4. 
'61, Jan. 9. 
'02, Dec. 2. 
'00, May 29. 
'01, Dec. 3. 



South Hadley 
Amherst. 
North Hadley. 
North Amherst. 
Leverett. 
Amherst. 



•1, Aug. 1. '81, Sept. 20. Amherst. Prof. 
7, Nov. 21. '77, Dec. 4. Hatfield. 



P. 

W. C. 

Prof. Coll. 

P. C. 

P. 

P. 

P.C. 

n Ag. Coll. 

P.C. 



Rev. John F. Gleason, South Amherst, scribe. 



11. Mendox, Organized November 8, 1751. 



John F. Crosby, 


'92, Mar. 30. 


'94, Dec. 4. 


Dover, K.H. 


W. C. 


Robert W. Drawbridge, 


'97, Oct. 5. 


'00, Nov. 21 


Medway. 


P.C 


Edward Evans, 


'75, Sept. 1. 


'01, Sept 30. 
'03, Feb. 11. 


Foxboro. 


p. 


George R. Hewitt, 


'86, June 4. 


West Medway. 


p. 


Edward C. Hood, 


'74, May S. 


'96, Dec. 1. 


Wellesley Hills. 


w. c 


Franklin C. Jones, 


'63, Feb. 4. 


'96, April 7. 


Norfolk. 


w. c 


William M. Macnair, 


'01, Oct. 4. 


'01, Nov. 19 


Mansfield. 


P.C 


Francis J. Marsh, 


'76, Mar. 26. 


'82, Mar. 14. 


Leominster. 


w. c 


Edson J. Moore, 


'61, April 1. 


'86, Sept. 21 


Hill. N. H. 


w. c 


Leroy M. Pierce, 


'70, Feb. 4. 


'98, April 5. 


Medfield. 


p 


John Reid. 


'99, Dec. 5. 


'05, Oct. 2. 


Franklin. 


P.C. 


William L. Ropes, 


'53, Sept. 14. 


'53, Oct. 11. 


Andover. 


Librarian 


Frederick N. Rutan, 


'87, Oct. 16. 


'03, Dec. 1. 


Wrentham. 


P.C 


Franke A. Warfield, 


71, June 10. 


'02, Oct. 7. 


Milford. 


P.C 



Stated Meetings. — First Tuesdays in February, April, October and Decem- 
ber. 

Rev. William M. Macnair, Mansfield, scribe. 



12. Middlesex South Conference. 



Daniel E. Adams, 
Edward E. Bradley, 
S. Ingersoll Briant, 
Charles S. Brooks, 
Edward H. Chandler, 
Daniel W. Clark, 
Frank G. Clark, 
Charles H. Daniels, 
Horace Dutton, 
Lucius R. Eastman, 
Frederick E. Emrich, 
Prescott Fay, 
George B. Frost, 
Lewis W. Hicks, 
Hugh P. Hughes, 
Eugene F. Hunt, 
James B. King, 
Avery E. Lambert, 
George W. Lawrence, 



'60, Dec. 5. 
'93, June 20. 
'6S, April 22. 
'69, Sept. 15. 
'92, Nov. 9. 
'82, June 22. 

73, Nov. 20. 
'68, Jan. 21. 
'62, May 1. 
75, Sept. 16. 
"56, Feb. 27. 
'83, June 7. 
71, Sept. 10. 
'91, Oct. 11. 
'84, Nov. IS. 
'84, July 9. 
'96, Oct. 5. 
'SS, Feb. 14. 



'S6, Dec. 7. 
'94, Dec. 4. 
'99, Feb. 7. 
'01, Feb. 5. 
'97, Sept. 21. 
'99, Dec. 5. 
'05, April 26. 
'04, April 12. 
75, Sept. 21. 
71, Dec. 2. 
'90, Sept. 16. 
'96, Feb. 4. 
'04, Oct. IS. 
'04, May 3. 
'03, April 17. 
'05, ADril 26. 
'99, Sept. 10. 
'05, Oct. 24. 
'99, Sept. 19. 



Wellesley Hills. 


W. C. 


Lincoln. 


P.C. 


Westboro. 


w. c. 


Wellesley. 


w. c. 


Salem. 


Sec 'v. 


Ashland. 


w.c. 


Wellesley. 


w. c. 


So. Framingham. 


P.C. 


Auburndale. 


w.c. 


Framingham. 


P.C. 


Boston. Sec.M 


.H.M.S. 


Saxonville. 


w. c. 


Hudson. 


p. 


Wellesley. 


w.c. 


Saxonville. 


p. 


Maynard. 


P.C. 


Hopkinton. 


w.c 


Framingham. 


Teacher. 


Xcicfanc, Vt. 


W.C 



1906] 



Ministerial Standing 



f,; 



12. Middlesex South (Continued). 



Members. 
William E. Locke, 
Martin F. Me vis, 
Augustus W. Mills, 
Vincent Moses, 
Francis N. Peloubet, 
Lawrence Perry, 
William G. Puddefoot, 
William W. Sleeper, 
Albert D. Smith, 
Frederic E. Sturgis, 
A. Ferdinand Travis, 
Morris H.Turk, 
Benjamin C. Wood, 
Webster Woodbury, 

Rev. Albert D. Smith, 



Date of Date of 

Ordination. Membership. 
'68, Mar. 15. '00, Dec. 4. 
'93, Sept. IS. '94, May 1. 
72, '06, April 17. 

'S7, Oct. 2. '04, Oct. IS. 
'57, Dec. 2. '72, Feb. 6. 
'94, Mav 10, '06, April 17. 
'SS, Jan. 29. '98, Dec. 6. 
'82, Aug. 31. '02, Dec. 2. 
'SS. Oct. 4. '97, Feb. 2. 
'68, Oct. 1. '86, Mav 6. 
'9S, Sept, 27. '05, Apfil 26. 
'9S, Sept. 22. '05, April 26, 
'94, July 10. '97, May 2. 
'6S, Sept. 29. '03, Feb. 3. 

Xorthboro, scribe. 



Residence. Employment 

Weliesley. W. C 

Southboro. P 

Framingham. W. C 

Natick. W. C 

Auburndale. Editor 

Wayland. P 
South Framingham. Sec'y 

Weliesley. P. C 

Northboro. P. C 
Natick. 
Hopkinton 
Natick. 
Rochester, N. Y. 



w. c. 

P.O. 
P.O. 

w. c. 



South Framingham. W. C. 



13. Middlesex Union, Organized January, 1827. 



Walter W. Campbell, 
William O. Conrad, 
A. Frederic Dunnels, 
Amelia A. Frost, 
Robert N. Fulton, 
Tyler E. Gale, 
Henry H. Gay, 
Andrew Groop, 
Edward L. Gulick, 
John C. Handy, 
Henry M. Holmes, 
George M. Howe, 
Alfred S. Hudson, 
John E. B. Jewett, 
Charles W. Loomis, 
Charles P. Marshall, 
Fritz W. Martini, 
Thomas M. Miles, 
Joel D. Miller, 
Frank E. Mills, 
Albert F. Newton, 
Horace Parker, 
Arthur B. Peebles, 
Lewis E. Perry, 
Augustus M. Rice, 
Elijah H. Roper, 
Charles H. Rowley, 
Edward G. Smith, 
George A. Tewksbury, 
Nathan Thompson, 
Ole O. Thorpe, 
Joseph Torrey, 
Francis H. Viets, 
William O. Weeden, 
Albert H. Wheelock, 
Benjamin A. Willmott, 
Franklin P. Wood, 

Stated Meetings. — 
November. 



Nov. 12. '90 
June 8. '98. 
Oct. 2. 
Feb. 14. 
Aug. 19 
Feb. 3, 



'01 



April 16. '92, 
Julv 2. '02, 
Dec. 3. '91, 
April 7. '00, 
May 10. '79, 
July 8. '02, 
Dec. 19. '84, 
Sept. 10. '61, 
May 23. '06, 
July 26. '06, 
May 14. '00, 
Nov. 10. '03, 
April. '71, 
Nov. 13. '98, 
Sept. 5. '02, 
May 31. '64, 
Oct. 25. '05, 
July 15. '05, 
Dec. 17. '04, 
Oct. 27. '98, 
Feb. 23. '86, 



96 

'71. 
Third 



April 13. '02, 
Dec. 21. '95, 
Sept. 13. '77, 
Mar. 1. '96, 
May 30. '94, 
Oct. 18. '05 
Julv 10. '06 
, Julv 3. '05 
Julvl. '01 
July 24. 73 
Tuesdays in 



Nov. IS. 

May 24. 

Jan. 15. 

Nov. 20. 

Nov. 15. 

Sept. 20. 

Mar. 15. 

Sept. 22. 

Sept. 15. 

June 21. 

Jan. 7. 

Mar. 18. 

Dec. 30. 

May 7 . 

Jan. 16. 

Mar. 20. 

Nov. 20. 

Nov. 17. 

July 5. 

Mar. 15. 

Mar. 18. 

Mar. 1. 

Mav 23. 

Mar. 21. 

Nov. 15. 

Jan. 17. 

Mar. 2. 

Mar. 18. 

Sept. 17, 

Sept. 4. 

Jan. 21. 

Jan. 16. 
, Mar. 21. 
, Jan. 10. 
, Jan. 17. 
, Jan. 15. 
, May 6. 
January, 



//. 



Concord. 

Fitchburg. 

Lowell. 

Rutland. 

Littleton. 

Greenville, N 

Groton. 

Fitchburg. 

Hanover, N . H. 

Pittsfield, III. 

Provincetown. 

Groton. 

Ayer. 

Pepperell. 

Ashbv. 

Westford. 

Fitchburg. 

Acton. 

Leominster. 

Hubbardston. 

North Leominster. 

Lynnfield Center. 

South Acton. 

Ayer. 

Dunstable. 

Salem, 

No. Craftsbury, Vt. 

Templeton. 

Concord. 

Laurel, Md. 

Concord. 

Shirley. 

Boxboro. 

Concord. 

Pepperell. 

Lowell. 

Acton. 



P. 

P.C. 

P. 

w.c. 

P.C. 
P.C. 

w.c. 
p. 
w.c. 
w. c. 
w. c. 

P.C. 

p. 

w.c. 

p. 

p. 

P.C. 

p. 

Editor. 

P. 

P. 

W.C. 

P. 
p. 

p. 
w.c. 

p. 
•p. 

p. 
w.c. 
w.c. 

p. 

p. 
w.c. 

p. 

p. 
w.c. 



March, May, September and 



Rev. William J. Batt, Concord Junction, scribe and treasurer. 






54 


Statistics 




[1906 


14. N 


orfolk, Organized May 1 


, 1811. 






Date of 


Date of 






Members. 


Ordination. 


Membership. 


Residence. Employment. 


Fred. H. Allen, 


74, April 26. 


'02, April 15. 


Somerville. 


w. c. 


Henry Clay Alvord, 


79, Sept. 10. 


'87. Feb. 15. 


South Weymouth. 


P. c. 


August L. Anderson, 


'86, June 28. 


'03, June 30. 


New York, A'. Y. 


p. 


Edward Anderson, 


'58, Oct. 13. 


'98, Dec. 20. 


Quincy. 


p. 


Andrew W. Archibald, 


76, Aug. 24. 


'91, June 15. 


Brockton. 


w. c. 


Alfred Ray Atwood, 


'01, July 23. 


'06, Feb. 20. 


Quincy. 


P. c. 


Lewis P. Atwood, 


'55, April 12. 


'02, Oct. 28. 


South" Weymouth. 


w. c. 


Leon H. Austin, 


'01, Oct. 23. 


'02, April 15 


Quincy. 


P.C. 


George Benedict, 


'83, Oct. 9. 


'98, Dec. 20. 


North Abington. 


p. 


Thomas Bickford, 


76, Jan. 27. 


'05, Oct. 31. 


Stoughton. 


p. 


Henry E. Bray, 


'89, Jan. 30. 


'99. Dec. 19. 


Taunton. 


p. 


Frederick W. Burrows, 


'90, April 30. 


'02, Oct. 28. 


Braintree. 


p. 


Edward C. Camp, 


'94, Oct. 10. 


'99, April 18 


Whitman. 


P.C. 


Robert H. Cochrane, 


'99, June 29. 


'03, June 30. 


Weymouth. 


P.C. 


Bernard Copping, 
William W. Dornan, 


79, Sept. 3. 


'04, Feb. 16. 


Stratham, X. H. 


p. 


'94, Nov. 20. 


'02, April 15 


Plymouth. 


p. 


Almon J. Dyer, 


'86, June 4. 


'98, Feb. 15. 


Sharon. 


P.C 


Edgar B. French, 


'97, Sept. 7. 


'03, Dec. 15. 


Brockton. 


P. 


William Fryling, 


'91, May 17. 


'05, June 13. 


Easton. 


P. 


DeMont Goodyear, 


'00, Jan. 31. 


'00, April 17 


Abington. 


P.C. 


Lyman E. Hall. 


'82, Mav 25. 


'05, Dec. 19. 


No. Abington. 


w.c. 


Edwin N. Hardy, 


'90, Nov. 6. 


'95, Dec. 17. 


Quincy. 


P.C. 


Elijah Harmon, 


'67, Oct. 18. 


'02. Aoril 15 


South Braintree. 


W.C 


Ralph J. Haughton, 
Karl F. Henrikson, 


'91, Nov. 24. 


'02, Dec. 16. 


Weymouth. 


p. 


'96, Oct. 1. 


'01, April 16 


Quincy. 


p. 


Calvin G. Hill, 


72, Sept. 5. 


'84, June 10. 


Milton. 


w.c. 


Alan Hudson, 


'92. Dec. 28. 


'93, April 18 


Brockton. 


P.C. 


Emerson L. Hunt, 


'94, Oct. 24. 


'03, April 28 


Charlestown. 


M. 


Henry S. Huntington, 


'66, Jan. 31. 


'91, Oct. 17. 


Milton. 


p. 


Robert R. Kendall, 


78, Jan. 30. 


'92, Dec. 20. 


Winter Park, Fla. 


Prof. 


Harry W. Kimball, 


'95, July 2. 


'04, Dec. 20. 


S. Wevmouth. 


P. 


James Lade, 


'85, June 6. 


'03, April 28 


Bristol X. H. 


P. 


John M. Lord, 


'51, Dec. 21. 


'93, Dec. 19. 


Weymouth. 


W.C. 


Frank B. McAllister, 


'99, Oct. 3. 


'05, Oct. 31. 


Cohasset, 


P.C. 


Thomas D. McLean, 


'93, June 15. 


'06, Feb. 20. 


Plymouth. 


W.C. 


William S. A. Miller, 


'96, June 25. 


'01, Dec. 17. 


East Bridgewater. 


P. 


Samuel Morrison, 


'65, Oct. 24. 


'90, Oct. 28. 


Braintree. 


W.C. 


Edward Norton, 


'64, Dec. 28. 


7.5, Jan. 26. 


Quincy. 


P. Em. 


Frank H. Palmer, 


'80, Sept. 28 


'86, April 20 


Braintree. 


W.C. 


Albert F. Pierce, 


77, Sept. 3. 


'99, April 18 


Campello. 


P.C. 


Edward A. Robinson, 


'83, July 11. 


'05, Oct. 31. 


Hingham. 


P. 


Philmer A. Sample, 


'04, April 27 


'04, Oct, 25. 


Easton Center. 


W.C. 


John L. Sewall, 


'82, July 19. 


'05, June 13, 


Randolph. 


P.C. 


Charles E. Stowe, 


78, Feb. 28. 


'03, April 28 


Bridgewater. 


P.C. 


Arthur Truslow, 


'96, Sept. 30 
'89, Feb. 6. 


'99, Oct. 31. 


Greenp't, X. Y. Y. 


M. C. A. 


Thomas H. Vincent, 


'97, Dec. 28. 


North Weymouth. 


P. 


Edgar C. Wheeler, 


'96, Sept. 22 


'02, Dec. 16. 


Rockland. 


P. 


Isaac C. White, 


'50, Oct. 23. 


'90, June 10. 


Plymouth. 


W.C. 


Licentiate. — Albert V 


Fisher, licensed February 


20, 1906, for three } 


ears. 



Stated Meetings. — Last Tuesday in October, third Tuesdays in December, 
February and April, and second Tuesday in June. 

Rev. Almon J. Dyer, Sharon, scribe and treasurer. 



1906] 



Ministerial Standing 



r>:> 



15. Old Colony, Organized August IS, 1S10. 



Members. 
Haig Adadourian, 
Harry L. Brickett, 
George P. Byington, 
Samuel M. Cathcart, 
Truman D. Childs, 
Frederick M. Cutler, 
John Graham, 
Charles F. Hersey, 
Matthew C. Julien, 
Frederick B. Lyman, 
John A. MacColl, 
William C. Martyn, 
Benjamin W. Pennock, 
Robert L. Rae, 
Frank E. Ramsdell, 
Caleb L. Rotch, 
George W. Stearns, 
John P. Trowbridge, 
Charles L. Woodworth, 



Date of 
Ordinatioa.' 
'97, Nov. 3. 
'83, May 23. 
'68, Mar. 11. 
'96, Dec. 1. 
'73, May 21. 
'9S, June 8. 
'90, Jan. 17. 
'93, Jan. 2.5. 
'72, Dec. 11. 
'00, Oct. 9. 
'83, Jan. 31. 
'98, Nov. 29. 
'88, June 27. 
'89, Oct. 14. 
'91, June 30. 
'79, Oct. 9. 
'83, Aug. 1. 
'74, Sept. 17. 
'89, Dec. 17. 



Date of 
Membership. 
'05, Feb. S. 
'96, Feb. 12, 
'00, Feb. 14. 
'03, Nov. 11. 
'02, May 14. 
'03, Nov. 11. 
'90, Feb. 12. 
'94, Nov. 14. 
*78, July 30. 
*02, Feb. 12. 
'90, Feb. 12. 
'04, Nov. 9. 
'00, Mav9. 
'90, Feb. 12. 
'04, Mar. 30. 
'00, Mav9. 
'95, Nov. 13. 
'03, May 13. 
'03, Feb. 11. 



Residence. 



-Imrv. 



West Ti 
Marion. 
Winsted, Conn. 
Middleboro. 
Rochester. 
Edgartown. 
Warwick. 
New Bedford. 
New Bedford. 
Fairhaven. 
Providence. 
Acushnet. 
Grafton, Vt. 
Brockton. 
New Bedford. 
Monmouth, Me. 
Jamaica Plain. 
North Rochester. 
Leiriston. Me. 



P. 
P.C. 
W. C. 
P.C. 

w.c. 

p. 

p. 
w.c. 

P.C. 

p. 
p. 

P.C 

p. 

P.C. 

P.O. 

p. 
w.c. 

P.C. 

w.c. 



Stated Meetings. — Second Wedne: 
Rev. Frederick B. Lyman, Fairhaven 



days in February, May 
scribe. 



16. Plymouth, Organized May IS, 1858. 



Millidge T. Anderson, 
John W. Brown ville, 
Alfred DeBarritt, 
Fenton E. Frazee, 
Adoniram J. Leach, 
Burton A. Lucas, 
Frederic W. Manning, 
Henry B. Mason, 
Francis Moon, 
Frederick B. Noyes, 
Oscar F. Stetson, 
John Wild, 
George W. Wright, 



'00, April 22. '03, Dec. 15. West Hanover. 
'73, Dec. 18. '85, Nov. 17. West Gloucester. 
'95, May 31. '97, Nov. 16. Cienfuegos, Cuba. 
'97, May 12. '02, Jan. 5. West Newburv. 
'89, April 7. '01,Mav2S. Reading. 
'97, Sept. 15. '02, Mar. 18. Marshfield. 
'91, Dec. 31. '92, Aug. 16. Nantucket. 
'92, June 28. '00, Nov. 20. Duxbury. 
'80, July 2. '89, Nov. 19. ChiltonviUe. 
'90, Oct. 2S. '00, Sept. 25. Scituate. 
'02, Mavl4. '01,Mav28. North Carver. 
'92, April 20. '92, Aug. 16. Medford. 
'77, Dec. 5. '93, Nov. 21. Boston. 



P 
P. 
P. 

P. 
W. C. 

P. 

P. 

P. 
W.C. 

p. 

P.C. 

p. 

W.C. 



Licentiate. — James I. Thomas, Halifax, license renewed on May 8, 1893, with- 
out limit of time. 

Stated Meetings. — Third Tuesdays in March, May, October and December. 
Rev. Burton A. Lucas, Marshfield, scribe and treasurer. 



17. Salem, Organized by Union, December 1, 1SS5 (Essex South, September 



Harry C. Adams, 
Israel Ainsworth, 
William P. Alcott, 
Adolph A. Berle, 
Emery L. Bradford, 
James F. Brodie, 
Arthur S. Burrill, 



1717: Salem, October 15, 1840). 



),Oct. 22. '9S, Jan. 11. Danvers. 
), April 11. '89, May 14. Rockport. 



P.C. 
P.C. 



Feb. 18. '81, Sept. 13. Boxford (Linebrook). P. C. 



'87, Sept. 22. '04, Nov. 8. Salem. 
'92, July 1. '94, Jan. 9. East Weymouth. 
'82, Feb. 21. '89, Nov. 12. Xashville, Tenn. 
'96, Sept. 26. '06, Jan. 16. Nahant. 



P. 
P.C. 
V. c. 

p. 



5G 



Statistics 



[1906 



17. Salem (Continued). 



Date of 

Members. Ordinatiorj. 

Edwin H. Bvington, '87, Mav 26. 

DeWitt S. Clark, '68, Xo\-. 11. 

Edward Constant, 'S3, Aug. 30. 

Arthur J. Co veil, '90, Oct. 21. 

Daniel L. Crafts, '76, Julv 19. 

Temple Cutler, '61, Feb. 20. 

Hugh Elder, '6S, Jan. 29. 

George E. Freeman, '5S, Oct. 6. 

George A. Hall, '86, April 13. 

Chauncey J. Hawkins, '99, Mav 19. 

Rufus P. Hibbard, '68, Aug. 4. 

George A. Jackson, '72, Sept. 26. 

John A. Johnson, '92, Aug. 6. 

Frederic I. Kelley, 'S9, Dec. 30. 

Edward P. Kelly. '87, Sept. 22. 

John C. Labaree, '63, Feb. 4. 

Edward A. Lathrop, '95, Nor. 26. 

Frederick J. Libby, '0.5, May 24. 

Clarence A. Lincoln, '05, June 9. 

Frank A. L. Lindholm, '9S, Oct. 6. 

Carl A. Lundgren, '93, Aug. 17. 

Robert A. MacFadden, '96, June 16. 

Albert W. Moore, '73, Jan. 22. 

Jesse G. Nichols, '94, Sept. 13. 

Warren L. Noves, '6S, Nov. 1. 

George W. Osgood, 78, Jan. 26. 

George W. Owen, '03, Julv 1. 

Albert B. Peabody, '60, Mav 24. 

William G. Poor, 'S5, Mav 22. 

Frank H. Reed. '86. June 24. 

William E. Renshaw, '84, June 14. 

Charles B. Rice, '59, Dec. 7. 

F. Arthur Sanborn, '92, Oct. 4. 

Jotham B. Sewall, '55. Feb. 2S. 

David W . Snell. '00, June 27. 

Everard W. Snow, '01, Nov. 21. 

Markham W. Stackpole, '02, April 29. 

Lewis J. Thomas, '78, June 18. 

Nicholas Van der Pyl, '93, Sept. 13. 

Arthur N. Ward, '79, Feb. 25. 

T. Frank Waters, '76, Oct. 23. 

Charles C. Watson, '67, Julv 2. 

Charles F. Weeden, '88, April 4. 

Walter B. Williams, '05, Mar. 1. 

Will C. Wood, '6S, Oct. 15. ' 

Stated Meetings. — Third Tuesday 
May, September and November. 

Rev. T. Frank Waters, Ipswich, scribe. 



Date of 
Membership. 
'00, Nov. 13. 
'79, June 2. 
'92, xMar. 8. 
'9S, Nov. 8. 
'99, Mar. 14. 
'S6, Sept. 26. 
'68, April 7. 
'96, Mar. 10. 
'86, Dec. 1. 
'00, Sept. 11. 
'8S, Sept. 11. 
'79, Jan. 14. 
'95, Mar. 12. 
'90, Mar. 11. 
'03, Sept. 15. 
'96, Nov. 10. 
'01, Sept. 10. 
'06, Mar. 20. 
'06, Jan. 16. 
'00, Jan. 9. 
'94, May 9. 
'05, Mar. 14. 
'84, Mar. 11. 
'95, Jan. 8. 
'06, Mar, 20. 
'96, Mav 26. 
'03, Nov. 10. 
'98, Nov. 8. 
'04, Sept. 13. 
'86, Dec. 1. 
'01, Nov. 12. 
'64, Mav 1. 
'04, Nov. 8. 
'95, Mar. 12. 
'04, Sept. 13. 
'05, Jan. 10. 
'03, Sept. 15. 
'9S, Sept. 13. 
'04, Mar. 8. 
'92, Jan. 12. 
'79, Feb. 4. 
*94, Jan. 9. 
'02, Jan. 14. 
'05, Nov. 21. 
'69, Jan. 12. 

January, fourth Tuesdays in March, 



Residence. Employment 


Beverly. 


P. C 


Salem. 


P. C 


Ipswich. 


P 


Lynn. 


P.C 


Stratham, N. H. 


P 


Ipswich. 


W. C 


Fowes, Scotland. 


P 


Belmont. 


W. C 


Peabody. 


W.C 


Jamaica Plain. 


P.C 


Gloucester. 


P.C 


Swampscott. 


W.C 


Lynn. 


P.C 


Derry, N.H. 


P 


Pigeon Cove. 


P.C 


Saugus. 


P 


Essex. 


P 


Magnolia. 


P c 


Manchester. 


P. c 


Lowell. 


p 


Joliet, III. 


W.C 


Dan vers. 


P.C 


Lynn. 


W.C 


South Hadley. 
West Peabody. 


P.C 


p 


Lynn. 


W.C 


Lynn. 


P.C 


East Boxford. 


W.C 


Topsfield. 


p 


Ossipee, N.H. 


p 


Lynnfield. 


p 


Dan vers. 


Sec'y 


West Gloucester. 


Brookline. 


W.C 


New York, N. Y. 


W.C 


Beverly. 


P.C 


Boston. 


Asst . P 


Duxbury. 


W.C 


Marblehead. 


P.C. 


Somerville. 


W.C 


Ipswich. 


P.C. 


Lynn. 


W.C. 


Lynn. 


P.C. 


Boxford. 


P.C. 


Boston. 


W.C. 



18. Suffolk North, Organized July 2, 1S22. 

Asher Anderson, '73, July 15. '02, Nov. 25. Cambridge. Sec'y Nat'l C. 

Milan C. Avres, '74, Mav 30. '85, Feb. 15. Newton Highlands. Editor. 

Charles E. Beals, '94, April 8. '04, Mar. 5. Cambridge. P. C. 

Reuhen A. Beard, '79, Sept. 10. '9S, Jan. 25. Cambridge. W. C. 

Robert W. Beers, '84, April 30. '05, Nov. 2S. Somerville. P. C. 

Alexander P. Bourne, '95, Dec. 4. '05, Jan. 31. Cambridge. Asst. P. C. 



1906] 



Ministerial Standing 



57 



18. Suffolk North (Continued). 



Members. 


Ordination. 


Membership. 


Residence. Employment 


Howard A. Bridgman, 
G. Wolcott Brooks, 


'90, Nov. 19. 


'87, Dec. 13. 


Brookline. 


Editor. 


77, Oct. 10. 


'85, April 21 


Dorchester. 


P. 


Samuel C. Bushnell, 


'79, June 4. 


'90, May 28. 


Arlington. 


P. C. 


C. F. Hill Oathern, 


'86, Sept. 1. 


'93, Dec. 6. 


Braintree. 


P. 


William C. Detling, 


'97, Mar. 3. 


'95, Oct. 30. 


Si/!vania, Ohio. 


P. 


M. Angelo Dougherty, 


'69, June 15. 


'87, June 7. 


( 'ambridge. 


TV. C. 


Walter S. Eaton, 


'91, April 26. 


'94, Feb. 7. 


Wenham. 


P. 


Daniel Evans, 


'91, May 26. 


'00, Jaa. 30. 


North Cambridge. 


P. C. 


Oren D. Fisher, 


'75, Sept. 28. 


'99, May 31. 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


P. 


Herbert W. Gleason, 


'S7, Mar. 7. 


'05, Nov. 28. 


Boston. 


TV. C. 


James J. Goodacre, 


• '97, Feb. 24. 


'02, Jan. 28. 


Hamilton. 


P. 


George H. Gutterson, 


'78, Dec. 3. 


'95, June 10. 


Winchester. Sec'y 


A. M. A. 


Emil 0. Hedberg, 




'05, Nov. 28. 


Sweden. 


TV. C. 


John A. Higgons, 


'97, July 17. 


'04, May 31. 


Chelsea. 


P. C. 


John V. Hilton, 


'60, July. 


'77, Dec. 18. 


Boulder, Colo. 


TV. C. 


John W. Horner, 


'76, Oct. 9. 


'04, Nov. 29. 


Revere. 


P. C. 


Frank H. Kasson, 


'79, Nov. 13. 


'83, Sept. 18 
'95, Feb. 6. 


Boston. 


Editor. 


Horace H. Leavitt, 


'73, June 19. 


Somerville. 


TV. C. 


Duncan MacDermid, 


'S6, Oct. 28. 


'93, Feb. 8. 


Boston. 


TV. C. 


Peter MacQueen, 


'91, May 8. 


'93, Oct. 4. 


Charlestown. 


P. 


Alexander MeKenzie, 


'61, Aug. 28. 


'67, April 16 
'03, May 26. 


Cambridge. 


P.C. 


Edward C. Moore, 


'84. 


Cambridge. 


Prof. 


George F. Moore, 


'78, Feb. 2. 


'03, May 26. 


Cambridge. 


Prof. 


W'illiam J. Murray, 


'79, April 28. 


'00, Mar. 27. 


Boston. 


w.c. 


Sylvester S. Nickerson, 


'76, Dec. 26. 


'89, Sept. 25 


Somerville. 


TV. C. 


Charles L. Noyes. 


'81, Mar. 29. 


'S3, Feb. 20. 


Somerville. 


P.C. 


Charles H. Percival, 


'84, Oct. 14. 


'02, Jan. 28. 


Maiden. 


P. 


Lawrence Phelps, 


'78, Sept. 5. 
'82, Feb. 8. 


'92, April 5. 


Leominster. 


p. 


Eddv T.Pitts, 


'00, Nov. 27 


Saylesville, R. I. 


p. 


Charles H. Pope, 


'65, July 27. 


'97, Mar. 30. 


Cambridge. 


w.c. 


Arthur P. Pratt, 


'01, Mar. 13. 


'04, Nov. 29 


Chelsea. 


P.C. 


Paul Rader, 


'04, Sept. 21. 


'04, Nov. 29 


East Boston. 


P.C. 


Edward K. Rawson, 


•72, Oct. 9. 


'83, April 10 


Annapolis, Md. 


Prof. 


David C. Reid, 


'S4, July 29. 


'05, Nov. 28 


Cambridge. 


P.C. 


James H. Ropes, 


'01, June 18. 


'01, Nov. 26 


Cambridge. 


Prof. 


James H. Ross, 


'78, Feb. 22. 


'88, Nov. 20 


Cambridge. 


Editor. 


Langley B. Sears,- 


'96, Oct. 15. 


'06, Mar. 27. 


East Boston. 


P. 


William H. Spence, 


'94, Nov. 19. 


'02, Sept. 30 


Cambridge. 


P.C. 


Alfred E. Stembridge, 


'92, Mar. 28, 


'9S, Sept. 27 


W'oburn. 


W.C. 


William I. Sweet, 


'87, April 19. 


'9S, May 31. 


Everett. 


p. 


John G. Taylor, 


'73, Jan. 9. 


'00, Jan. 30. 


Arlington Heights. 


P.C. 


Edward Sampson Tead, 


'78, Sept. 17. 


'86, Feb. 12. 


Somerville. Sec'y 


C. E. S. 


Edward P. Tenney, 


'59, Oct. 19. 


'00, Jan. 30. 


North Cambridge. 


W.C. 


W. Sherman Thompson, 


'91, Oct. 14. 


'01, Nov. 26 


Bedford. 


W.C. 


C. A. G. Thurston, 


'77, Oct. 17. 


'00, Mar. 27. 


Chelsea. , Evan. Asso. 


Charles F. Thwing, 


'79, Sept. 24 


'79, Dec. 16. 


Cleveland, O.' Pres. Univ. 


Robert W. Wallace, 


'72, May 26. 


'97, Nov. 30 


Somerville. 


w.c. 


George Washburn, 


'63, July 29. 


'78, Oct. 13. 


Constantinople. Pres. Coll. 


George Y. Washburn, 


'82, April 26. 


'00, Jan. 30. 


Everett. 


P. 


diaries H. Williams, . 


'99, Oct. 19. 


'00, Jan. 30. 


Gloucester. 


P.C. 


Albert E. Winship, 


1 '75, Mar. 17. 


'76, June 13. 


Somerville. 


Editor. 


Edward C. Winslow, 


'81, Nov. 2. 


'01, Oct. 8. 


Brookline. 


W.C. 


Richard G. Woodbridge 


'81, April 6. 


'03, Mar. 31. 


Somerville. 


P.C. 


Licentiates. — Thomas M. Carson, licensed November 17. 1903. for three vears; 


William M. Oane, licensed April 5, 1904 


, for three years; Francis S. Child 


licensed 


November 28, 1905, for three years. 








Stated. Meetings. — 


Last Tuesdays 


in January, 


March, May, September and 


November. 










Rev. John G. Taylor, 


Arlington Heig 


its, scribe. 







5N 



Statistics 



[1906 



19. SuffoliI South, Organized January 27, 1S29. 



Members. 
William H. Allbright, 
Herbert A. Barker, 
Henry E. Barnes, 
William T. Beale, 
Warren F. Bickford, 
George M. Boynton, 
Samuel A. Brown, 
William R. Campbell, 
Edward A. Chase, 
Francis E. Clark, 
Alfred E. Colton, 
Perley B. Davis, 
Morton Dexter, 
Charles A. Dickinson, 
Edward P. Drew, 
Albert E. Dunning, 
Nathaniel H. Egleston, 
Solomon P. Fav, 
George H. Flint, 
William Gallagher, 
Robert F. Gordon, 
Richard B. Grover, 
Benj. F. Hamilton, 
John A. Hamilton, 
Henry N. Hoyt, 
Albion H. Johnson, 
Frederick T. Knight, 
Arthur Little, 
Achilles L. Loder, 
Samuel L. Loomis, 
Charles D. Lothrop, 
Frank L. Luce, 
Augustine P. Manwell, 
Henry G. Megathlin, 
Frank W. Merrick, 
Jason G. Miller, 
Cyrus P. Osborne, 
Arthur H. Pingree, 
Albert H. Plumb, 
Winfred C. Rhoades. 
Frederick B. Richards, 
Edward H. Rudd, 
Arsene B. Schmarvonian, 
Joseph B. Seabury, 
Melville A. Shaver, 
Judson Smith, 
George F. Stanton, 
Herbert W. Stebbins, 
Charles H. Washburn, 
Eugene C. Webster. 
Cyrus L. D. Younkin, 



Date of 
Ordination. 
'79, June 6. 
'03, June 15. 
'62, May 2S. 
'82, June 7. 
'76, June 20. 
'63, Oct. 28. 
'00, Dec. 27. 
'81, Oct. 12. 
'84, Mav 28. 
'76, Oct. 19. 
'84, Mav 2S. 
'62, Jan. 29. 
'73, April 30. 
'79, Sept. 27. 
'98, Oct. 2. 
'70, Sept. 29. 
'45, Feb. 19. 
'49, Sept. 6. 
'94, Oct. 22. 
'74, Dec. 1. 
'75, Mav 12. 
'81, Oct. 4. 
'65, June 28. 
'61, Jan. 29. 
'76, Mav 22. 
'65, Oct. 13. 
'97. Oct. 5. 
'63, Mar. 16. 
'77, Mav S. 
'80, Oct. 14. 
'54, Dec. 14. 
'95, Nov. 6. 
'00, Sept. 18 
'96, Dec. 18. 
'91, Oct. 12. 
'99, Sept. 12. 
'65, Nov. 2. 
'98, Nov. 16. 
'58, Nov. 10. 
'99, May 17. 
'91, Dec. 30. 
'87, Oct. 25. 
'99, June 30. 
'75, Sept. 8. 
'98, Dec. 21. 
'66, Oct. 17. 
'66, June 6. 
'83, Aug. 28. 
'85, Dec. 2. 
'90, Mav 2S. 
'93, April S. 



Date of 
Membership. 
'91, Mar. 11. 
'05, May 10. 
'06, Jan. 10. 
'99, May 10. 
'92, May 11. 
'80, Nov. 10. 
'01, Mar. 13. 
'81, Nov. 9. 
'00, Jan. 24. 
'S4, Jan. 16. 
'99, Nov. 8. 
'63, July 7. 
'84, Mar. 12. 
'99, Nov. 8. 
'05, Mav 10. 
'71, Jan. 2. 
'02, Sept. 17. 
'82, Mar. 8. 
'96, Jan. 15. 
'9S, Jan. 12. 
'05, Sept. 13. 
'92, Mav 11. 
'72, Mar. 12. 
'85, Mav 13. 
'9S, May 11. 
'S3, May 9. 
'97, Nov. 10. 
'S9, Sept. IS. 
'91, Nov. 5. 
'97, Sept. 29. 
'93, Mar. 15. 

'05, Mav 10. 
'02, Sept. 17. 
"91, Nov. 5. 
'05, May 10. 
'00, Jan. 24. 
'02, Nov. 12. 
'85, Jan. 14. 
'00, Sept. 19. 
'06, Jan. 10. 
'01, Sept. IS. 
'02, Mav 14. 
'85, Mav 13. 
'06, Jan. 10. 
'S5, Mar. 11. 
'90, Jan. 15. 
'97, Sept. 29. 
'04, Nov. 16. 
■94, Sept. 19. 
"92, Mar. 9. 



Residence. Employment 


Roxbury. 


P. C 


Jamaica Plain. 


P. c 


Brookline. 


w. c 


Dorchester. 


p 


Muskogee, I. T. 


p 


Newton Centre. 


Sec'v 


Boston. 


P. C 


Roxbury. 


P. c 


Wollaston. 


P. c 


Auburndale. Y. P 


S. C. E 


Dorchester. 


Sec'v 


West Roxbury. 


w.c 


Boston. 


Editor 


Sacramento, Cal. 


P 


Roxbury. 


P. c 


Brookline. 


Editor 


Jamaica Plain. 


W.C 


Dorchester. 


W.C 


Dorchester. 


p 


South Braintree. 


Prin 


Brookline. 


P 


Cambridgeport. 


P 


Roxbury. 


W.C 


Sharon. 


W.C 


Hvde Park. 


P. C 


Clarendon Hills. 


P 


Northbridge. 


P 


Dorchester. 


P.C. 


Thcljord, Vt. 


p. 


Jamaica Plain. 


P.C. 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


W.C 


Dorchester. 


P.C 


Canton. 


p 


Wollaston. 


p 


West Roxbury. 


P. c 


Atlantic. 


p 


Cambridge. 
Norwood. 


Sec'v 


P.C 


Roxbury. 


P.C 


Roxburv. 


P.C 


South Boston. 


P.C 


Dedham. 


P.C 


Constantinople, Tu 
Wellesley Hills. 


hey. 


W.C 


Boston. 


Evan 


Roxbury. A. B 


C. F. M 


Boston. 


W.C 


Boston. 


W.C 


Neponset. 


P.C 


Jamaica Plain. 


W.C 


Boston. 


Miss 



Stated Meetings-. — Second Wednesday 
ary, March, September and November. 



Mav, third Wednesdavs in Janu- 



Rev. Frank L. Luce, Dorchester, scribe and treasurer. 



1906] 



Ministerial Sta nding 



.VJ 



20. Suffolk West, Organized January 8, 1S67. 



Members. 
Garrett L. Allen, 
Herbert M. Allen, 
Orson P. Allen, 
James L. Barton, 
Charles A. Bidwell, 
Erastus Blakeslee, 
George H. Cate, 
Edward L. Clark, 
William H. Cobb, 
Arcturus Z. Conrad, 
Allen E. Cross, 
Calvin Cutler, 
Samuel W. Dike, 
Frank P. Estabrook, 
Parris T. Farwell, 
Addison P. Foster, 
Bradford M. Fullerton, 
George P. Oilman, 
George A. Gordon, 
John O. Haarvig, 
Harris G. Hale, 
Charles E. Harrington, 
George A. Hood, 
William S. Kelsey, 
William A. Knight, 
Edwin Leonard. 
Oscar Lindegren, 
George A. Matthews, 
William T. McElveen, 
Darius A. Morehouse, 
Edward M. Noyes, 
Henry E. Oxnard, 
Henry J. Patrick, 
Cornelius H. Patton, 
Charles A. Perry, 
George G. Phipps, 
Cyrus Pickett, 
Edward C. Porter, 
Theodore P. Prudden, 
Isaac O. Rankin, 
Oliver D.Sewall, 
Ezra H. Slack, 
George T. Smart, 
William S. Smith, 
Charles M. Southgate, 
S. Lewis B. Speare, 
Allen A. Stockdale, 
E. Ellsworth Strong, 
Reuen Thomas, 
Alexander S. Twombly, 
Elbridge C. Whiting, 



Date of 
Ordination. 
'99, Sept. 17. 
'93, June 8. 
'55, Sept. 26. 
'85, June 29. 
'93, June 30. 
'80, Feb. 17. 
'79, April 2. 
'61, Aug. 8. 
'72, April 18. 
'85, June 2. 
'92, Dec. 29. 
'62, Mar. 12. 
'69, Feb. 8. 
'93, Feb. 7. 
'83, Oct. 23. 
'66, Oct. 3. 
'68, Feb. 12. 
'72, Aug. 2S. 
77, Jan. 20. 
'83, Oct. 13. 
'91, Sept. 3. 
'74, Oct. 27. 
'69, Sept. 30. 
'85, May 27. 
'86, Sept. 4. 
'52, Mar. 25. 
'93, Dec. 7. 
'95, April 3. 
'90, May 15. 
'65, June IS. 
'83, Sept. 26. 
'94, Nov. 13. 
'54, Nov. 16. 
'87, Feb. 16. 
'82, Nov. 16. 
'68, Jan. 23. 
'67, Feb. 28. 
'84, June 24. 
'74, Dec. 22. 
'80, July 21. 
'92, Sept. 27. 
'81, Oct. 13. 
'88, Sept. 7. 
'54, April 27. 
'70, Dec. 15. 
'74, Jan. 30. 
'04, May 16. 
'59, April 10. 
'58, Dec. 7. 
'59, Feb. 10. 
'91, Sept. 30. 



Date of 
Membership. 
'04, Feb. 17. 
'03, Feb. 11. 
'01, Oct. 23. 
'97, Feb. 8. 
'05, Apr. 12. 
*94, Feb. 12. 
'94, June 11. 
'93, April 11. 
'88, June 11. 
'06, Apr. 4. 
'02, June 11. 
'68, Feb. 4. 
'87, Oct. 11. 
'02, April 9. 
'95, Dec. 9. 
'01, Oct. 23. 
'81, Dec. 18. 
'85, Oct. 6. 
'86, April 20. 
'95, Dec. 9. 
'97, April 12. 
'95, Dec. 9. 
'96, Feb. 10. 
'02, April 9. 
'03, Feb. 11. 
'93, Dec. 11. 
'00, June 11. 
'9S, Dec. 19. 
'00, Dec. 12. 
'90, Dec. 3. 
'95, Feb. 25. 
'00, Feb. 13. 
'67, Jan. 8. 
'06, Feb. 14. 
'04, Feb. 17. 
'78, Dec. 10. 
'01, Dec. 11. 
'90, Feb. 10. 
'94, Dec. 10. 
'96, June 8. 
'97, Oct. 11. 
'01, April 17. 
'02, April 9. 
'74, Dec. 8. 
'96, Feb. 10. 
'96, Dec. 14. 
'05, Dec. 13. 
'67, April 8. 
'76, Feb. 8. 
'93, April 11. 
'00, June 11. 



Residence. Employment. 
WestStewartstown,N.H. P. 
Constantinople. F. M. 

Constantinople. W. C. 

Newton Cen. A. B. C. F. M. 



Brookline. 


P. 


Brookline. 


Editor. 


West Newton. 


P. 


Boston. 


W. C. 


Newton Centre. Cong. Lib. 


Boston. 


P. c. 


Brookline. 


Asso. P. 


Auburndale. P 


. C Em. 


Auburndle. Sec.N 


D.R.L. 


Needham. 


W. C. 


Wellesley Hills. 


P.C. 


New Platz, N. Y. 


w. c. 


Brockton. 


w. c. 


Fresno, Cal. 


w.c. 


Boston. 


P.C. 


Allston. 


P.C. 


Brookline. 


P.C. 


Boston. 


w.c. 


Boston. Sec'y C. 


C. B. S. 


Allston. 


Asso. P. 


Brighton. 


P. c. 


Melrose Highlands. 


w.c. 


East Boston. 


Miss. 


Auburndale. 


W.C. 


Boston. 


P.C. 


Hancock, _Y . H. 


p. 


Newton Centre. 


P.C. 


Newton. 


p. 


Newtonville. P. C. Em. 


Boston. A. B. 


C. F. M. 


Sharon. 


W. C. 


Newton Highlands 


W.C. 


1 lonhester. 


W. C. 


Boston. 


W.C. 


West Newton. 


P.C. 


Boston. 


Editor. 


Brookline. 


Asst. P. 


Brookline. 


W.C. 


Newton Highlands 


. P.C. 


Worcester. 


w.c. 


Newtonville. 


Sec 'v. 


Newton. 


w. c. 


Boston. 


P.C. 


Auburndale. 


Editor. 


Brookline. 


P. C. 


Newton. 


W.C. 


South Sudbury. 


P. 



Licentiate. — Arthur W. Kelly, Auburndale, license renewed February, 1906, 
for three years. 

Stated Meetings. — Second Wednesdays in February and December, first 
Wednesdays in April and October. 

Rev. Henry E. Oxnard, Newton, scribe and treasurer. 



CO 



Statistics 



[190G 



21. Taunton. 



Members. 
William W. Adams, 
James A. Anderson, 
Abram L. Bean, 
Samuel V. Cole, 
Zenas Crowell, 
James E. Enman, 
Francis A. Fate, 
Avery K. Gleason, ' 
Lincoln B. Goodrich, 
George H. Johnson, 
Payson W. Lyman, ■ 
John J. Macdonald, 
J. Lee Mitchell, 
Frank J. Noyes, 
George H. Perry, 
Edward N. Pomeroy, 
Charles A. Ratcliffe, 
Samuel P. Rondeau, 
Clarence F. Swift, 
Charles H. Talmage, 
Charles L. Tomblen, 
Charles B. Wathen, 
John Whitehall, 

Stated Meetings. 
November. 



Date of 
Ordination. 
'60, Jan. 26. 
'89, Oct. 10. 
'92, Oct. 11. 
'89, Oct. 29. 
'77, Dec. 19. 
'95, Dec. 31. 
'94, Nov. 1. 
'S6, Dec. 14. 
'93, June 29. 
'77, July 6. 
'71, May 10. 
'96, Sept. 9. 
'87, Nov. 11. 
'00, Mar. 20. 
'88, April 7. 
*68, Nov. 11. 
'91, April 26. 
'92, Nov. 22. 
'86, Nov. 4. 
'82, Sept. 18. 
'77, Aug. 30. 
'83, June 14. 
'61, Dec. 11. 



Date of 
Membership. 
'64, Nov. 29. 
'00, Jan. 17. 
'00, Jan. 17. 
'89, Nov. 13. 
'01, Jan. 9. 
'00, Jan. 17. 
'9S, Nov. 9. 
'00, Nov. 14. 
'06, Jan. 17. 
'03, Nov. 11. 
'89, May 8. 
'02, Nov. 12. 
'01, Nov. 13. 
'03, Jan. 14. 
'01, Nov. 13. 
'82, May 10. 
'97, Mar. 10. 
'98, Mar. 9. 
'02, Nov. 12. 
'04, Jan. 13. 
'01, Mar. 20. 
'98, Mar. 9. 
'69, Nov. 10. 



Residence. 
Fall River. 
Somerset. 
Taunton. 
Norton. 
Attleboro Falls, 
Fall River. 
Middlefield. 
Raynham. 
Taunton. 
Taunton. 
Fall River. 
New York. 
Attleboro. 
Dighton. 
Lake vi lie. 
Wellosley. 
Norton. 
Fall River. 
Fall River. 
Taunton. 
North Middleboro. 
Rehoboth. 
Oldtown. 



Employment. 

P.C. 

P. 

P. 

Pres. Sem . 

P. 

P.C. 

w. c. 

F. 
P. C. 

P. 
P.C. 

P. 

P. 

P. 

P. 
W. C. 

P. 
P.C. 
P.C. 
P.C. 
P.C. 

P. 

P. 



Second Wednesdays in January, March, May and 



Rev. Payson W. Lyman, Fall River, scribe and treasurer. 



22. Woburn, Organized September, 1S33. 



Charles Anderson, 


'74, Sept. 2. 


'74, Sept. 15. 


Constantinople. 


Robt. C. 


A. Herbert Armes, 


'89, Dec. 18. 


'99, Oct. 31. 


Carlisle. 


P. 


William F. Bacon, 


'67, Sept. 26. 


'90, Feb. 4. 


Burlington. 


P. 


Henry A. Barber, 


'03, Aug. 22. 


'05, Nov. 21. 


Maiden. 


Asst. P. 


William J. Batt, 


'59, Sept. 29. 


'59, Nov. 15. 


Concord June. 


Chaplain. 


Theodore P. Berle, 


'93, Oct. 3. 


'93, Oct. 17. 


Cambridge. 


W. C. 


George M. Butler, 


'02, June 30. 


'04, Nov. 15 


Medford. 


P. C. 


Wolcott Calkins, 


'62, Oct. 22. 


'98, Nov. 15 


Newton. 


p. 


Charles F. Carter, 


'S3, Sept. 13. 


'96, April 15 


Lexington. 


P.C. 


Joshua Coit, 


'60, Nov. 13. 


'S9, Jan. 29. 


Winchester.Treas.M.H.M.S 


Eugene E. Colburn, 


'75, Sept. 18. 


'97, Nov. 9. 


Wells, Me. 


p 


Marshall M. Cutter, 


'68, Dec. 29. 


'74, Nov. 17 


Boston. 


W. C 


Albert P. Davis, 


'94, Nov. 22. 


'95, Feb. 19. 


West Roxbury. 


W. C 


B. Alfred Dumm, 


'91, June 4. 


'01, Nov. 19 


Stoneham. 


P.C 


Walter A. Evans, 


'S6, June 29. 


'95, Dec. 17. 


Plain field. III. 


w. c. 


James L. Fowle, 


*7S, Julv3. 


'98, Nov. 15 


Turkey. 


F.M 


Henry H. French, 


'86, April 25. 


'97, Nov. 9. 


Maiden. 


P.C 


Robert W. Haskins, 


'72, Oct. 19. 


'97, Nov. 9. 


Reading. 


W. C 


James L. Hill, 


'75, Sept, 15. 


'87, June 3. 


Salem. 


w. c 


John H. Hoffman, 


'77, Aug. 21. 


'01, Nov. 19 


North Reading. 


p 


Frank S. Hunnewell, 


'88, June 27. 


'99, Feb. 21. 


Reading. 


P.C 


Burke F. Leavitt, 


'73, May 7. 


'95, Jan. 29. 


Belmont. 


p 


George E. Lovejoy, 


'73, July 16. 


'77, Sept. 16 


Lawrence. 


P.C 


Thomas MacBriar, 


'90, Jan. 15. 


'98, Oct. 12. 


Brookline. 


w. c. 


Charles S. Macfarland, 


'97, Nov. 3. 


'02, June 3. 


So. Norfolk, Conn. ' 


Daniel March, 


'45, April 25. 


'56, Nov. 18. 


Woburn. 


P. C. Em 


Truman A. Merrill, 


'58, July 14. 


'98, Oct. 12. 


Maiden. 


W. C 



1906] 



Ministerial Standing 



01 



22. Woburn" {Continued). 



Members. 
Robert D. Miller, 
D. Augustine Newton, 
Stephen A. Norton, 
Aaron B. Peffers, 
Isaac Pierson, 
Walter H. Rollins, 
Charles Scott, 
Thomas Sims, 
Azro A. Smith, 
George H. Tilton, 
David C. Torrey, 
Joshua W. Wellman, 
Burt L. Yorke, 



Date of 
Ordination. 
'56, Julv 2. 
*S2, Sept. 21. 
'81, Oct. 6. 
'oo, Mav 29. 
70, Mar. 30. 
'98, Aug. 26. 
'54, Dec. 27. 
'75, June 9. 
'64, Feb. 11. 
'73, June 4. 
'92, June 1. 
'51, June IS. 
'99, June 15. 



Date of 
Membership. 
'97, Nov. 9. 
'85, Dec. 16. 
'02, Nov. 18. 
'04, June 21. 
'96, Oct. 8. 
'01, Nov. 19. 
'01, Nov. 19. 
'97, Nov. 9. 
'00, June 5. 
'97, Nov. 9. 
'05, Feb. 21. 
'74, Mar. 17. 
'04, June 21. 



Residence. 
Maiden. 
Winchester. 
Woburn. 
Stoneham. 
Wellesley Hills 
Wilmington. 
Reading. 
Melrose. 
Reading. 
Woburn . 
Bedford. 
Maiden. 
West Medford. 



Employment. 

w. c. 
P. c. 
P. c. 
w. c. 

Sec 'v. 
P.C. 

w. c. 

P.C. 

w. c. 

P.C. 

P. 

w. c. 

P.C. 



Licentiate. — Albert V. Fisher, licensed February 20, 1906, for two years. 

Stated Meetings. — Third Tuesdays in February, May, September and 
November. 

Rev. B. Alfred Durum, Stoneham, scribe and treasurer. 



23. Worcester Central, Organized November 4, 1823. 



Thomas E. Babb, 
Hachidoor G. Benneyan, 
Osmond J. Billings, 
Charles M. Carpenter, 
Andrew B. Chalmers, 
Amos H. Coolidge, 
Samuel B. Cooper, 
Frank Crane, 
Joseph W. Cross, 
William N. T. Dean, 
Austin Dodge, 
George S. Dodge, 
John E. Dodge, 
Percy H. Epler, 
J. Lewis Evans, 
Henry C. Fay, 
Walcott Fay, 
D wight Goddard, 
Albert W. Hitchcock, 
Albert V. House, 
William W. Jordan, 
Alexander Lewis, 
Joseph F. Lovering, 
Garabf>d M. Manavian, 
John H. Matthews, 
Archibald McCullagh, 
Daniel Merriman, 
Lyman Mevis, 
Peter A. Mickels, 
Clifton H. Mix, 
Eldridge Mix, 
Ellsworth W. Phillips, 
Charles M. Pierce, 
George H. Pratt, 
Willard Scott, 



'69, Jan. 19. 
'02, Dec. 1. 
'05, Oct. 4. 
'90, April 22. 
'90, Sept. 7. 
'57, April 21. 
'87, Jan. 19. 
'84, Sept. 21. 
'34, Oct. 1. 
'75, Feb. 3. 
'66, Oct. 6. 
'72, Aug. 16. 
'83, Sept. 25. 
'98, Mav 2S. 
'85, July 2. 
'5S, Dec. 28. 
'84, Feb. 20. 
'94, Julv 17. 
'91, Dec. 15. 
'94, June 20. 
'84, Oct. 9. 
'90, May 2S. 
'60, June 17. 
'98, Mav 31. 
'91, May 5. 
"71, May 2. 
'68, Sept. 30. 
'91, Oct. 1. 
'00, May 10. 
'02, Mav 2S. 
'60, Dec. 6. 
'91, Oct. 19. 
'63, Sept. 2. 
'60, Oct. 11. 
'79, Oct. 29. 



'94, April 3. 
'02, Nov. 11. 
'06, Feb. 6. 
'01, April 9. 
'04, Feb. 9. 
'67, July 7. 
'99, Feb. 7. 
'03, April 14. 
'41, Jan. 5. 
'89, Feb. 5. 
'90, Feb. 4. 
'78, May 7. 
'84, Feb. 5. 
'06, Feb. 6. 
'04, Nov. 8. 
'81, May 2. 
'90, Feb. 4. 
'00, Nov. 13. 
'01, April 9. 
'05, Nov. 14. 
'94, Nov. 13. 
'96, April 7. 
'S8, April 3. 
'05. Jan. 31. 
'97, Nov. 9. 
'91, April 27. 
'78, Nov. 12. 
'01, April 9. 
'04. Feb. 9. 
'06, Feb. 6. 
'94, April 3. 
'92, Feb. 9. 
'91, Feb. 3. 
'94, Nov. 13. 
'99, Feb. 7. 



Holden. 


P 


St. Louis. 


1' 


Worcester. 


P 


Oxford. 


P 


Worcester. 


PC 


Worcester. 


w.c 


North Brookfield. 


P.C 


Worcester. 


P.C 


Worcester. 


w. c 


Whately. 


p 


Lyndeboro, N. H. 


p. 


Boylston Center. 


p 


West Bovlston. 


p 


Worcester. 


P.C 


Auburn. 


p 


Lexington. 


w.c 


Nantucket. 


w.c 


Cleveland, Ohio. 


w.c 


Worcester. 


P.C. 


Worcester. 


P.C 


Clinton. 


P. c 


Kansas City, Mo. 


p. 


Somerville. 


w.c. 


Worcester. 


p. 


Worcester. 


p. 


Worcester. 


w.c. 


Worcester. P 


C. Em. 


Cotuit. 


P. 


Worcester. 


P. 


Worcester. 


P.C. 


Worcester. 


CM. 


Worcester. 


P.C. 


Worcester. 


W.C. 


Paxton. 


p. 


Worcester. 


p. c. 



62 



Statistics 



[1906 



23. Worcester Central (Continued). 





Date of 


Date of 






Members. 


Ordination. 


Membership. 


Residence. Employment 


Arthur H. Sedgwick, 


'90, Nov. 11. 


'01, April 9. 


Shrewsbury. 


P. 


J. Addison Seibert, 


'94, July 19. 


'01, Nov. 12. 


Kansas City, Kan 


W. C 


Henry D. Sleeper, 


'91, Nov. 


'01, April 9. 


Northampton. 


Teacher 


James A. Solandt, 


'94. July 3. 


'05, April 4. 


Rutland. 


P 


Rufus M. Taft, 


'93, June 16. 


'94, Feb. 6. 


Worcester. 


Evan 


J. Brainard Thrall, 


78, Dec. 


'05, April 4. 


Leicester. 


P. C. 


Albert G. Todd, 


'90, June 10. 


'97, Feb. 15. 


Worcester. 


P. 


Charles B. Toleman, 


'97, Oct. 20. 


'02, April 8. 


Sterling. 


P. 


John E. Tuttle, 


'83, May 22. 


'97, Nov. 9. 


Lincoln, Neb. 


P 


Francis J. Van Horn, 


'93, Dec. 5. 


'03, Nov. 10 


Seattle, Wash. 


P. 


John Udd, 


'96, July 2. 


'98, Nov. 15. 


Cambridge. 


W. C. 


Charles A. White, 


'73, Sept. 3. 


'96, Nov. 10 


Woonsocket, R. I. 


w. c. 


Charles E. White, 


'00, Nov. 6. 


'04, Nov. 8. 


Amherst, N. H. 


p. 


Inman L. Willcox, 


'89, Oct. 18. 


'90, Feb. 4. 


Worcester. 


P. c. 



Stated Meetings. — First Tuesdays in February and April and second Tues- 
days In November and June. 



Rev. Inman L. Willcox, 138 Elm Street, Worcester, scribe. 



24. Worcester North, Organized June IS, 1818. 



James A. Bates, 
Preston R. Crowell, 
Nathan T. Dyer, 
Francis J. Fairbanks, 
Robert J. Floody, 
Burton S. Gilman, 
Milan H. Hitchcock, 
Gustavus W. Jones, 
Gabriel B. Kambour, 
Francis B. Knowlton, 
John W. Lees, 
Charles C. Merrill, 
John L. Merrill, 
Egbert N. Munro, 
William L. Muttart, 
Richard Peters, 
George J. Pierce, 



'60, Sept. 19. 
'90, Sept. 4. 
'7S, July 31. 
'64, Aug. 31. 
'87, Sept. 7. 
'97, May 16. 
'57, Aug. 25. 
'69, May 27. 
'93, April 5. 
'65, Aug. 29. 
'70, Nov. 16. 
'97. Oct, 12. 
'60, Oct. 31. 
'81.Mav4. 
'94, Julv 11. 
'00, June 29. 
'72, Aug. S. 



'99, April 25. 
'9S, Julv 12. 
'05, April 25 
'95, July 9. 
'98, April 26. 
'97, April 26, 
'63, April 2S 
'91, April 2S. 
'93, April 25 
'86, Jan. 26. 
'96, April 28. 
'02, July 2. 
'04, Jan. 26. 
'04, Jan. 26. 
'06, Jan. 23. 
'04, Sept. 24. 
'82, April 25. 



South Royalston. 

Petersham. 

Ashhurnham. 

Royalston. 

Worcester. 

Gardner. 

Winchendon. 

Winchendon. 

Colebrook, N. H. 

Athol. 

Westminster. 

Winchendon. 

Winchendon. 

West Stafford, Conn. 

Phillipston. 

Baldwin ville. 

Worcester. 



P. 

P. 

P. 

P. C. 

w. c. 

P. c. 
w. c. 

P. c. 
p. 



w 



Stated Meetings. — Fourth Tuesdays in January and April, second Tuesday 
in July and last Tuesday in September. 

Rev. Richard Peters, Baldwinville, scribe. 



25. Worcester South, Organized 



ISIS. 



Edward B. Blanchard, 
Andrew Campbell, 
James H. Childs, 
Charles M. Crooks, 
David M. Didriksen, 
Gro%-e F. Ekins, 
John C. Hall, 



'92, June 29. '05, Dec. 12. East Douglas. P. 

'96, Sept. 24. '00, Jan. 19. Webster. P. 

'75, Oct. 7. '85, Jan. 13. Northbridge Centre. P. 

'97, Feb. 2. '05, Mar. 14. Saundersville. P. C. 

'92, July 13. '92, Oct. 11. Roxbury. W. C. 

'04, Dec. 6. '05, Feb. 14. Millburv. P. C. 

'90, May 20. '92, Jan. 12. Sturbridge. P. 



1906] 



Ministerial Standing 



(',:> 



24. Worcester South (Continued). 





Date of 


Dale of 






Members. 


Ordination. 


Membership. 


Residence. 


Employment 


Samuel A. Harlow, 


'82, Oct. 15. 


'03, June 16 


Grafton. 


P. C 


David Howie, 


'89, Feb. 27. 


'94, Oct. 9. 


Hopedale. 


P. 


Dorrall Lee, 


'94, Sept. 16. 


'05, Feb. 14. 


Blackstone. 


P. 


Frank A. Lombard, 


'00, Aug. 9. 


'00, Sept. 11 


Kioto. 


A. B. C. F. M. 


George A. Putnam, 


'60, Nov. 14. 


71, Oct. 17. 


Millbury. 


P. C 


John R. Thurston, 


'59, Jan. 20. 


72, Jan. 9. 


Whitinsville 


P. C 


John J. Walker, 


'94, Dec. 11. 


'03, Dec. 15. 


Westboro. 


P.O. 


Alexander Wiswall, 


79, Sept. 24. 


'94, Jan. 9. 


Uxbridge. 


P 



Stated Meetings. — Second Tuesdays in March, June, September 
cember. 

Rev. James H. Childs, Northbridge Center, scribe. 



ASSOCIATIONS OF MINISTERS.* 

Brookfield, Organized June 22, 1757. 

Stated Meetings. — Second Tuesdays in January, April, July and October. 

Rev. Samuel B. Cooper, North Brookfield, scribe. 

Cape Cod (Barnstable, 1792; Brewster, 1832; Vineyard Sound, 1S36\ 
Organized by Union, October 16, 1866. 

Stated Meetings. — Third Tuesdays in January, April, July and October. 
Rev. Sidney Crawford, Provincetown, scribe. 

Essex North, Organized September 6, 1761. 

Stated Meetings. — Third Tuesdays in February, April, June, October and 
December. 

Rev. George P. Merrill, Newburyport, scribe. 

Franklin, Organized September 20, 1S03. 

Stated Meetings. — Second Tuesdays in February, May, September and 
November. 

Rev. Frank W. Merriam, Turners Falls, scribe. 

Hampshire East, Organized November 16, 1841. 

Licentiates, — Edward P. Cro well, Amherst, re-licensed Feb. 6, 1906; William 
L. Montague, Amherst, re-licensed February 3, 1903; Levi H. Elwell, Amherst, 
re-licensed December 6, 1904; Alfred J. Sadler, licensed March 15, 1904. 

Term of licensure is four years. 

Stated Meetings. — First Tuesdays in February, June and December, and 
third Tuesday in September. 

Rev. John P. Maxwell, North Amherst, scribe. 

Middlesex South, Organized June 7, 1830. 

Licentiate. — Charles P. Holbrook, licensed February 7, 190.5, for three years. 
Stated Meetings. — First Tuesdays in February, May and December, and 
third Tuesday in September. 

Rev. Daniel E. Adams, Wellesley Hills, scribe. 

* These Associations do not guard ministerial standing. 



MINISTERIAL RECORD FOR 1905-1906 



Ordinations, Installations and Recognitions 

In this list " o." denotes ordination without installation; " i.," installation; 
o. i.," ordained and installed; " r. p.," recognition as pastor. But owing to 
1 definite reports, " o." may sometimes be an error for " o. i." 
Beers, Robert W., i., Broadway ch., Somerville, Nov. 22, 1905. 
Billings, Osmond J., o., Sharon, Oct. 4, 1905. 
Bryant, Charles M., o., White Oaks, April 13, 1906. 
Burrill, George H., ?'., First ch., East Hampton, April 26, 1905. 
Clark, Charles, %., Millers Falls, June 29, 1905. 
Clements, Arthur, o., Southfield, Sept. 13, 1905. 
Conrad, Arcturus Z., i., Park St. ch., Boston, Jan. IS, 1906. 
Cummings, Arthur G., o., First ch., Middleboro, Nov. 22, 1905. 
Davis, Ernest C, i., Riverside ch., Haverhill, May 24, 1905. 
Dodge, Roland B., o„ West Bovlston, June 20, 1905. 
Dunnels, A. Frederick, i., Highland ch., Lowell, April IS, 1906. 
Emrich R. Stanley, o. f. m., South Framingham, June 12, 1905. 
Epler, Percy H., %., Adams Sq. ch., Worcester, Oct. 10, 1905. 
Goodrich, Lincoln B., i Trinitarian ch., Taunton, Dec. 12, 1905. 
. Greeley, Leslie C, i., Whitefield ch., Newbuiyport, Nov. 2, 1905. 
Harald, J. Valdemar, o., Quincv, Sept. 17, 1905. 
Holbrook, Charles P., o. i., Marshfield Hills. June 15, 1905. 
Holton, Horace F., o., Springfield, June 20, 1905. 
Hyde, Albert M., i., Porter ch., Brockton, Dec. 12, 1905. 
Keedy, John L., i., North Andover, April 1, 1905. 
Kennedy, Daniel R., o. i., Needham, Oct. 17, 1905. 
Libby, Frederick J., o. i.. Magnolia, May 24, 1905. 
Lincoln, Clarence A., o. i., Manchester, June 9, 1905. 
McKinnon, Norman, i., Cliftondale, Oct. 26, 1905. 
Merrill, George P., ;'., Prospect St. ch., Newburvport, April 3, 1905. 
Mix, Clifton H., i., Pilgrim ch., Worcester. March S, 1906. 
Moore, John K., i., Orange, Jan. 17, 1906. 
Nicholls, Jesse G., i., South Hadlev, April 17, 1906. 
Paislev, John O., i., Holbrook, May 10, 1905. 
Parker, Charles O., r. p., Berlin, March 7, 1905. 
Richards, Frederick B., i., Phillips ch., Boston. Nov. 2, 1905. 
Rockwell, William W., o., Andover, June 5, 1905. 
Stocking, Jav T., i., Newtonville, Nov. 14, 1905. 
Truesdale, Arthur L., o., Wendell, Sept. 26. 1905. 
Vauthier, Leon P. F., o. i., St. John's ch., Haverhill, Dec. 5, 1905. 
Williams, Charles H., %., Trinitv ch., Gloucester, Nov. 9, 1905. 
Willmott, Benjamin A., o., First ch., Lowell. March 22, 1906. 
Zellars, Edwin G., i., Spencer, June 6, 1905. 

Dismissions 
Alger, Frank G., Whitefield ch., Newburvport, June 5, 1905. 
Austin, Leon H., Washington St. ch., Quincv, Oct. 3, 1905. 
Bassett, Austin B., East ch., Ware, June 20, 1905. 



1906] Ministerial Record for 1905-1906 65 

Bliss, Leon D., Great Barrington, Nov. 27, 1905. 

Collier, Christopher W., Orange, June 14, 1905. 

Davis, Albert P., Wakefield, June 29, 1905. 

Dunnels, A. Frederick, Calvinistic ch., Fitchburg, Dec. 28, 1905. 

Fate, Francis A., Trinitarian ch., Taunton, May 8, 1905. 

Francis, Everett D., First ch., Ludlow, June 10, 1905. 

Fraser, David, Rowley, May 23, 1905. 

Gleason, George L., Fourth" ch., Haverhill, April 18, 1905. . 

Goodacre, James J., Winthrop, Jan. 25, 1906. 

Goodrich, Lincoln B., Union ch., Marlboro, Nov. 14, 1905. 

Harrington, Charles E., Waltham, Sept. 28, 1905. 

Hibbard, Rufus P., Trinitv ch., Gloucester, Nov. 9, 1905. 

Hubbard, Charles L., West Boxford, Sept. 27, 1905. 

Huntington, Charles W\, High St. ch., Lowell, Sept. 26, 1905. 

Keedv, John L., Walpole, March 27, 1905. 

Leavitt, Burke F., Melrose Highlands, March 29, 1905. 

Leavitt, Horace H., Broadway ch., Somerville, June 20, 1905. 

Lindstrom, Gustaf, Swedish ch., Springfield, April 23, 1906. 

Lovell, Charles N., Southwick, Oct. 23, 1905. 

Mix, Clifton H., Cliftondale, Feb. 22, 1905. 

Nicholls, Jesse G., Hamilton, Jan. 10, 1906. 

Oleson, William B., Warren, Jan. 1, 1906. 

Patton, Myron O., Palmer, Sept. 19, 1905. 

Porter, Edward C, Watertown, Julv 5, 1905. 

Pratt, Arthur P., Third ch., Chelsea, June 23, 1905. 

Southgate, Charles M., Auburndale, June 16, 1905. 

Stackpole, Markham W., Magnolia, May 24, 1905. 

Stearns, George W., First ch., Middleboro, Nov. 13, 1905. 

Smart, I. Chipman, South ch., Pittsfield, Jan. 8, 1906. 

Young, James C, Baker ch., Boston, Oct. 16, 1905. 

Deaths 
Adams, George M., w. c, Auburndale, Jan. 13, 1906. 
Aldrich, Jeremiah K., w. c, Boston, Aug. 3, 1905. 
Bixby, Josiah P., w. c, Revere, April 18, 1906. 
Carruthers, William, c. m., Fairhaven, Aug. 11, 1905. 
Cobb, Levi H., w. c, Mavnard, Feb. 5, 1906. 
Cote, Thomas G. A., p. c. em., Lowell, April 27, 1906. 
Davis, William H., p. c, Newton, June 7, 1905. 
Gaylord, Joseph F., w. c, Worcester, April 10, 1905. 
Harlow, Rufus K, p. c. em., Medway, Dec. 14, 1905. 
Haskell, William H., w. c, Auburndale, June 11, 1905. 
Hazen, Timothy A., w. c, Soringfield, Julv 16, 1905. 
Porter, Elbert S., p. c, Stockbridge, April 18, 1906. 

Marriages 
Butterfield, Claude A., of Ludlow, and Nettie M. Ho wells, of Cleveland, 

Ohio, Aug. 9, 1905. 
Park, J. Edgar, of Andover, and Grace L. Burtt, April 28, 1906. 
Pratt, D. Butler, of Springfield, and Abrota S. Cadwell, of Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Sept. 26, 1906. 
Thomas, Reuen, of Brookline, and Lydia Cotton, Oct. 24, 1905. 
Voorhees, J. Spencer, of Adams, and Elizabeth Warner, of Salisbury, Conn., 

Sept. 14, 1905. 



DONATIONS TO THE MASSACHUSETTS AND AMERICAN 
BIBLE SOCIETIES 



Amherst, First, $27; Ashby, S7; Belehertown, S7; Beverly, 
Washington Street, $7; Blandford, First, $10; Boston, Allston, 814, 
Dorchester, Second, $85, Dorchester, Pilgrim, $34; Brockton, South, 
$14, Porter, $15, Wendell Avenue, $3; Bridgewater, $5; Cambridge, 
Hope, $11; Chelsea, First, $24, Central, $5; Chicopee, First, $5, 
Falls, $12; Cohasset, $10; Dalton, $107; Dedham, $27; Dunstable, 
$30; East Bridgewater, $6; East Longmeadow, $5; Fairhaven, S3; 
Fall River, First, $10; Falmouth, First, $11; Fitchburg, Rollstone, 
$13; Framingham, Plymouth, $53; Georgetown, First, $15; Hard- 
wick, Gilbertville, $7; Hatfield, $16; Hinsdale, S2; Holbrook, 86; 
Holliston, $9; Holyoke, First, $13; Hudson, $4; Hyde Park, First, 
$26; Lee, $40; Leicester, $5; Lexington, $10; Lowell, First Trini- 
tarian, 810, Kirk Street, $13; Lynn, Central, $3; Maiden, First, 831; 
Medway, Village, $10; Melrose Highlands, $4; Merrimae, 812; 
Middleboro, First, $6; Millbury, Second, $17; Montague, $2; Turners 
Falls, $24; Newton, First, $15, Auburndale, $52, Eliot, $51 ; North- 
ampton, Florence, $21; Northboro, $4; Northfield, $11; Pittsfield, 
South, $14; Plymouth, Pilgrimage, $2; Princeton, $7; Reading, 
820; Rowley, $12; Shelburne, $9, Falls, $26; Springfield, First, $5, 
North, $8, Park, $3; Sudbury, $5; Taunton, Winslow, $5; Wake- 
field, $5; Ware, $13; Warren," $8; Wellesley, $23, Hills, $11; West 
Brookfield, $10; Westford, $10; Westport, [$10; Whitman, $21; 
Williamstown, First, $5; Winchendon, North, $9; Winchester, 
First, $9; Woburn, First, $21 ; Worcester, Old South, $45, Union, SI, 
Piedmont, $5. 



CONGREGATIONAL MINISTERS IN MASSACHUSETTS 



This list gives the names of pastors, or acting pastors, and members of 
Ministerial Associations who have been ordained, and Congregational ministers 
resident in Massachusetts. 

Ministers who are not reported as having ministerial standing in this state, 
and who have not been installed by council, are designated by a star (*). 

The first column of figures gives the page on which names may be found of all in 
pastoral service. A blank in the first column signifies that the person is not reported 
as being in pastoral service in this state. 

The second column of figures gives the page on which ministerial standing is 
recorded, or the year of ordination. If the date alone is given it signifies that 
the person is not a member of any Association in this state. 

The post-office addresses as given below often differ from the places named in the 
tables, and are supposed to be correct in this list. 

An alphabetical list of licentiates follows this list. 

SPECIAL NOTICE — If your name is not correctly printed in the preceding 
tables, if one Christian name is not given in full, if your ordination is not correct, 
or is not in its proper place, if your post-office is wrong, or if before you receive the 
next Year-Book your post-office is changed, or if your name is omitted from this 
list, the needed change or correction should be reported at once to the Rev. C. G. 
Burnham, Chicopee, Mass., Secretary of the General Association of Massachusetts. 



Statistic? 
Aberorombie, Ralph H., Windsor, 30, 
Adadourian, Haig. West Tisbury, 30, 55 
Adams, Daniel E., Wellcsley Hills, 52 

Adams, Harry C, Danvers Center, 8, 55 
Adams, William W., Fall River, 10, CO 

Adkins, James B., Belchertown, 4. 51 

Adriance, S. Winchester, Winchester, 1ST9 
Ainsworth, Israel, Rockport, 24, 55 

*Akeson, Ludwig, Worcester, 32, 

Alcott, William P., Boxford, 14, 55 

Alger, Frank G., Cambridge, 49 

Allbright, William H„ Dorchester, 4, 58 
Allen, Fred. H., New York, 54 

Allen, Garrett L., West Steimrtstown, 

N. H., 59 

Allen, Herbert M., Constantinople, 

Turkey, 59 

Allen, Melvin J., Southwick, 26, 51 

Allen, Orson P., Constantinople, 

Turkey, 59 

Alvord, Henry C, So. Weymouth, 30, 54 
*Ander, Ernest G., North Easton, 10, 
Anderson, Asher, Cambridge, 56 

Anderson, August L., New York, 

N. Y., 54 

*Anderson, Carl J., Orange, 22, 

Anderson, Charles. Constantinople, 60 

Anderson, Edward, Quincy, 18, 54 

*Anderson, George S., Somerville, 26, 
Anderson, James A., Somerset, 26, 60 

♦Anderson, Jonas, Quincy, 24, 

Anderson, Milledge T., Rockland, R. 

F. D. 1, 12, 55 



Statistics 
*Anderson, William S., Moores Cor- 
ner, 1 
Andrews, George A., HollUton, 14, 
Andrews, George W., Dalton, 8, 
Andrus, J. Cowles, Enfield. 10, 
Archibald, Andrew W., Nev.- Haven, 

Conn., 
Armes, A. Herbert, Carlisle, 8, 

Arnold, William R., Andover. 
Atherton, D. Frank, A\ atertown, 
Atwood, Alfred Ray, Quincy, 24 

Atwood, Lewis P.. So. Weymouth, 



Babb. Ttiomas E., Holden, 
*Bacon, Leonard W., Assonet, 
Bacon, Wiliiam F ., Medford. 
Bailey, Henry L., Longmeadow, 
Baker, Ernest L., No. Weare. N. H. 
Baker. T. Nelson, Pittsfield, 
*Ballantine, John W., Huntington, 14 
Ballantine, William G.. Springheld 
Barker, Franklin W .. An esburv, 
Barker, Herbert A., Jamoica Plain, 
Barnes, Henry E.. Brookline, 
Barrett, S. Allen, Florence, 
Barrow, Edward F.. Amherst. 
Bartlett, Ernest C, Philadelph 

Pa., 
Bartlett, Lyman, Springfield, 
Barton, James L.. Newton Center, 
Bascom, John, Williamstown. 
Bassett, Austin B., Hartford, Conn. 



a 


60 


16 


,iii 




46 


22 


47 


14 






,-,o 


't 


4K 


6 


5K 




,-,.S 


20, 


."I 



C.S 



Statistics 



[1906 



Statistics 

Bates, Charles S., West Barnstable, 2, 47 

Rates, James A., So. Kovalston, 62 

Batt, William J., Concord Junction, 60 

Beale, William T., Dorchester, 6, 58 

Beals, Charles E., Cambridge, 6, 56 

Bean, Abram L., Taunton, 28, 60 

Beard, Reuben A., Cambridge, 56 

Beers, Robert W., Somerville, 26, 56 

Bell, Robert C.Granbv, 12, 51 

Benedict, George, North Abington, 2, 54 
Bennevan, Hachidoor G., St. Louis, 

Mo., 61 
Berle, Adolph A., Salem, 24, 55 
Berle, Theodore P., Cambridge, 61 
Berry, James T., Conway, 8, 53 
Biekford, Thomas. St. mghton, 26, 54 
Bickford, Warren F., Muscogee, I.T., 58 
Hi.lwell, Charles A., Brookline, 59 
Bigelow, E. Victor, Lowell, 16, 46 
Billings, Osmond J., Worcester, 32, 61 
Bissell. Oscar C, HoUand. 48 
Blair, John J., Springfield, 46 
RI:ik.<-U-e. l.iastus, Brookline, 59 
Blanchard, Edgar F., Paterson, N. J., 49 
Blanchard, Edward B., East Doug- 
las, ■ 10, 62 
Bliss, Charles B., Hampden, 12, 50 
Bliss, Daniel, Beirut, Syria, 51 
Bhss, Leon D., Pittsfield, 48 
Bolster, Frelon E., Sheffield, 24, 48 
Bourne, Alexander P., Cambridge, 6, 56 
Bowden, Henry M., Chester, R. F. 

D., 10, 48 
Bowman, John Eliot, Jamaica, Vt., 51 
Boynton, Francis H., Florence, 51 
Boynton, George M., Newton Centre, 58 
Bradford, Emery L., East Wey- 
mouth, 30, 55 
Bradford, Park A., Danby, Vt., 46 
Bradley, Edward E., Lincoln, 16, 52 
*Braithwaite, Edward E., 37 W T alden 

St., Cambridge, 26, 

Brand, Charles A.. Boston, 1898 

Bray, Henry E., East Taunton, 28, 

Breck, Charles A., Methuen, 47 
*Brewer, Frank S., Palmer, 22, 

Briant, S. Ingersoll, Westboro, 52 

Brickett, Harry L., Marion, 18, 55 

Bridgman, Howard A., Brookline, 57 

Brodie, James F., Nashville. Tenn., 55 
Bronsdon, Allen A., North Attle- 

boro. 20, 48 
Brooks, Charles S., Wellesley, 52 
Brooks, G. Wolcott, Dorchester. 4, 57 
Brown, Samuel A., Boston, 6, 58 
Brownville, John W., West Glouces- 
ter, 12, 55 
Bruce, Henry J., Satara, India, 50 
♦Bryant, Charles M . Williamstown, 30, 
Bryant, Seelye, Middlefield, 18, 47 
Buck, George H., Crown Point, N. Y., 51 
Burnham, Collins G., Chicopee, 8, 50 
Burr. Hanford M., Springfield, 50 
Burrill, Arthur S., Nahant, 18, 55 
Burrill, George H., Easthampton, 10, 51 
Burrows, Frederick W., Braintree, 54 
Busfield, Theodore E., North 



Adams, 
hnell. Sar 
Butler, Edward P.. Sunderland, 
Butler, Frank E.. So. Hadley Falls 
Butler, George M., Medford, 
Butler, W'illis H., Northampton, 



20. 



57 



Statist 
Butterfield. Claude A., Ludlow, 
Buxton, WiLson R., Millis, 
Byington, Edwin H., Beverly, 
Byington, George P., Winsted, Conn., 
Calkins, Wolcott, Newton, 
Camp, Edward C, Watertown, 
Campbell, Andrew, Webster, 
Campbell, Walter W., Concord, 
Campbell, William R., Roxbury, 
Carpenter, Charles C, Andover, 
Carpenter, Charles M., Oxford, 
Carruthers, John B., So. Deerfield, 
Carter, Charles F., Lexington, 
Carter, Clark, Lawrence, 
Cate. George H., West Newton, 
Cathcart, Samuel M., Middleboro, 
Chafer, Louis S., Northfield, 
Chalmers, Andrew B., Worcester, 
♦Chalmers, James, Fitchburg, 
Chandler, Edward H., Salem, 
Chapin, Charles H„ New Salem, 
Chapin, George E., West Newbury, 

Vt., 
Charron, Charles L., Springfield, 
Chase, Edward A., Wollaston, 
Childs, James H., Northbridge Cen- 
ter, 
Childs, Truman D.. Rochester, 
M'hri^ie. George W., Berkley, 
Chute, Edward L., Ware, 
Clancey, William P., Northampton, 
Clark, Calvin M., Haverhill, 
Clark, Charles. Millers Falls, 
Clark, Daniel W., Ashland, 
Clark, DeWitt S.. Salem, 
Clark, Edson L., Dalton, 
Clark, Edward L., Boston, 
Clark, Francis F... Auburndale, 
Clark, Frank G., Wellesley, 
Clarke, Charles F.. Mayville, N. D., 
Clayton, Francis T., Williamstown, 
Clements, Arthur, Southfield, 
Cobb, ElishaG., Northampton, 
Cobb, William H., Newton Center, 
Cochrane, Robert H., Weymouth, 
Coit, Joshua, Winchester, 
Colburn, Eugene E., Wells, Me., 
Cole, Samuel V., Norton, 
Colton, Alfred E., Dorchester, 
Conrad, Arcturus Z., Boston, 
Conrad, William O., Fitchburg, 
Constant, Edward, Ipswich, 
Cook, Silas P., Pittsfield, 
Coolidge, Amos H., Worcester, 
Coolidge, Henry A., West Gran- 
ville. 
Cooper, Samuel B., North Brookfield, 
Copping. Bernard, Stratham, N. H., 
Covell, Arthur J., Lynn, 
Cowan, John, Lyme, N . H., 
Crafts, Daniel I... Stratham, N. H., 
Crane, Frank, Worcester, 
Crathern. C. F. Hill. South Braintree, 
Crasvford. Sidney, Provincetown, 
Credeford, George H., Sandwich, 
Crooks, Charles M.. Saundersville, 
Crosby, John F., Dover, N. H., 
Cross, Allen E., Brookline, 
Cross, Joseph W., Worcester, 
Crowell, Preston R., Petersham, 
Crowell, Zenas, Attleboro Falls, 
Cummings. Arthur G., Middleboro. 
♦Curtis, Gilbert A., Chester, R. F. D., 



It'. 


50 


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56 




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32 


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50 

58 


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4, 

28, 


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48 



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1906] 



Names of Ministers 



Curtis, 'W alter W., West Stockbridge,30, 48 
Cutler, Calvin, Auburndale, 20, 59 

Cutler, Frederick M., Edgartown, 10, 55 
Cutler, Temple, Ipswich, 56 

Cutter, Marshall M., Boston, 60 

Dale, John H., Billerica, 4, 46 

Daniels, Charles H., So. Framing- 
ham, 12, 52 
*Davies, Thomas M., Manomet, 22, 
Davis, Albert P., West Koxbury, 60 
Davis, Ernest C, Lawrence, 16, 46 
Davis, Perley B., West Roxbury, 58 
Davis, Wm. V. W.. Pittsfield, 22, 47 
Davison, Thomas W., Springfield, 26, 50 
Day, Charles O., Andover, 46 
Dean, Tee M., Westbrook, Me., 48 
Dean, William N. T., Whately, 30, 61 
DeBarritt, Alfred, Cienjuegos, Cuba, 55 
DeBerry, William N., Springfield, 26, 50 
Dechman, Arthur, Groveland. 12, 48 
Deming, Vernon H., North Wilbra- 

ham, 30, 50 

Denison, John H., Williamstown, 47 

Denison, John H., Boston, 4. 

Detling, William C, Sylvan ia, Ohio, 
Dexter, Morton, Boston, 
Dickinson, Charles A., Sacramento 

Cat, 
Dickinson, George L., Prescott, 
Dickinson, George R., Zanesville, 0., 
I iii Ink -i'n, David M., Roxbury, 
Dike, Samuel W., Auburndale. 
Dingivell, James D., Amesbury, 
Dixon, Sarah A., Lowell, 
Dodd, Leonard, Nashua, N. H., 
Dodge, Austin, Lyndeboro, N. H., 



Dooley, John, Monterey, 
Dornan, William W., Plymouth, 
Dougherty, M. Angelo, Cambridge, 
Dowden, William H., Hanover, 
Drawbridge, Robert W., Medway, 
Drew, Edward P., Roxbury, 
Dugan, William R., Montague, 
Dumm, B. Alfred, Stoneham, 
Dunbar, Robert W„ Haverhill, 
Dunnels, A. Frederick, Lowell, 
Dunning, Albert E., Brookline, 
Dutton, Horace, Auburndale, 
Dwight, Charles A. D., Winchester, 
Dyer, Almon J., Sharon, 
Dyer, Nathan T., Ashburnham, 
♦Eames. Charles O., Athol, 
Earnshaw, Albert F., Chelmsford, 
Eastman, Lucius R., Franiingham, 
Eaton, Samuel, Brimfield, 
Eaton, Walter S., Wenham, 
Egleston, Nathaniel H., Jamaica 





57 




58 




58 


•'■• 


49 




4i i 




i; ■ 




59 


2, 


48 


hi 


46 




48 




61 


B, 


til 


28, 


61 



Plain, 

Ekins, Grove F., Millbury, 
Elder, Hugh, Fou-es, Scotland, 
Eldridge, Ernest W., Upton, 
Elsesser, Paul D., Boston, 
Elsesser, Rene, Pittsfield, 
Emerson, Thomas A., Hadley, 
♦Emery, John C, New Boston, 
*Emery, Samuel H.. Interlaken, 
Emrich, Frederick E., Boston, 
Enman, James E., Fall River, 
Enler, Percy H., Worcester, 
*Erikson, August, Boston, 
Estabrook, Frank P., Needbam, 



is 


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4, 


:,s 


1880 


26, 


en 


14 


46 


hi 


53 




5S 




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30 




24 


54 


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58 


18, 


62 






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51 


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60 


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til 



Statistics 
♦Estabrook, William A., Amherst, 2, 
Evans, Daniel, Cambridge, 6, 

Evans, Edward, Foxboro, 12, 

Evans, John L., Auburn, 2, 

Evans, Walter A., Plainfield, III., 
Ewing, George H., Norwich, Conn., 
Fairbank, Henry, Ahmednagar, India. 
Fairbanks, Francis J., Rovalston, 24, 
Farwell. Parris T„ Wellesley Hills, 28, 
Fate, Francis A., Middlefield, 
Fay, Henry C, Lexington, 
Fay, Prescott, Saxonville, 
Fay, Salomon P., Dorchester, 
Fav, Walcott, Nantucket, 
♦Ferrin. Allen C, Lowell, 16, 

Field. Aaron W., Gihum, N. H., 
Fisher, Oren D., Bridgeport, Conn., 
Fitch, Albert P., Boston, 4, 

Flag?, James W., Merrimac, 18, 

Flint. George H., Dorchester, 6, 

Floody, Robert J., Worcester, 
Forbes, Washington H., Gilenil, Me., 
Ford, Edward T., Tacoma, Wash., 
Foster, Addison P., Neu- Platz, N. Y., 
♦Foss, George A., Erving, 10, 

Fowle, James L., Turkey, 
Francis, Everett D., Springfield, 
Frary, Eugene M., Bernardston, 4, 

Fraser, David, Manchester, A'. H., 
Frazee. Fenton E., West Newbury, 30, 
Freeman. George E., Fresno, Cat, 
French. Edgar B., Brockton, 6, 

French. Henry H., Maiden, 16, 

Frink, Benson M., West Brookfield, 
Frost, Amelia A., Hudson, 
Frost, George B., Hudson, 14, 

Frvling. William, Easton, 10, 

Full?-. Augustus H., Ballardvale, 2, 

♦Fuller. Frank A., South Dartmouth, 8, 
Fullerton, Bradford M., Brockton, 
Fulton, Robert N., Littleton, 16, 

Gale. Tyler E.. Greenville, N.H., 
Gallagher, William, South Braintree. 
Gammell, Sereno D., North Brookfield, 
Gates. Charles H., Wilbraham, 
Gates, Owen H., Andover, 
Gay, Henry H., Groton, 
Gav. W illiam M., Georgetown, 
Gaylord. J. Howard, West Brook 



field, 

Gillam, Ralph, Melrose, 
Gilman, Burton S., Gardner, 
Gilman, George P., Fresno, Cat., 
Giroux, Louis F., Springfield, 
Gleason, Avery K., Raynham, 
Gleason, George L., Haverhill, 
Gleason, Herbert W., Boston, 
Gleason. John F., South Amherst, 
Goddard, Dwight, Cleveland, Ohio, 
G.iodacre, James J,, Hamilton, 
Goodrich, Joseph A., Shelburne, 
Goodrich. Lincoln B., Taunton, 
Good-peed, Frank L.. Springfield, 
Goodyear, De Mont, Abington, 
Gordon, George A., Boston, 
Gordon, George A., Southbridge, 
Gordon, Robert F., Brookline, 
Gordon, William C, Westfield, 
♦Gove, J. Sherman, Harvard, 
Graham, John, Warwick, 
♦Graves, Lucien C, Granville Center, 
Greeley, Leslie C, Newburyport, 
Greene, John M., Lowell, 



28, 



70 



Statistics 



[1906 



Statistics 

Gregg, James E„ Pittsfield, 22, 47 

Griltin, Edward II., Baltimore, Md., 47 

♦Griffiths, Frederick R., Beverly, 1903 

Grimes, Frank J., South Hadley, 52 

♦Groezinger, Christian, Wareham, 2S, 

Groop, Andrew, Fitchburg, 10, 53 

Grosvenor, Edwin A., Amherst, 52 
Grover, Richard B., Cambridgeport, 8, 58 

Gulick, Edward L., Hanover, N. H., 53 

*Gustin, Byron F., East Pepperell, 12, 

Gutterson, George H., Winchester, 57 

Haarvig, John O., Allston, 6, 59 
H:n!lin'k, I'.dwin H., San Francisco, 

Cat., 50 

Hale, Harris G„ Brookline, 6, 59 

Hall, George A., Peabody, 56 

Hall, John C, Sturbridge, 26, 62 

Hall, Lvman E., No. Ahington, 55 

Hall. Newton M., Springfield, 26, 50 

Hallett, Horace F., Ashfield, 2, 49 

Halmertz, John E., Woburn, 32, 

Hamilton, Benjamin F., Roxbury, 58 

Hamilton, John A., Sharon, 58 

Hamlin, Charles H., Ea.-thampton, 10, 51 

Handy. John C, Pittsneld, III., 53 

Hardy, Edwin N., Quincy, 22, 54 

Harlow, Samuel A., Grafton. 12, 62 

Harmon, Elijah, So. Braintree, 54 

Harrington, Charles E., W'altham, 59 

Harris, Jr., Charles E., Hyannis, 47 

♦Harris, George, Amherst. 1869 

Harris. William. Woods Hole, 10, 47 
♦Harvey, Jasper P., Chester, 

Haskell, Joseph N.. Rowley, 24, 49 

Haskins, Robert W., Reading, 60 

Hatch, Franklin S., Newton, 50 
H.-iughton, Ralph J., Wevmouth 

Hts., 30, 54 

Hawks. Theron H., Springfield, 50 
Hawkins, Chauncev J.. Jamaica Plain. 4, 48 

Hawley, John A., Shelburne Falls, 24, 49 

Hayes, Edward C, Montague. 18, 49 
Haylev, John VV., Center Tujtonboro, 

N. H., 47 

Hayward, Sylvanus. Globe Village, 48 

Hedberg, Emil, Gbteborg, Sueden, 57 

♦Hen kick, Webster L., Norwich, 14, 

Henrikson, Carl F., Quincy, 22, 54 

Hersey, Charles F., New Bedford, 55 

Hewitt, George R., West Medway, IS, 52 

Hibbard. Rufiis P., Tryon, N. C, 56 

Hicks, Lewis W.. Wellesley, 52 

Higgons, John A.. Chelsea, 8, 57 

Hill, Calvin G., Milton, 54 

Hill, James L., Salem, 60 

Hilton, John V.. Boulder. Colo., 57 

Hincks, Edward Y., Andover, 46 

Hitchcock, Albert W., Worcester, 32, 61 

Hitchcock, Milan H., Winchendon, 62 

♦Hobein, Edward, Clinton, 8, 
Hodges Alpheus C, Canaan Four 

Corners, N. Y ., 47 

Hodges, Arthur, Brooklyn, N. Y. 50 

Hoffman, John H., North Reading. 22, 60 
lb.ll.mok Charles P.. Marshfield 

Hills, 18, 

♦Holm, Charles J., Fitchburg. 10, 

Holmes, Henry M„ Provincetown, 53 

Holton, Charles S., Newburj-port, 20, 49 

Bond, Edward C, Wellesley Hills, 52 

Hood. George A., Boston, 59 

Hopkins, Henry, Williamstown, 1861 

Hopley, Samuel, Lee, 48 



Statistics 

Horner, John W., Revere, 24, 57 

House, Albert V., Worcester, 32, 61 

Howard, Martin S., Wilbraham, 30, 50 

Howe, George M, Groton, 12, 53 

Howie, David, Hopedale, 63 

Hoyt, Henry N„ Hyde Park, 14, 58 

Hubbard, Charles L., Arlington, , 49 

Hubbard, George H., Haverhill, 14, 49 

Hudson, Alan, Brockton, 6, 54 

Hudson, Alfred S., Ayer, 53 

Hudson, Dorr A., No. Chelmsford. 8, 46 

♦Hughes, Eugene B., Worcester, 32, 

Hughes, Hugh P., Saxonville, 12, 52 

Hunnewell, Frank S., Reading, 24, 60 

Hunt, Emerson L., Charlestown, 54 

Hunt, Eugene F., Maynard, 18, 52 

Huntington, Henrv S., Milton, 18, 54 

Hurlburt, Calvin B., South Dennis, 47 

Hyde, Albert M., Brockton, 6, 

♦Isakson, Andrew J., Rockport, 24, 

♦Ives, Henry S., Westhampton, 30, 

Jackson. George A., Swampscott, 56 

James, D. Melancthon, Newton, 1SS7 

♦James, Owen, Lowell, 10, 

♦Janes, George M., Becket, 2, 

Jelliffe, W. Raymond, Boston, 1900 
Jenkins, Jonathan L., Jamaica Plain, 1855 

♦Jenness, George O., Charlton, 8, 

Jewett, John E. B., Pepperell, 53 

Job, Philip A., North Falmouth, 10, 47 

Johason, Albion H., Roslindale, 14, 58 

Johnson, Francis H., Andover, 46 

Johnson, George A., Swampscott, 26, 

Johnson, George H., Taunton, 28, 60 

Johnson, John A., Lynn, 16, 56 

Jones, Franklin C. Norfolk, 52 

Jones, Gustavus W., \\ inchendon, 30, 62 

Jordon, William W., Clinton, • 8, 61 

Julien, Matthew C, New Bedford, 20, 55 

Kasson, Frank H., Boston, 57 
Kambour, Gabriel, Colebrook, N. H., 62 

Kebbe, David L., Greenwich, 12, 50 

Keedv, John L., North Andover, 20, 46 

Kellev, Frederick I., Derry, N. H., 56 

Kelly, Edward P., Pigeon Cove, 24, ."6 

Kelsey, William S., Allston, 4, 59 
Kendall, Robert R. .Winter Park, Fla., 54 

Kennedy. Jr., Daniel R., Needham, 20, 

Kenney, Charles H., Jackman, Me., 50 

Kenngott, George E., Lowell, 16, 46 

Ketchen, Charles P.. Wolcoti, Conn., 48 

Keyser, Calvin, Goshen, 12, 51 

Kilbon. John L., Springfield, 26, 50 

Kilburn, David, Allegheny, Pa., 46 
Kimball. Harry W., So. Weymouth, 30, 54 

King. James B., Hopkinton, 52 
Kingsbury, John D.. Salt Lake City, 49 

Kinne. Thomas C, Montague. 49 

Knight, Frederick!'., Northbridge, 20, 58 

Knight, William A., Brighton, 4, 59 

Knowlton, Francis B., Athol, 62 

Labaree. John C. Saugns, 24, 56 

Lade, James, Bristol, N. H., 54 

Laird, James H.. Hinsdale. 14, 47 

♦Lamb, Alonzo T., Plainfield. 22, 

Lambert, Avery E., Framingham, 52 

Lane, John W., North Hadley, 12, 52^ 

Lathrop, Edward A., Essex. 10. 56 

Lawrence, George W., Neu-fane, Vt. 52 

Leach, Adoniram J.. Reading, 55 

Leavitt, Burke F., Belmont, 4, 60 

Leavitt. Horace H., Somerville, 57 

Lee, Dorrall, Blackstone, 4, 63 



.. 



1906J 



Names of Ministers 



71 



Statistics 
Lee, Gerald Stanley, Northampton, 51 
Lee, Samuel H. Springfield, 50 
Lees, John W.j Westminster, 30, 62 
Leonard, Edwin, Melrose Highlands, 59 
Lewis, Alexander, Kansas City, Mo., 61 
Lewis, John B., Trop, N. Y., 48 
Libby. Frederick J., Magnolia, 12, 56 
Life, Robert H, Haydenville, 30, 51 
Lincoln, Clarence A., Manchester, 18, 56 
Lindegren, Oscar, East Boston, 59 
Lndholm, Frank A. L.. Lowell, 16, 56 
*Lindstrom, Peter, Waltham, 28, 
Little, Arthur, Dorchester, 4 58 
Living-ton, Stephen,'!'., Fryehura, Me.,' 48 
Locke, William E., Wellesley, 53 
Lockwood, John H., Springfield, 50 
Loder, Achilles L., Thetford, Vt., 58 
Lombard, Frank A., Kioto, Japan, 63 
Lombard, Herbert E., Rowley, 
, R- F. D., 20, 49 
Loomis, Charles W., Ashby, 2 53 
Loomis, Elihu, Centerville, 47 
Loomis, Samuel L., Jamaica Plain, 4, 5S 
Lord, John M., Weymouth, 54 
Lothrop, Charles D., Los A ngeles, Cat, 5S 
Loud, Halah H., Lead, S. D., 60 
Love, George W., West Springfield, 30, 50 
Lovejoy, George E., Lawrence, 16, 60 
Lovering, Joseph F., Somerville, 61 
Low, Warren F., Georgetown, 12, 49 
Lucas, Burton A., Marshfield, 18, 55 
Luce, Frank L., Dorchester, 6 5S 
Luce, T. Claire, Richmond, 24, 47 
Lundgren, Carl A., Joliet. Ill, 56 
Lyman, Frederick B. Fairhaven, 10, 55 
Lyman, Payson W., Fall River, 10, 60 
*Lytle, James A., Ashland, 2, 
MacBriar, Thomas, Brookline, 60 
MacCallum, Hugh, Walpole, 28, 
MacColl, John A., Providence, R. /., 55 
MacDermid, Duncan, Boston, 57 
MacDonald, John J., New York, 60 
MacFadden, Robert A., Danvers. 8, 56 
Macfarland, Charles S., South Nor- 
folk, Conn., 60 
*MacGeehon, Selden, Southampton, 26, 
Macnair, William ML, Mansfield, 18, 52 
MacQueen, Feter, Charlestown, 4, 57 
Mallary, R. DeWitt, Housatonic, 12, 48 
Manavian, Garabed M., Worcester, 32, 61 
Mank, Herbert G., Lawrence, 16, 46 
Mann, Wilford E., Indian Orchard, 26, 50 
Manning, Frederic W., Nantucket, 18, 55 
Manwell, Augustine P., Canton, 8, 5S 
Manwell. John P., North Amherst, 2, 52 
March, Daniel, Woburn, 30, 60 
Marsh, Francis J. , Leominster, 52 
Marshall, Charles P., Westford, 30, 53 
Martin, George E., Lowell, 16, 46 
Martini, Fritz W., Fitchburg, 10, 53 
Martyn, Sanford S., Plantsville, 

Conn., 51 

Martyn, William C, Acushnet, 20, 55 

Mason, Henry B., Duxbury, 10, 55 

Matthews, George A., Auburndale, 59 

Matthews, John LI., Worcester, 30. 61 

Mavromates. L. K., Chicago, 111., 46 

McAllister, Frank B., Cohasset, 8, 54 

McCuIlagh, Archibald, Worcester, 61 

Mc El veen, William T., Boston, 4, 59 

McKenzie. Alexander, Cambridge, 6, 57 
*McKenzie, Alexander I,., Win- 

throp, 30, 



Statistics 
McKinnon, Norman, Cliftondale, 24 
McKnight, John A., Lowell, 10, 

McLean, Thomas D., Plymouth, 
McMillan, Peter, Boston, 
Means, Frederick 11., Winchester, 
Means, Oliver W., Springfield, 26, 

Megathlin, Henry G., Wollaston, 24, 
Merriam, Charles L., Derry, N. H., 
Merriam, Charles W., Greenfield. 12, 
Merriam, Frank N., Turners Falls, 18, 
Merriam, George F., Deerfield, 8 

Merrick, Frank W., West Koxbury, 
Merrill, Charles C, Winchendon, 
Merrill, George P.. Newburyport, 
Merrill, John L., Winchendon, 
Merrill, Selah, Jerusalem, 
Merrill, Truman A., Maiden, 
Merriman, Daniel, Boston, 
Mevis, Lyman, Cotuit, 
Mevis. Martin F., Southboro, 
Mickels, Peter A.. Worcester, 
Miles, Thomas M., Acton, 
Miller, Jason G., Quincy, Atlantic, 
Miller, Joel D., Leominster, 
Miller, Robert D., Maiden, 
Miller, William S. A., East Bridge- 
water, 
Mills, Augustus W., Framingham, 
Mills, Frank E , Hubbardston, 
Mi nehi n. William J., Ames, la., 
Mitchell. Charles L., Winchester, 
Mitchell, J. Lee, Attleboro, 
Mix, Clifton H., Worcester, ; 

Mix, Eldridge, Worcester, 
Moon, Francis, Chiltonville, 



4, 


58 


30. 


62 


20, 


VI 




62 




-li, 




i;m 


32, 


61 


2 


61 


-o. 


53 




61 


2, 


.-.:: 


24, 


58 




53 




61 


1", 


53 




53 



Moure, I-'dson 

Moore, Edward C, Cambridge, 57 

Moore, George F., Cambridge, 57 

Moore, John K., Orange, 22, 49 
Morehouse, Darius A., Hancock, 

N. H., 59 

Morrison, Samuel, Braintree, 54 
Morrow, Horace E., Rapid City, 

So. Dak., 49 

Morton, Howard A., Orleans, 22, 47 

Moses, Vincent, Natick, 53 

Moxom, Philip S„ Springfield, 26, 50 

Mulnix. Andrew H., Brighton, 6, 
Munro, Egbert N., West Stafford, 

Conn., 62 
Murray, William J., Boston, 57 
Muttart, William L., Phillipston, 22, 62 
Newcomb, Edward H., Newbury- 
port, 20, 49 
Newton, Albert F., N. Leominster, 16, 53 
Newton, D. Augustine, Winchester, 30, 61 
Newton, George J.. Wellfleet, 28, 50 
Nicholls, Sampson. Colerain, 8. 49 
Nichols, JesseG., South Hadley, 26, 56 
Nickerson, Sylvester S., Somerville, 57 
*Norseen. Oscar F., Worcester, 32, 
Norton, Edward, Quincy, 54 
Norton, Stephen A., Woburn, 30, 61 
Noyes, Charles L., Somerville, 26, 57 
Noyes, Edward M.. Newton Center, 20. 59 
Noyes, Frank J., Dighton, 10, 60 
Noyes, Frederick P.. Sciiuate Cen., 24, 55 
Noves, Warren L.. West Peabody, 22, 56 
Oleson, William B.,Groton, 48 
Oliphant. Charles H.. Methuen, 18, 46 
Olmstead, Charles, Three Rivers, 22, 50 
Osborne, Cyrus P., Cambridge, 5S 



72 



Statistics 



[1906 






Statistics 






50 


16. 


5t; 


2, 


17 


20. 


59 


e, 16. 


46 



Osgood, George W., Lynn, 
Owen, George W., Lynn, 
Owen, Richard. Hyannis, 
Oxnard, Henry E., Newton, 
Page, Frederick H., Lawrence 
Page, Harlan, Hardwick, 
Paisley, John O., Holbrook, 
Palmer, Frank IL, Braintree, 
Papazian, Manasseh, Aintab, Turkey, 
Park, J. Edgar, Andover. 2, 46 

♦Parker, Charles O.. Berlin, 4, 

Parker, Frederic , Sherman Mills, Me., 47 
Parker, Horace, Lynnfield Center, 53 

Parmelee, William J., Worthington, 51 

Patrick, Henry J., Newtonville, 20, 59 

Patton, Cornelius H., Boston, 59 

Patton, Myron O., Attleboro, R. F. 

D. No. 1, 50 

Peabody, Albert B., East Boxford, 56 

Peebles. Arthur, South Acton, 2, 53 

*Pedersen, Ludvig J., Roxbury, 6, 

Peffers, Aaron B., Stoneham, 61 

Peloubet, Francis \\\, Auburndale, 
Penniman, Alford B., Chicago, 111., 
Pennock, Benjamin, Gralton, Vt., 
Percival. Charles H., Maiden, 
Perry, Charles A., Sharon, 
Perry, George H., Lakeville, 
Perry, Lawrence, Wayland, 
Perry, Lewis E., Ayer, 
Peters, Richard, Baldwinville, 
♦Peterson, Carl E., Cambridge, 
Phelps, Lawrence, Leominster, 
Phillips, Ellsworth W., Worcester, „. 
Phipps, George G., Newton Highlands 
Pickett, Cyrus, Dorchester, 
Pierce, Albert F., Campello, 
Pierce, Charles M., Worcester, 
Pierce, George J., Worcester, 
Pierce, Leroy M., Medfield, 
Pierpont, John, Williamsburg, 
Pierson, Isaac, Wellesley Hills, 



54 



53 



28, 02 



::-', 



30, 51 



57 
4, 58 



Pitts, Eddy T., Saylesville, R. I. 
*Plattner, John W., Andover, 
Plumb, Albert H., Roxbury, 
Plumb, Jr., Albert H., Gill, 
Pogue, John A., West Wareham, 1 
Pomeroy, Edward N.. Wellesley, 
Pond, Evarts W., Windsor Locks, 

Conn., 
Poor, William G., Topsfield, 
Pope, Charles H., Cambridge, 
Porter, Edward C, Watertown, 
Porter. Harvey, Beirut, Syria, 
Post, W. Stanley. Ludlow Center, 
Potter, Clayton J., Lenox, 
Pratt,, Arthur P., Chelsea, 
Pratt, D. Butler, Springfield, 
Pratt, George H., Paxton, 
Pratt, Nathaniel M„ Monson, 
Pride, Edward W., Andover, 
Prudden, Theodore P., W. Newton, 
Puddefoot, William G., South Fraru- 

ingham, 
Putnam, tieorge A.. Millbury, 
Raokett, 10. Irving, No. Pownal, Vt., 
Rader, Paul, Portland, Ore.. 
Rae, John T., Ereter, N. If., 
Rae, Robert L., Brockton. 6, 5S 

Hamsdell, Frank E.. New Bedford, 20, 55 
Rankin, Isaac O., Boston, 59 



28. 


5C, 




57 




59 




51 


16, 


51 


16, 


IS 




57 


26, 


50 


22, 


ill 


is, 


50 




4 6 


20, 


59 




53 


18, 


63 




47 




57 




17 



Statistics 
Ratcliffe, Charles A., Norton, 22, 

Rawson, Edward It., Annapolis, Md., 
Reed, David A., Springfield, 
Reed, Edward A., Holyoke, 14, 

Reed, Frank H., Ossipee, N. H., 
♦Reeves, Charles E., Princeton, 22, 

Reid, David C, Cambridge, 8, 

Reid, John, Franklin, 12, 

Renshaw, William E., Lynnfield 

Center, 16, 

Rhoades, Winfred C, Roxbury, 4, 

Rice, Augustus M., Dunstable, 10, 

Rice, Charles B., Danvers, 
Rice, Walter, Agawam, 2, 

Rich, Charles S.. Claremont, Cat, 
Richards, Frederick B., So. Boston, 4, 
♦Richards, Thomas O, Warren, 28, 

Richardson, Daniel W., Bedford, 
Richardson, Martin L., Montague, 
♦Rivoire, Enrico, Plymouth, 6, 

Robinson, Edward A., Hingham, 14, 

Robinson, Edwin B., Holyoke, 14, 

Rollins, Walter H., Wilmington, 30, 

Rondeau, Samuel P., Fall River, 10, 
Roper, Elijah H., Salem, 
Ropes, James H., Cambridge, 
Ropes. William L., Andover, 
Rose. Henry T., Northampton, 20, 

Ross, James H., Cambridge. 
Rotch, Caleb L., Monmouth, Me., 
Rowley, Charles H., North Crafts- 
bury, Vt., 
Rudd, Edward IL. Dedham, S, 

Rutan, Frederick N., Wrentham, 32, 
Ryder, Henry A., Harwich, 14, 

Ryder, William H., Andover, 
Sample, Philmer A., Easton Center, 
Sanborn, F. Arthur, Gloucester, 12, 

♦Sargent, Edward O, Halifax, 12, 

Sawyer, Joseph H., Eastharr.pton, 
Sawyer, Roland D., Ward Hill, 14, 

Schmavonian, Arsene B., Ccmstanti- 



Scott, Charles, Reading, 
♦Scott, Darius B., Lancaster, 14, 

Siott. George H., Atkinson. N. H., 
♦Scott, James F., South Williams- 
town, 30, 
Scott, Willard, Worcester, 32, 
Seabury. Joseph B., V/elleslcy Hills, 
Seagrave, James O, Hinsdale, 
Sears. Langley B., So. Boston, 6, 
Sedgwick, Arthur H., Shrewsbury, 26, 
Seelye, L. Clark, Northampton, 
Seibert, J. Addison, Kansas City, 

Sewall, John L., Randolph, 24, 

S.nvall, Jot ham B.. Brookline, 
Sewall, Oliver D., Broi.kline, 6, 

Sevmour, Edward P., Charlemont, 8, 
Shaver, Melville A., Boston, 
Sherrill, Alvah F.. Atlanta. Ga., 
Shipmau, Frank R., Andover, 2, 

Sims, Thomas, Melrose, 18. 

Skinner, Charles L., Harwichport, 12, 
Slack, Ezra H., Brookline, 
Sleeper, Henry D., Northampton, 
Sleeper, William W., Wellesley, 28, 
Smart, George T., Newton High- 
lauds. 20, 
Smart, I. Chipman. Burlington, Vt., 
Smith, Albert D., Northboro, 20, 



1906] 



Names of Ministers 



73 



14, 



21. 



Statistics 
Smith, Azro A., Reading, 
Smith, Caleb E., Heath, 
♦Smith, Charlea H., Barre, 
Smith, Edward G., Templeton, 
Smith, Edwin IL, Lowell, 
Smith, Henry G., Goshen, 
Smith, Henry P., Amherst, 
Smith, Henry W„ Lee, 
Smith, Judson, Roxbury, 
Smith, N. Fay, East Northfield, 
Smith, William S., Worcester, 
S D eU. Laird W New York, 
Snow, Everard W., Beverly, 
Snyder, Henry S., Gilbertville, 
Solandt James A., Rutland, 
Southgate, Charles M., Newton ville, 
Spangler, Alpheus M., Mittineague, 
Speare, S. Lewis B., Newton, 
Spence, William IL, Cambridge, 
Sprague, Franklin M., Tampa, Fla., 
Stackpole, Everett S., Bradford, 
Stackpole, Markham W., Boston, 
Stanton, George F., Boston, 
St. Aubin, Thomas S., Perkins, P. ( 

Canada, 
Stearns, Gaorge W., Jamaica Plain, 
Stebbins. Herbert W., Boston, 
Stembridgs Alfred E., Woburn, 
Stetson, Oscar F., North Carver, 
♦Stevens, Henry A., Brighton, 
Stockdale, Allen A., Boston, 
Stocking, JavT., Newtonville, 
Stocking. William R., Williamstown 
Stowe, Charles E., Bridgewater, 
Streeter, Willard E., Brookfield. 
Strong, E. Ellsworth, Auburndale, 
Strong, William E., Amherst, 
Stryker, Garrett V., Mill River, 
*Stuart, Isambert B., Beechwuod, 
Sturgis, Frank E., Natick, 
Sweet, William I., Everett, 
Swift, Clarence F., Fall River, 
Taft, Rufus M., Worcester, 
Talmage, Charles H., Taunton, 
Taylor, Frederick C, Thorndike, 
Taylor, John G., Arlington Heights, 
Taylor, John Phelps, Andover, 
Tead, Edward Sampson, Somerville 
Tenney, Edward P., North Cambridge. 
Tenney, WiUiam L., Chicago, III., 
Tewksbury, George A., Concord, 
Thayer, Frederick P., Dudley, 
Thomas, Lewis J., Millbrook, 
Thomas, Reuen, Brookline, 
Thompson, George O., Truro. 
Thompson, Nathan, Laurel, Md., 
Thompson, William S., Bedford, 
Thorp, Charles N., Chelsea, 
Thorpe. Ole O.. Concord, 
Thrall, J. Brainerd, Leicester, 
Thurston, C. A. G., Chelsea, 
Thurston. John R., Whitinsville, 
Thwing, Charles F., Cleveland, Ohio 
Thygeson, Hanson E., Chesterfield, 
Tilton, George H., N. Woburn, 
Titcomb, Arthur, Springfield, 
Tobey, Rufus B., Boston, 
Todd, Albert G., Worcester, 
Todd, George L., Havana, Cuba, 
Tole-nin, Charles B., Sterling, 
Tomblen, Charles L., N. Middleboro, 18, 
Torosyan, Hohannes T., Centerville, 
Torrey, Charles C, New Haven, Conn 





61 


14, 


49 


2. 




28 


53 


io! 


46 




52 


2, 


52 


16, 


47 




58 


22, 


40 



10, 


60 




62 


28. 


60 


22. 


50 


2, 


57 




46 




57 


^e, 


57 




47 


8. 


53 


10. 


48 




56 


6, 


59 


28, 


47 




53 




57 


8, 






53 


16, 


62 




57 


20, 


63 




5, 


8, 


51 


30, 


61 


2 


50 




47 


32, 


62 




49 


26, 


62 


IN, 


(i«i 


2, 


47 



Statist 
Torrey, Charles C, Andover, 
Torrey, David C, Bedford, 
Torrey, Joseph, Shirley, 
Tower. William H., S. Framingham, 
Trask. John L. R., Springfield, 
Travis, A. Ferdinand, Hopkinton, 
Trowbridge, John P., N. Rochester, 
Truesdale, Arthur L., Wendell, 
Truslow, Arthur, Greenpoint, N. V. 
Turk, Morris H., Natick, 
*Tuthill, C. Julian, Mattapoisett, 
Tuttle, John E., Lincoln, Neb., 
Twombly, Alexander S., Newton, 
Tyler, Henry M., Northampton, 
Udd, John, Cambridge, 
Underwood, Rufus S., Spiingfield, 
Vaitses, Stephen, Melrose, 
Van der Pyl, Nicholas, Marblehead, 
Van Horn, Francis J., Seattle, Wash., 
*Varley, Arthur, Yarmouth, 
Vauthier, Leon P. F., Haverhill, 
Viets, Francis H., West Acton, 
Vincent, Thomas H., N. Weymouth, 
Voorhees, J. Spencer, Adams, 
Waldron, Daniel W., Boston, 
Waldmn, John D., Buekland, 
♦Walker, Avery S., Wellesley Hills 
Walker, Charles S., Amherst, 
Walker, John J., Westboro, 
Walker, William S.. Newington.Com 
Wallace, Robert W., Somerville, 
Ward, Arthur N., Somerville, 
Ward, George M., Aurora, N. Y., 
Wiirlield, Franke A., Milford, 
Washburn, Charles fl., Neponset, 
Washburn, George, Constantinople, 
Washburn, George T., India, 
Washburn, George Y., Everett, 
Waters, T. Frank, Ipswich, 
Wathen, Charles B., Rehoboth, 
Watson, Carey H., Greenfield, 
Watson, Charles C, Lynn, 
Webber, George N., Northampton, 
Webster, Eugene C, Jamaica Plain, 
Weeden, Charles F., Lynn, 
Weeden, William O., Concord, 
Welles T. Clayton, Eddington, Pa., 
Wellman, Joshua W., Maiden, 
Weston, Bartlett H., W. Newbury, 
Wheeler. Edgar C. Rockland, 
Wheelock, Albert H., Pepperell, 
White, Charles A., Woonsocket, R. I., 
White, Charles E.. Amherst, N. H., 
White, Isaac C, Plymouth. 
White, Ralph H., Cummington, 
Whitehill, John, Oldtown, 
Whiting, Elbridge C, So. Sudbury, 
Whiting, Lyman, East Charlemont, 
Whitney, Charles H., Cambridge, 
Wild, John, Medford, 
Wilder, Charles S.,East Longmeadow 
Willcox, Charles H., Lawrencertlle 

N.J.. 
Willcox, Inman L., Worcester, 
Williams, Charles H., Gloucester, 
Williams, Walter B., Boxford. 
Williamson, James S., Haverhill, 
Willis Josiah C, Wilbraham, 
Willmott. Benjamin A., Lowell, 
Wilson, Frederick A., Andover, 
Winch, George W., Holyoke, 
Winship, Albert E., Somerville, 
Winslow, Edward C., Brookline, 



24, 


53 




53 




51) 




53 


24, 


55 


28, 


49 




5 1 


'l8, 


53 


18, 






62 




59 




51 




62 


26 


51) 


1903 


18, 


56 




62 


32, 




14. 


49 


6, 


53 


30. 


51 


2, 


47 


1867 


6, 


49 


20, 






52 


28, 


63 



4, 


58 




57 




48 


10, 


57 


14, 


56, 


21. 


60 


12, 


49 




56 




57 




5.x 


16, 


56 




53 




46 




61 


30, 


■■• 


24, 


54 



■M. 


5!) 


8, 


3! 




47 


IS. 


55 


.10. 


50 




46 


32, 


62 




57 


6.' 


56 


14, 


49 




50 


16, 


53 


2, 


46 


14, 


SI 




:','. 



74 



Statistics 



[1906 



Statistics 

Wiswall, Alexander, Uxbridge, 28, 63 

VVolcott, William K.. Lawrence, 14, 46 

Wood, Benjamin C, Rochester, N. Y., 53 

Wood, Franklin P., Acton, 53 

Wood, Irving F.. Northampton, 51 

Wood, Sumner G., Blandford, 4, 50 

Wood. Will C, Boston, 56 

Wnodbridge, Richard G., Somerville,26, 57 

Woodbury, Webster, S. Framingham, 53 

Woodin, Herbert P.. Chicopee, 8, 51 

Woodrow, Samuel H., Springfield, 26, 51 

Note. — A blank in both columns indicates that the person began pastoral service sine 
the reports of the churches were received and compiled. 



Statistics 

Woodruff, Frank E., Brunswick, Me., 46 

Woods, Robert M., Hatfield, 14, 52 

Woodwell.William H. ,Seabrook,N.H., 47 

Woodworth, Charles L., Lewiston, Me. 55 

Wright, George W., Boston, 55 

Wright, Richard, Newburypoit, 20, 49 

Yeoman. J. Herbert, Providence, It. I., 46 

Yorke. Burt L., West Medford, 18. 61 

Ynunkin. Cvrus L. t>., Boston, 58 
Zellars, Edwih G., Spencer, 26, 



LICENTIATES UNDER CARE, MEMBERS OF ASSOCIATIONS NOT OR- 
DAINED AND OTHERS NOT ORDAINED, WITH THE PAGE WHERE 
THE NAME OCCURS. 



Names starred 



those of persons supplying churches, but not under care of any 
Association in this State. 



Carson, Thomas M., 
Child. Francis S., 
Crane, William M., 
Crewell. Edward P., Prof., Amherst, 
Cummings. Arthur G., Andover, 
Dundee. Maurice J., Cornish, N. H., 
Elwell, Levi H., Prof., Amherst, 
Fisher. Albert V., '. 

Greenough, James C, Westlield, 



*Habberley, Robert C, Otis, 

Iloll.ro,, k. Charles P., 

Kelly, Arthur W., Auburndale, 

M-m tactic, William L., Amherst, 

"Packard, Harrison I,., Kingston, 

*Ran,l. Ernest L., Oakham, 

Sadler. Alfred J.. 

Thomas, James I., Halifax, 



MINISTERS OF OTHER DENOMINATIONS SUPPLYING CONGREGA- 
TIONAL CHURCHES IN MASSACHUSETTS, INCLUDING SOME 
WHOSE POSITION IS NOT SPECIFIED. 



A.-ehane, John B., Dover, 
Burke, John C, Truro, 
Eekardt, Russell L., Georgetown, 
Felrh. Albert, Natick, 
Hodgson, William C, Beverly, 
Hultman, John A., Worcester, 
Kempton, Austin F., Lunenburg, 



Loofbourrow, Leon L., Charlestown, 4, 
Mack, Ovid lv, Beachmont, 24, 

Smythe, George H., Holvoke, 14, 

Tor'bet, Howard L., Maiden, 16. 

Turner, Sebastian D.. Brockton, 6, 

Webb, William H., West Springfield, 30, 
I Withrow, John L., Boston, 4,